We offer Philosophy at undergraduate level as part of a BA (Joint-Honours) degree. Visit NUI Galway's Courses Page for information on how to apply, entry requirements and assessment.

 

Current Students

First Year

Please make sure you are familiar with our policies on Essay deadlines and penalties.

First Year Modules 2019/2020

  • Introduction to the History of Philosophy
  • Introduction to Practical Ethics
  • Critical Thinking & Persuasive Writing
  • Philosophical Questions & Issues

Timetables

‌‌

Staff Representative for First Years:   

Dr. Richard Hull for Semester One: richard.hull@nuigalway.ie
Dr. Gerald Cipriani for Semester Two:gerald.cipriani@nuigalway.ie

Student Representatives for First Years:   TBA

:  Email address:
: Email address:
:  Email address: 
 : Email address:

Dates of Semesters (Teaching)

   Semester One:   Orientation 2nd September, 2019 - 6th September, 2019

                                        Teaching:     9th September, 2019 - 30th November, 2019

                                         Study Week:    2nd December, 2019 - 7th December, 2019

                                         Semester 1 Exams:   9th December, 2019 - 20th  December,  2019.

   Semester Two:   Teaching:      13th January, 2020 - 4th April,  2020

                                        Study Week:  14th April, 2020 - 20th April, 2020

                                        Semester 2 Exams:   21st April, 2020 - 8th May, 2020

Autumn Exams:      4th August, 2020  - 14th August, 2020.

Sign up for your first year tutorials on Blackboard  under PI108 Introduction to Practical Ethic's module.     The link to the list of tutorials is on the left hand side under Tutorials.     Registration will be open on the 16th September, 2019 and the tutorials will commence the week (TBA)

Compulsory/Optional Courses:

All courses are compulsory for B.A. students (Joint Honours).     B.A. Connect students do not have to take PI120 Philosophical Questions and Issues.

Schedule of Courses:

Compulsory

Code

Course

Semester

ECTS

Examination

PI108

Introduction to Practical Ethics

1

5

Written Essay at the end of the Semester.

PI107

Introduction to History of Philosophy

2

5

2 hour written examination.
Essay work may be required.

PISK1100

Critical Thinking & Persuasive Writing

1 & 2

5

Exam/Essay

PI120

Philosophical Questions and Issues

1 & 2

5

Essay/Essay

Individual Course Details:

Introduction to History of Philosophy

Code

Semester

Contact hours / weekly

ECTS

PI107

2

2 (Tutorials not included)

5

Lecturer:  Dr. O. Richardson

Course description:

The course will introduce students to key thinkers and ideas in the history of western philosophy. Since ancient philosophy is so central to this history, the first half of the course is devoted to some of its most important achievements in the work of the Pre-Socratics, Plato, and Aristotle. Attention is then turned to aspects of medieval philosophy, and the great rationalist and empiricist traditions (represented by Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz, and Locke and Hume, respectively). Lectures will also be offered on Kant, Nietzsche, and the analytic and phenomenological traditions

Prerequisites: None

Teaching and learning methods: The course is lecture-based, supplemented by tutorials.

Methods of assessment and examination:  Overall assessment is by written exam at the end of second semester.   Mid-term assignment may be required.

Core text:  
Copleston, History of Philosophy, Image Publishing
Guthrie, W. K. C., The Greek Philosophers from Thales to Aristotle, Methuen
Johnston, D., A Brief History of Philosophy, Continuum
Plato, Republic, Penguin
Russell, B., History of Western Philosophy, Routledge
Solomon, R. and Higgins, K., A Short History of Philosophy, Oxford
Stumpf, S. E., and Fieser, J., Socrates to Sartre and Beyond, McGraw Hill

Introduction to Practical Ethics 

Code

Semester

Contact hours / weekly

ECTS

PI108

1

2 (Tutorials not included)

5

Lecturer: Dr. R. Hull

Course description: This course (Practical Ethics) provides a rigorous, but non-technical examination of a wide range of contemporary ethical issues. Indicative issues discussed include discrimination, free speech, sexuality, life and death, punishment and justice.  Excerpts will be taken from the core texts listed below.

Prerequisites: None

Teaching and learning methods: The course is lecture-based, supplemented by tutorials.

Methods of assessment and examination: Overall assessment is by written essay at the end of the first  semester. Written course work (essay) - if required is added to the evaluation

Core texts:
Andrew I. Cohen  and Christopher Heath Wellman, eds., Contemporary Debates in Applied Ethics (Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell, 2005). 
Peter Singer, Practical Ethics (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011).
Hugh La Follette, ed., The Oxford Handbook of Practical Ethics (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005).
Hugh La Follette, ed., Ethics in Practice: An Anthology (Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell, 2006). 

