NUI Galway and Amnesty mark International Day Against Torture

NUI Galway and Amnesty mark International Day Against Torture-image

Monday, 19 June 2006

Guest speaker to include brother of Guantanamo detainee To mark International Day Against Torture, Amnesty International and The Irish Centre for Human Rights, NUI Galway, will host a panel discussion on Torture in the Age of Terror, on 28 June in Galway City Library. The discussion will feature two speakers, Abubaker Deghayes, the brother of a Guantanamo detainee, and Elvira Dominguez Redondo, an IRCHSS (Irish Research Council for the Humanities and Social Sciences) fellow with the Irish Centre for Human Rights, NUI Galway. Abubaker Deghayes is the brother of Omar Deghayes whose family is convinced that he is being held in Guantanamo Bay because of mistaken identity. The brothers fled Libya in 1987 and were granted political asylum in the UK. While in Pakistan in 2002, Omar was caught as an 'enemy combatant' and was eventually transferred to Guantanamo Bay. Throughout his capture Omar has reported to his lawyer that he has been subjected to many forms of torture. In Guantanamo Bay, where he continues to be held, he has been kept in solitary confinement for over eight months, strip searched and reportedly attacked by a guard leaving him blind in one eye. Joining Abubaker on the panel will be Dr. Elvira Dominguez Redondo, IRCHSS fellow with NUI Galway's Irish Centre for Human Rights, who previously worked as a consultant with the Special Rapporteur on Torture at the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, Geneva. According to Dr. Dominquez Redondo, "It has been suggested that the 'war on terror' has altered many fundamental norms of International Law, including the absolute prohibition of the use of torture. However, a distinction needs to be made between law breakers and norm makers. The 28 June, International Day Against Torture, should be marked in everyone's mind to reiterate the absolute nature of the norm prohibiting the use of torture and its misuse in activities such as renditions flights or Guantanamo Bay detainees." The public discussion is open to all and will take place on Wednesday 28 June, 8pm, Galway City Library, St Augustine Street, Galway. Entry: Free -ends- For further information: Amnesty International, 2-3 Middle Street, Galway 091 533 637, www.amnesty.ie Further background on Abubaker and Omar Deghayes Abubaker Deghayes is the brother of Guatanamo detainee Omar Deghayes. Abubaker, like his brother Omar, fled Libya in 1987 following the assassination of their father (trade union leader and political opponent of Colonel al-Gadaffi) by the Libyan secret police. Both brothers were granted political asylum in the UK and Omar Deghayes went to study law. In 2001 Omar Deghayes travelled to Malaysia, Pakistan and eventually Afghanistan, where he married and had a son. When the international conflict started in Afghanistan after Sept 11 2001 Omar fled to Pakistan with his wife and baby. They were planning to return to the UK when they were arrested in Lahore, Pakistan in April 2002, for a reported bounty of $5,000. Omar was caught as an 'enemy combatant' and was eventually transferred to Guantanamo Bay in Sept. 2002. Throughout his capture Omar has reported to his lawyer that he has been subjected to many forms of torture. In Pakistan he was subjected to 'systematic beatings' and stress positions, in Afghanistan 'forced nudity,' 'food deprivation' and being deprived of air for long periods of time. In Guantanamo Bay, where he continues to be held, he has been kept in solitary confinement for over eight months, strip searched and reported to have been attacked by a guard which has left him blind in one eye. Omar's family is convinced that he is being held in Guantanamo Bay because of a mistaken identity. Omar's situation is worsened by his citizenship status, he has refugee status in the UK and if released from Guantanamo Bay, the US authorities could return him to Libya, where he could be at risk of further torture.

