Economics

Economics at NUI Galway provides a flourishing and diverse academic environment which integrates teaching and research, theory and empirical applications, in a policy-oriented and interdisciplinary way. There are approximately 1,800 undergraduate students of economics across several colleges, but mainly in the College of Business, Public Policy, and Law and in the College of Arts, Celtic Studies, and Social Sciences.

Timetables/student handbook 2014/15

Welcome to all students, whether new or returning, for the start of academic year 2014/15!

Economics timetables, for undergraduate (including international) students and for postgraduate economics programmes, as well as our economics student handook, are now online in our 'current students' section: 

Please note timetables are provisional: any revisions will be advised in class, and posted here.

Enquiries to economics@nuigalway.ie

European Commission highlight work by SEMRU

European Commission highlight work by SEMRU-image

Monday, 20 October 2014

The work of researchers in SEMRU (the Socio-Economic Marine Research Unit) at NUI Galway has been highlighted in the latest (October 2014) issue of Science for Environment Policy, published by the European Commission’s Directorate-General Environment. This regular publication provides a comprehensive look at the latest science policy topics, and is designed to “help policymakers keep up-to-date with the latest environmental research findings needed to design, implement and regulate effective policies”. The summary report on the SEMRU research can be downloaded here.    

>> Read full story about European Commission highlight work by SEMRU

Report on the economics of stroke rehabilitation services in Ireland

Report on the economics of stroke rehabilitation services in Ireland-image

Monday, 13 October 2014

Dr. Paddy Gillespie of Economics at NUI Galway, in collaboration with researchers at the Economic and Social Research Institute, Irish Heart Foundation, King College London, and Royal College of Surgeons of Ireland, have published a report which examines the cost and cost effectiveness of early supported discharge (ESD) for stroke rehabilitation in Ireland.  ESD is an intensive approach to rehabilitation in the community used internationally but not generally available in Ireland. The research found that 54% of stroke survivors in Ireland – more than 3,000 people a year – could benefit from ESD programmes that would reduce hospital bed days by 24,000, resulting in annual net savings of from €2 to €7 million, while improving outcomes for patients. According to the new report titled Towards Earlier Discharge, Better Outcomes, Lower Cost: Stroke Rehabilitation in Ireland, implementing Early Supported Discharge would require a substantial increase in the resourcing of community therapists (physiotherapists, occupational therapists, and speech and language therapists), community nurses and other community care above current levels in Ireland. However, savings from the reduced cost of acute bed days could fund this increase in resourcing. The research found that there is currently poor resourcing of and wide regional variation in community and inpatient rehabilitation for stroke survivors in Ireland. For more, see: ESRI news release on this report View publication details (and link to download) at ESRI Health Economics and Policy Group at NUI Galway

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Pioneering study of dementia therapy at NUI Galway

Pioneering study of dementia therapy at NUI Galway-image

Wednesday, 1 October 2014

A pioneering trial run jointly by the Irish Centre for Social Gerontology led by Professor Eamon O’Shea at the the Irish Centre for Social Gerontology (ICSG) and Economics at NUI Galway, and the School of Nursing and Midwifery at NUI Galway headed by Professor Kathy Murphy entitled "DementiA education programme incorporating REminiscence for Staff (DARES)" has highlighted the potential of talking and remembering earlier times as a means of therapy for people with dementia, based on a study of three hundred people with dementia carried out over a period of three years. It is estimated that there are 50,000 people with dementia in Ireland today with an additional 4,000 new cases every year, which will increase from now on as people are living longer. Dementia is the term used to describe a group of symptoms such as memory loss, language difficulties, confusion and disorientation which affect some people, usually in older age. It is not always clear why some people get dementia and others do not, nor can it be easily predicted, although there may be a genetic component and lifestyle is an influence on some types of dementia. Dementia is an expensive condition for families and the State. The annual financial burden of the disease has been estimated by researchers at NUI Galway to be 1.7 billion euros, with significant burden falling on family carers, who provide most of the care. Whilst much of the treatment of people with dementia to date has been pharmacological, studies have shown that psychosocial interventions can also be beneficial.  Reminiscence is increasingly seen as important in the care and support of people with dementia, given its potential to draw on early memories, which often remain intact for people with dementia, thereby highlighting the person’s preserved abilities rather than any cognitive impairment. Despite being widely used in dementia care, evidence on the effectiveness of reminiscence remains uncertain. The DARES trial involved using reminiscence therapy for people with dementia in long-stay care settings in the West of Ireland. The therapy involved the use of photographs, music, mementos and memorabilia to people with dementia to encourage them to talk about their earlier life. The intervention was a structured education reminiscence-based programme for care staff, who subsequently engaged in individualised reminiscence with long-stay residents under their care. The primary research question focused on the impact of reminiscence therapy on the self-reported quality of life of residents with a diagnosis of dementia. The results showed that reminiscence therapy has a positive effect on people with dementia in long term residential care.  Reminiscence can also improve the quality of the care and support that people with dementia receive as new relationships and connections are formed with staff, who are now more aware of the identity and  personhood of  the person for whom they care.   Find out more: Irish Centre for Social Gerontology School of Nursing & Midwifery      