Critical Thinking & Persuasive Writing 

Code

Semester

Contact hours / weekly

ECTS

PISK1100

1 & 2

2 (Tutorials not included)

5

Lecturer:  Dr. N. Tosh

Course description: Successful humanities students are sophisticated consumers and producers of arguments.   In this key skills module students will learn to distinguish arguments from other forms of persuasion; to map the argumentative structure of a complex text; to spot fallacious patterns of reasoning; and to plan and compose a strong argumentative essay.    Since these skills are not topic-specific, illustrations will be drawn from a range of academic disciplines.  No knowledge of philosophy will be assumed.

Prerequisites: None

Teaching and learning methods: The course is lecture-based, supplemented by tutorials.

Methods of assessment and examination:  Overall assessment is by an exam at the end of the first semester and an essay at the end of the second semester  Mid-term assignment may be required.

Core text:        
Fisher, A. (2011). Critical Thinking: An Introduction.
Bowell, T. and Kemp, G. (2010). Critical Thinking: A Concise Guide.

 
Philosophical Questions & Issues 

Code

Semester

Contact hours / weekly

ECTS

PI120

1 & 2

2 (Tutorials not included)

5

Lecturers:  Ms. L. Elvis & Dr. R. Hull                                       -  Semester One
                          Ms. L. Elvis & Dr. N. Tosh                                     -  Semester Two         

Course description: This course aims to introduce students to a diversity of philosophical approaches to the problem of meaning and value.   Issues covered will include some of the following: justice, poverty, love, death, genetics and human life, human rights, free will, violence and the meaning of life.

Prerequisites: None

Teaching and learning methods: The course is lecture-based, supplemented by tutorials.

Methods of assessment and examination:  Overall assessment is by an essay at the end of the first semester and an essay at the end of the second semester.  Mid-term assignment may be required.

Core text:
Law, S., The Philosophy Gym., chapters 3,5,12
Pink, T., Free Will: A very Short Introduction
Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics, Various editions ED.
Bretall, R (ed.), A Kierkegaard Anthology
Plato, Symposium, various editions Ed.
De Beauvoir, The Second Sex
Barry, B., Democracy, power and justice
Glover, J., Choosing Children
Kymlicka, W, Contemporary Political Philosophy
Singer, P., A Companion to Ethics
Wolff, J., An Introduction to Political Philosophy,
John Locke, : “Of Identity and Diversity” (II. Xxvii), in Essay on Human Understanding    

Second Year

Entry requirements: A pass in First Arts Philosophy or its equivalent in the case of exchange and visiting students

Dates of Semesters (Teaching) 2019/2020

Semester One:   Teaching:   9th September, 2019 - 30th November, 2019

                                     Study Week: 2nd  December, 2019 - 7th December, 2018

                                      Semester 1 Exams:  9th December, 2019 - 20th December, 2019

Semester Two:   Teaching: 13th January, 2020 - 4th April, 2020

                                     Study Week:   14th April, 2020 - 20th April, 2020

                                     Semester 2 Exams:   21st April, 2020 - 8th May, 2020

Autumn Exams:   4th August, 2020   -  14th August, 2020

Staff Representative for second arts:    

Dr. Nick Tosh.    Email address is nick.tosh@nuigalway.ie

Student Representatives for second arts:    

 TBA

Timetables:

‌‌

 Schedule of Courses:

For BA (Joint -Honours) students, six modules must be taken totalling 30 ECTS.    The Core module that must be taken is PI216 in Semester One. You must take two other Optional modules in that Semester 1.   In Second Semester, you must choose three Optional modules.

For BA Connect students need to take 25 ECTS for the whole year.     You must take PI216 in Semester One.   The most modules that can be taken in a semester is three.  

Compulsary

Code

Course

Semester

ECTS

Examination

PI216

History of Modern Philosophy

1

5

2 hour written examination

Optional

PI2101

Information Ethics

1

5

By essay

PI207

Philosophy of Art (Off-Line)

1

5

By essay

PI210

Moral & Political Philosophy

1

5

By essay

PI2105

Philosophical Inquiry through P4C

1   

5   

Portifolio

PI240

Bioethics

2

5

By essay

PI2102

Formal Logic

2

5

2 hour written exam

PI247   

Nietzsche & Philosophy

2

5

By essay

PI2100

East Asian Philosophy & Culture (Off-LIne)

2

5

By essay

 

Individual Course Unit Details:

History of Modern Philosophy

Code

Semester

Contact hours / weekly

ECTS

PI216

1

2 (Tutorials not included)

5

Lecturers:  Dr. T. Doyle/Dr. N. Ward

Course Description:   Dr. N. Ward will examine the development of Rationalism from Descartes to Kant. Special attention will be paid to the rationalist attempt to give a systematic account of both human and non-human reality. Dr Doyle will examine the relation between empirical science and metaphysics in the eighteenth century period of Enlightenment, with particular emphasis on the philosophies of Hume and Kant.