>> Read full story about NUI Galway and Amnesty mark International Day Against Torture

Galway Scientists Lead Major Marine Climate Change Study

Galway Scientists Lead Major Marine Climate Change Study-image

Monday, 19 June 2006

One of the world's largest studies into how microscopic marine plants might affect earth's climate is currently being led by scientists from NUI Galway aboard the Marine Institute's state-of-the-art research vessel RV Celtic Explorer. The project aims to find out how dense blooms of tiny "plankton" in the ocean might enrich bursting bubbles at the surface with organic matter, leading to more stable clouds above the ocean and decreasing global warming. The Marine Aerosol Production (MAP) Project, has a total budget of €3 million and is co-ordinated by Dr. Colin O'Dowd from the Environmental Change Institute and Department of Physics, NUI Galway. MAP will utilise NUI Galway s Mace Head Atmospheric Monitoring Station in Co. Galway, the Marine Institute s Celtic Explorer, and NASA s satellite sensors to make the required observations. The project has assembled a team of 25 research groups from 20 research institutes from Europe and the US. They will spend four weeks making measurements at Mace Head and on the Celtic Explorer and the next two years analysing the gathered data, before putting the key findings into climate prediction models. The work aims to quantify the role of natural marine aerosol production and feedbacks with climate change. "Aerosol particles form haze and cloud layers that can hide the effect of global warming," said Dr. O'Dowd. "Quantifying the sources of aerosols and their global cooling effects will enable better future controls on greenhouse gas emissions in order to reduce the rate of global warming." MAP is primarily funded by the European Commission with significant Grant-Aid towards the cost of the vessel being provided through the National Research Vessel Shiptime Programme of the National Development Plan 2000 –2006. The NDP Marine RTDI measure is managed by the Marine Institute on behalf of the Department of Communications, Marine and Natural Resources. This work highlights the strategic geographic importance of Ireland and our offshore territories in studying the dynamics of the impacts of climate change and the importance of having world class infrastructures such as Mace Head and the Celtic Explorer available to Irish and international research groups to support wining leading roles in high profile international projects such as MAP. Marine Institute, CEO Dr. Peter Heffernan said, "This project highlights the strategic importance of Ireland as a natural laboratory for studying the dynamics and impacts of climate change. We are lucky to have world-class research vessels such as the Celtic Explorer to support internationally recognised Irish research groups such as Dr.O'Dowd's and enable them to take their rightful place as leaders of important projects such as MAP." The Celtic Explorer set sail to track the North Atlantic plankton blooms and their role in aerosol production on Sunday 11th June, after a week of mobilization works in Cobh shipyard. The mobilization involved 49 scientists, and almost an equivalent number of personnel from the Marine Institute, P&O Maritime and Cobh Shipyard workers. -ends- For further information, please contact: Colin O Dowd, MAP Coordinator & Senior Lecturer, Physics Department & Environmental Change Institute, National University of Ireland, Galway. Tel: 091-493306 email colin.odowd@nuigalway.ie John Breslin, Manager of Research Vessel Operations, Marine Institute, Rinville, Oranmore, Co Galway. Tel: (091) 387200 email: john.Breslin@marine.ie Notes to Editor NUI Galway has leading expertise in atmospheric and marine science research and plays an important role in the coordination of EU research projects in these fields. In terms of atmospheric composition research and monitoring, the institution has excelled in recent years in the areas of atmospheric aerosols and cloud-climate research with a number of key publications in the leading scientific journals such as Nature. NUI Galway operates the Global Atmospheric Watch station Mace Head which over the last decades has been a world renowned research facility for monitoring global atmospheric change and for conducting intensive campaigns into key processes affecting climate change. The Marine Institute was created under the Marine Institute Act in 1991 to "undertake, to co-ordinate, to promote and to assist" in the development of marine research and development in Ireland. Since its early days in Harcourt Street Dublin, it has grown into an internationally respected science body with almost 200 staff, two purpose-built vessels, a research facility near Newport, Co. Mayo, regional port facilities and now a brand new headquarters and laboratory facility at Oranmore, on the shore of Galway Bay. Plankton are microscopic animals and plants that live in the ocean. Like terrestrial plants, vegetable plankton contribute greatly to the production of life-giving oxygen into the atmosphere and the removal of carbon dioxide. Animal and vegetable plankton can also "bloom" in high concentrations, discolouring the water and giving rise to "red tides", such as the bloom of Karenia mikimoti which destroyed a great deal of marine life along the West coast of Ireland in the summer of 2005. Aerosol Particles are tiny airborne particles, about 1 millionth of a meter in size that form haze and cloud layers. They are produced both naturally and by man-made emissions. They block out a fraction of the suns energy which heats up the Earth. More aerosol particles means brighter haze and cloud layers which can reflect more of the suns energy and thus reduce the effects of global warming.

