NUI Galway Academic Recognised as One of Ireland's Top Women in Technology

Monday, 7 July 2014

NUI Galway’s Catherine Cronin (right) receives the award for Top Role Model of 2014 in Social Media from Sinead McSweeney, Twitter’s director of public policy for Europe, the Middle East and Africa.
NUI Galway’s Catherine Cronin (right) receives the award for Top Role Model of 2014 in Social Media from Sinead McSweeney, Twitter’s director of public policy for Europe, the Middle East and Africa.

Catherine Cronin, Academic Co-ordinator of online IT programmes and Lecturer in Information Technology at NUI Galway, has been named as one the top role models of 2014 among women in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) in Ireland.

This was awarded by Silicon Republic, who recently drew up a list of the Top 100 Women in STEM in Ireland, and Catherine was presented with the award for Top Role Model of 2014 in Social Media. The list consisted of world-leading academics to inspiring science communicators, from tech business leaders to early entrepreneurs, in the areas of science, technology, engineering and maths.

Catherine’s work focuses on online and open education, digital literacies, and social media in education. In addition to her teaching and research, she works with schools and community groups, including Coder Dojo, exploring these areas. She is currently pursuing a PhD in open education and digital identity practices. She holds a BSc in Mechanical Engineering, Masters of Engineering in Systems Engineering, and MA in women's studies, where her dissertation topic was gender and technology. Using the Twitter hashtag #ITwomen, she created several resources including a list of women keynote speakers as a resource for those planning gender-inclusive tech conferences.

Speaking at the award ceremony, Catherine said: “As a long-time advocate for girls and women in STEM, it was an honour to receive this award from Silicon Republic. Women continue to represent less than 20% of all physicists, engineers and IT professionals. Encouraging girls and women to consider STEM and providing role models and mentors are just the first steps toward changing this. Our goal must be to create an inclusive STEM culture – beginning with noticing and challenging gender and other stereotypes, and under-representation, wherever we are. Imagine STEM classrooms, labs, workplaces and conferences with a truly diverse range of people and standpoints – all working together to solve problems and to create solutions. That’s my vision of success for the future.”

-Ends-

Keywords: Press

Author: Marketing and Communications Office, NUI Galway
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