Prerequisites: None

Teaching and learning methods: The course is lecture-based, supplemented by tutorials.

Methods of assessment and examination: Overall assessment is based on written examination. Written course work (essay) - if required - is added to the evaluation.

Core Texts:
Selected passages from the following text will be considered:
Roger Ariew & Eric Watkins (eds) Modern Philosophy: An Anthology of Primary Sources (Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing Co., 1998).

Moral & Political Philosophy

 

Code

Semester

Contact hours / weekly

ECTS

PI210

1

2 (Tutorials not included)

5

Lecturer: Dr. Orla Richardson

Course description:   This course is an introduction to several important topics and questions in political and moral philosophy, such as:   What, if anything, legitimises governmental authority and the exercise of political power?    What is justice?   What is the nature of citizenship?   Is a free market a necessary component of a free society?   What principles ground our fundamental notions of property rights, freedom and equality?   To explore these questions, we will begin by reading extracts from the Ancients, primarily Plato and Aristotle.    We will then examine the ideas of Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau and Kant.   Finally, we will review texts by more contemporary authors, including Rawls, Nozick and Foucault.   Overall, the aim of this course is to trace the ideas that have shaped our contemporary political systems and to equip us to think critically about what conditions make 'the good society' possible.

Prerequisites: None

Teaching and learning methods: The course is lecture-based, supplemented by tutorials.

Methods of assessment and evaluation:   Weekly submission of discussion question.  (10 questions in total).  Each discussion question is worth 3% = total of 30%.   The final essay at the end of the first semester is worth 70%.

Core Texts:
Excerpts will be taken mainly from the following source:  
Steven M. Cahn, ed.,  Classics of Political and Moral Philosophy (Oxford University Press, 2011) 

Philosophy of Art (Off-Line)

It has been decided that this course Philosophy of Art will run in the Academic Year 2019/2020.   You cannot register for it the on-line registration.    You need to inform Ann O'Higgins, Room 311, First Floor, Tower One, Concourse by coming in person to the said office or by emailing ann.ohiggins@nuigalway.ie as soon as you have decided on your courses.

Code 

Semester

Contact hours / weekly

ECTS

PI207

1

2 (Tutorials not included)

5

Lecturer:    Ms. L. Elvis

Course description:

This module is an introduction to philosophical approaches to various artforms across Western
history of ideas. It gives students the skills to rigourously understand relevant key texts as well as
critically discuss them in relation to a range of art practices and artworks. Whether pre-modern,
modern, or contemporary, the philosophical approaches considered cover a variety of methods
including from the analytic and interpretive traditions. Similarly, the artforms discussed span a
variety of historical periods, movements and categories.

Prerequisites: None

Teaching and learning methods: This course is lecture-based, supplemented by tutorials.

Methods of assessment and examination: Overall assessment is by essay at the end of the semester.   

Core Texts:

Gracyk, T.,, The Philosophy of Art, Polity Press
Carroll, N.,, Philosophy of Art: A Contemporary Introduction, Routledge
Hofstadter, A. and Kuhns, R.,, Philosophies of Art and Beauty: Selected Readings in Aesthetics from Plato to
Heidegger, University of Chicago Press
Bredin, H. and Santoro-Brienza, L.,, Philosophies of Art and Beauty: Introduction Aesthetics, Edinburgh
University Press.

 Introduction to Japanese Philosophy & Culture (Off-Line)

It has been decided that this course Introduction to Japanese Philosophy & Culture will not run in the Academic Year 2019/2020

Code 

Semester

Contact hours / weekly

ECTS

PI2103

1

2 (Tutorials not included)

5

Lecturer:   TBA

Course description: This module introduces students to Japanese philosophy from ancient, classical and medieval times to the end of the Tokugawa period in 1868. It examines the different philosophical trends and schools from within Buddhism to Shintoism and Neo-Confucianism. Importantly, the module seeks to explain the philosophy in relation to its cultural contexts.

Prerequisites: None

Teaching and learning methods: This course is lecture-based, supplemented by tutorials.