>> Read full story about Galway Scientists Lead Major Marine Climate Change Study

First in series of industry agreements for NUI Galway

First in series of industry agreements for NUI Galway-image

Monday, 19 June 2006

NUI Galway has announced a new technology commercialisation agreement with Irish company Technology from Ideas (TfI). Collaborating with NUI Galway's Technology Transfer Office, TfI will source certain categories of technology ideas from NUI Galway researchers for development and sale to industry. The agreement is the first of a series which will be announced over the coming months, each one of which will be for a particular area of research. The agreement forms part of an ongoing strategic initiative for the Technology Transfer Office at NUI Galway in the development, commercial exploitation, industrial partnering and spin-out of technologies under development by a number of research teams at the university. Dr. Daniel O'Mahony, Director of the Technology Transfer Office at NUI Galway, commented, "Collaboration between universities and industry is crucial in taking leading edge research and ideas through to fruition. At NUI Galway we have some of the world's leading scientists across different research areas. Thanks to their continued research efforts and innovation we have a wealth of intellectual property at NUI Galway and its commercialisation will continue to benefit Ireland's burgeoning 'knowledge economy'. In addition, we recognise the importance of transfer of technologies to the market place in as quick a timeframe as possible and in rewarding inventors of such technologies." Under the terms of the agreement, TfI will have access to certain categories of unrealised technologies and technology ideas in the broad engineering and physical sciencs areas. TfI will faciliate NUI Galway in the transfer of these technology research ideas from concept to the laboratory and thereafter to the market and also in the commercial exploitation of certain technologies with established intellectual property. Commenting on the partnership, Dan Richardson, TfI's Managing Director, said, "NUI Galway is an innovator in technology transfer. We want to quickly establish ourselves as a valuable partner for the University and hope that this will be the start of a long-term relationship." The Technology Transfer Office at NUI Galway, is the longest established facility of its kind in Ireland. - ends - Notes for editors Technology from Ideas (TfI) Technology from Ideas (TfI) is a new Irish technology commercialisation company partnered by key players in universities and industry. TfI locates unrealised ideas from university researchers, develops them into investment ready technologies, and sells them to customers worldwide for subsequent development into products. This is achieved through commercially focused development in our own laboratories and together with sales through established technology development company partners. For more information please visit www.technologyfromideas.com. Tel Dan Richardson, Managing Director on +353 86 172 4623.

>> Read full story about First in series of industry agreements for NUI Galway

International Language and Law Conference – 'Give greater protection to the worl

International Language and Law Conference – 'Give greater protection to the worl-image

Monday, 12 June 2006

Galway, 14-17 June NUI Galway An international, trilingual (English, French and Irish) conference will take place in NUI Galway, organised by Acadamh na hOllscolaíochta Gaeilge and the Irish Centre for Human Rights and sponsored by the Department of Community, Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs from 14 to 17 June in the Millennium Arts Building. The theme of the conference is: Language Law and Language Rights: The Challenges of Enactment and Implementation. Delegates from over 20 countries will attend to discuss and debate law and language. "The conference is an excellent opportunity for the Gaeltacht, Acadamh na hOllscolaíochta Gaeilge and NUI Galway to take a key role in the national and international debate on language and human rights, and to highlight the situation of the Irish language as a positive example of what can be achieved," said Seosamh Mac Donnacha, Academic Coordinator, Acadamh na hOllscolaíochta Gaeilge. He continued, "The Irish language is now a working language of the European Union, and the Official Languages Act is currently being implemented. It is a chance for us all, also, to learn from the experience in other countries." The Conference will call on UNESCO and the United Nations to give greater protection to minority languages around the world. Keynote speakers include: Éamon Ó Cuív, Minister of Community, Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs Séan Ó Cuirreáin, an Coimisinéir Teanga/The Language Commissioner Philip Blair, Director, Directorate of Cooperation for Local and Regional Democracy, Council of Europe Dzenana Hadziomerovic, Legal Advisor to the High Commissioner for National Minorities Fernand de Varennes, Australian expert For more information and to register, see http://www.conference.ie/Conferences/index.asp?Conference=24 Contact/teagmháil: Áine Uí Ghiollagáin spokesperson/urlabhraí 10th International Conference on Language and Law 10ú Comhdháil Idirnáisiúnta ar Theanga agus Dlí Acadamh na hOllscolaíochta Gaeilge Gaillimh 091 595987 087 68 22 517 -ends-