>> Read full story about Pioneering study of dementia therapy at NUI Galway

SEMRU joins major EU programme for regional development

SEMRU joins major EU programme for regional development -image

Tuesday, 30 September 2014

SEMRU, the Socio-Economic Marine Research Unit at NUI Galway, has joined a number of partners in a major new EU funding programme. SEMRU joins the University of Portsmouth, UK, Technopôle Brest-Iroise, France and the BC3 Basque Centre for Climate Change, Spain as the focal points for a new EU funded Assistance Mechanism for the Atlantic Action Plan (AAP). The AAP has identified four focus areas for research and investment to tackle common challenges. These are: Promote entrepreneurship and innovation. Protect, secure and develop the potential of the Atlantic marine and coastal environment. Improve accessibility and connectivity. Create a socially inclusive and sustainable model of regional development. While addressing these challenges, an important operational objective for the AAP is to avoid overlaps with individual countries’ policies and plans concerning the development of their marine and maritime economies. Hence, the AAP is required to enhance and work effectively alongside existing policy frameworks that are active in the AAP territories. The Assistance Mechanism for the AAP is tasked with communicating and implementing these objectives of the AAP. The project will run until April 2016. The team members of SEMRU at NUI Galway involved in the project are: Dr. Stephen Hynes  and Dr. Amaya Vega. See more: SEMRU Socio-Economic Marine Research Unit at NUI Galway  

>> Read full story about SEMRU joins major EU programme for regional development

Rethinking how we address the costs of disability

Rethinking how we address the costs of disability-image

Friday, 26 September 2014

Dr. John Cullinan of Economics at NUI Galway recently delivered a paper at an Inclusion Ireland conference on the economic cost of disability.  His research shows that the economic cost of disability in Ireland is large and has a significantly negative impact on the living standards of the disabled and their families.  It suggests that current policy in Ireland does not go far enough in addressing the impact of these extra costs and that it is time to think again about the introduction of a cost of disability payment for those most adversely impacted by such costs. See media coverage of this event (Irish Examiner story)  

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SEMRU symposium on marine socio-economics in Galway

SEMRU symposium on marine socio-economics in Galway-image

Thursday, 25 September 2014

On Tuesday October 21st 2014, the Socio-Economic Marine Research Unit (SEMRU), NUI Galway will hold its 5th annual research symposium in Galway. The symposium is an opportunity for researchers and policy-makers in marine socio-economics to get together to meet and discuss on-going research. The day is divided up into four sessions, and will cover topics such as valuing the ocean and coastal economies, maritime transport, fisheries and ocean energy, marine spatial planning ... and more! The symposium will include presentations by researchers involved in the Beaufort Award across the sessions of the day. A programme is available here There will also be a Marnet project session where the practical uses of marine socio-economic data collected across the Atlantic Arc EU member States will be presented. Marnet is a marine socio economic transnational EU INTERREG project which is supported by the EU Atlantic Area Interreg Programme. For more information on the Marnet project, see http://www.marnetproject.eu The Beaufort Award is carried out under the Sea Change Strategy and the Strategy for Science Technology and Innovation (2006-2013), with the support of the Marine Institute, funded under the Marine Research Sub-Programme of the National Development Plan 2007–2013. This is a free event and all are welcome. Please register hereby Friday 17th October 2014.  For more information, please contact rebecca.corless@nuigalway.ie See more: SEMRU at NUI Galway Conference programme    

>> Read full story about SEMRU symposium on marine socio-economics in Galway

"The Big Rethink for Europe"

Wednesday, 16 July 2014

Professor Alan Ahearne, Head of Economics, recently spoke at The Economist’s 18th Roundtable with the Government of Greece, “The Big Rethink for Europe,” in Athens. Prof. Ahearne shared a panel with Enrico Letta, Former Prime Minister of Italy, and Daniel Franklin, Executive Editor, The Economist (pictured). The discussion centred on the need for EU leaders to implement their strategy for closer economic and political integration in order to restore confidence and stability.  

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Forthcoming events


Wed 29th Oct 2014 1.01 PM CA117 (MBA Room)
'Brown bag' seminar A gravity model of student flows to higher education institutions
John Cullinan NUI Galway

Fri 31st Oct 2014 2.00 PM CA111 Lecture Hall 1
Economics seminar Flooded Cities: Restoration or Adaptation
Tom McDermott LSE

Tue 4th Nov 2014 8.00 AM Aula Maxima
Conference Pricing Healthcare
Convenor: Mr. Brendan Kennelly

View all events

Head of Economics

Prof Alan Ahearne

Contact Economics

t:+353 91 492501/492177

e: economics@nuigalway.ie