Methods of assessment and examination: Overall assessment is by essay at the end of the semester.   

Core Texts:

Heisig, J.W. and Kasulis, T.P. eds., Japanese Philosophy: A Sourcebook, University of Hawai‘i Press
Blocker, H.G. and Starling, C.L., Japanese Philosophy, SUNY Press
Hume, N. G. ed., Japanese Aesthetics and Culture, SUNY Press.

Introduction to Chinese Philosophy & Culture (Off-Line)

It has been decided that this course Introduction to Chinese Philosophy & Culture will not run in the Academic Year 2019/2020.

Code 

Semester

Contact hours / weekly

ECTS

PI2104

1

2 (Tutorials not included)

5

Lecturer:  TBA

Course description: This module introduces students to Chinese philosophy from its early worldviews starting in circa 2000 BCE, to the “Hundred Schools of Thought” (Confucianism, Daoism, Mohism, Legalism), Buddhism, and Neo-Confucianism until the beginning of the 20th century. Importantly, the module seeks to explain the philosophy in relation to its cultural contexts.

Prerequisites: None

Teaching and learning methods: This course is lecture-based, supplemented by tutorials.

Methods of assessment and examination: Overall assessment is by essay at the end of the semester.   

Core Texts:

Fung, Y.-L, A Short History of Chinese Philosophy, The Free Press
Lai, K., An Introduction to Chinese Philosophy, Cambridge University Press
Chan, Wing-T, A Source Book in Chinese Philosophy, Princeton University Press
Li, Z., The Chinese Aesthetic Tradition, University of Hawai‘i Press 

Information Ethics

Code

Semester

Contact hours / weekly

ECTS

PI2101

1

2 (Tutorials not included)

5

Lecturer: Dr. H.  Felzmann

Course description: This module aims to provide students with a critical understanding of current and emerging ethical concerns in relation to the internet, big data and robotics, including issues such as online identity, privacy and robot-human interactions.  Philosophical reflection of core concepts will underlie the discussion of emerging concerns.  Preparation of weekly readings is an essential requirement for participation.

Prerequisites: None

Teaching and learning methods: This course is lecture-based, supplemented by tutorials.

Methods of assessment and examination: Overall assessment is by essay.

Core Texts:
Luciano Floridi (Ed) 2010, The Cambridge Handbook of information and Computer Ethics
Helen Nissenbaum 2009, Privacy in Context: Technology, Policy and integrity of Social Life, Stanford University Press.

Philosophical Inquiry through P4C

Code

Semester

Contact hours / weekly

ECTS

PI2105

1

2 (Tutorials not included)

5

Lecturers:   Dr. O. Richardson, Ms. L. Elvis

Course description:   This module focuses on an educational approach to learning called Philosophy for Children (P4C).   P4C is a form of inquiry-based learning that encourages critical thinking through democratic dialogue. It fosters critical, creative, and caring thinking skills amongst all types of learners.  Through this pedagogy, groups of learners become 'communities of inquiry', tackling philosophical questions they themselves identify and formulate.   Through thinking together, these communities learn to challenge assumptions, give reasons and cultivate their critical thinking skills.   The module will provide students with a theoretical introduction to the P4C pedagogy, the opportunity to experience the pedagogy as members of a community of inquiry, and the skills needed to become a P4C facilitator.   Students will develop their own facilitation practice by delivering P4C sessions to groups of NUIG 1st year philosophy students on campus at NUIG.Instructors: Dr. Orla Richardson, Ms. Lucy Elvis.

Prerequisites: None.  Please note below.

1.   This module is capped at 18 students.   If you would like to be considered for a place you must complete an expression of interest form.   The EOI must be completed and submitted by 5pm on Monday 16/09/19.    The form is available here.  

2.  There will be a weekend training event on the 21st and 22nd of September.   Attendance at this training event is compulsory for any student registered for PI2105.

Teaching and learning methods:  This course is taught through a mixture of lectures and seminar-based learning.

 Module Texts:  You are not required to purchase a textbook. All extracts from primary texts will be available on Blackboard. However, there is a list of suggested preparatory core readings below:

Gregory, Maughn, Joanna Haynes, and Karin Murris. The Routledge International Handbook of Philosophy for Children. New York: Routledge, 2017.

Gregory, Laverty, Gregory, Maughn, and Laverty, Megan. In Community of Inquiry with Ann Margaret Sharp: Childhood, Philosophy and Education. Routledge International Studies in the Philosophy of Education, 2018.

 Lipman, Matthew. Thinking in Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003.