>> Read full story about International Language and Law Conference – 'Give greater protection to the worl

Comhdháil Idirnáisiúnta ar Theanga agus Dlí – 'Tabhar cosaint níos fearr ag mion

Comhdháil Idirnáisiúnta ar Theanga agus Dlí – 'Tabhar cosaint níos fearr ag mion-image

Monday, 12 June 2006

Gaillimh 14-17 Meithimh in OEG Beidh comhdháil idirnáisiúnta trítheangach (Gaeilge, Béarla agus Fraincis) ag dul ar aghaidh in Ollscoil na hÉireann Gaillimh, eagraithe ag Acadamh na hOllscolaíochta Gaeilge agus an tIonad Éireannach um Chearta an Duine agus urraithe ag Roinn Gnóthaí Pobail, Tuaithe agus Gaeltachta idir 14 agus 17 Meithimh in Áras Dán na Mílaoise. Téama na Comhdhála ná 'Na Dúshláin a Bhaineann le hAchtú agus le Cur i bhFeidhm Dlí agus Cearta Teanga'. Tiocfadh toscairí as níos mó ná 20 tír i láthair chun ceisteanna dlí agus teanga á phlé. "Is deis iontach don Ghaeltacht, d Acadamh na hOllscolaíochta Gaeilge agus d Ollscoil na hÉireann Gaillimh páirt lárnach a thógáil sna díospóireachtaí náisiúnta agus idirnáisiúnta faoi cearta teanga agus cearta daonna, agus chun cás na Gaeilge a chur chun solais mar shámpla ceannródaíoch", a duirt Seosamh Mac Donnacha, Comhordaitheoir Acadúla, Acadamh na hOllscolaíochta Gaeilge, faoin gComhdháil. "Tá stádas bainte amach ag an nGaeilge mar theanga oibre san Eorap, agus tá Acht na dTeangacha Oifigiúla á chur i bhfeidhm faoi láthair. Is seans duinn ar fad, áfach, foghlaim faoin taithí atá sna tíortha eile." Glaofar ar UNESCO agus ar na Náisiúin Aontaithe chun cosaint níos fearr a thabhairt do mionteangacha an domhain. I measc na h-aoíchainteoirí tá: Éamon Ó Cuív, Aire Gnóthaí Pobail, Tuaithe agus Gaeltachta Séan Ó Cuirreáin, an Coimisinéir Teanga Philip Blair, stiúrthóir, Directorate of Cooperation for Local and Regional Democracy, Comhdháil na hEorpa Dzenana Hadziomerovic, comhairleoir dlí ag an Ard-Coimisinéir ar Mhionlaigh Náisiúnta Fernand de Varennes, saineolaí Astrálach Tuilleadh eolais agus clárúchán ar: http://www.conference.ie/Conferences/index.asp?Conference=24 Contact/teagmháil: Áine Uí Ghiollagáin spokesperson/urlabhraí 10th International Conference on Language and Law 10ú Comhdháil Idirnáisiúnta ar Theanga agus Dlí Acadamh na hOllscolaíochta Gaeilge Gaillimh 091 595987 087 68 22 517 -críoch-

>> Read full story about Comhdháil Idirnáisiúnta ar Theanga agus Dlí – 'Tabhar cosaint níos fearr ag mion

<< < 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 > >>

Featured Stories