 Lipman, Matthew, Ann Margaret Sharp, and Frederick S. Oscanyan. Philosophy in the Classroom. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, [Pa.]: Temple University Press, 1980

Lyons, A., McIlrath, L. & Munck, R. Higher Education and Civic Engagement: Comparative Perspectives. UK: Palgrave MacMillan, 2012.

 Naji, Rosnani Hashim, and Naji, Saeed. History, Theory and Practice of Philosophy for Children: International Perspectives. Routledge Research in Education. 2017. 

 Module Assessment:

1) Satisfactory participation in all classes - including assigned facilitation of P4C workshops - is required.

 2) Students are required to submit a detailed “theory-to-practice” journal.   In this journal, students will engage in theoretical reflection on the P4C pedagogy in response to short readings and will assess the impact of that reflection on their classroom practices. 

(3)  Book module and associated lesson plan.

 Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art  (Off-Line)

It has been decided that this course Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art will not run in the Academic Year 2019/2020.

Code

Semester

Contact hours / weekly

ECTS

PI255

2

2 (Tutorials not included)

Lecturer: Dr. G. Cipriani

Course description:  This module introduces students to key thinkers, topics and debated in the understanding of our aesthetic responses to art and nature.    It give particular emphasis to the ontological and cognitive bases of different art forms and to the condition of their critical evaluation.

Prerequisites: None

Teaching and learning methods:   This course is lecture based - supplemented by tutorials

Methods of assessment and examination: Overall assessment is by essay.

Core Texts:
Clive Cazeaux,  The Continental Aesthetics Reader.
Joseph Tanke and Colin McQuillan, The Bloomsbury Anthology of Aesthetics.
Jerrold Levinson, Oxford Handbook of Aesthetics.
Berys Gaut and Dominic McIver Lopes, The Routledge Companion to Aesthetics.
Stephen David Ross, Art and its Significance.
Paul Crowhter, Defining Art, Creating the Canon.
Colin Lyas,  Aesthetics.
Gordon Graham, Philosophy of the Arts:    An Introduction to Aesthetics.

 Bioethics

Code

Semester

Contact hours / weekly

ECTS

PI240

2

2 (Tutorials not included)

5

Lecturer:   Dr. N. Ward

Course description: This seminar is concerned with contemporary issues in Bioethics.  It will introduce a variety of normative ethical theories to provide a foundation for the critical analysis of a range of issues arising from the biological and medical sciences. These are likely to include abortion, euthanasia/physician assisted suicide, disability, genetic modification and resource allocation. It is intended that students will gain knowledge of moral philosophy that equips them to evaluate some of the most pressing dilemmas facing biomedical practice.

Prerequisites:  None

Teaching and learning methods: The course is lecture-based, supplemented by tutorials

Methods of assessment and evaluation: Overall assessment is by essay

Core texts:      
Beauchamp, T., & Childress, J., Principles of Biomedical Ethics, OUP, 1994.
Singer, P. (Ed), A Companion to Ethics, Blackwell, 1993.

 Formal Logic

Code

Semester

Contact hours / weekly

ECTS

PI2102

2

2 (Tutorials not included)

5

Lecturer: Dr. N. Tosh

Course description: Formal logic is the systematic study of deductive reasoning. It is motivated by such questions as 'what does it mean to say that a piece of reasoning is "correct"?', 'how can we tell when a piece of reasoning is correct?', and 'could we program a machine to do the job for us?' The course begins with the concept of validity, and then moves on to cover sentence logic, truth tables, natural deduction, and elementary predicate logic. Throughout, we lean heavily on Paul Teller's Logic Primer, now freely available online (https://tellerprimer.ucdavis.edu/). No previous knowledge is assumed, but good study habits are essential. Readings and practice exercises will be set each week, and students who fall behind may find it difficult to catch up.

Prerequisites: None

Teaching and learning methods: This course is lecture-based, supplemented by tutorials.

Methods of assessment and examination: Overall assessment is by written exam.

Core Texts: 
Paul Teller, A Modern Formal Logic Primerhttps://tellerprimer.ucdavis.edu/

 East Asian Philosophy & Culture (Off-Line)

It has been decided that this course East Asian Philosophy & Culture  will run in the Academic Year 2019/2020.   You cannot register for it the on-line registration.    You need to inform Ann O'Higgins, Room 311, First Floor, Tower One, Concourse by coming in person to the said office or by emailing ann.ohiggins@nuigalway.ie as soon as you have decided on your courses.

Code

Semester

Contact hours / weekly

ECTS

PI2100

2

2 (Tutorials not included)

5

Lecturer:   Dr. G. Cipriani

Course description: This module introduces the students to East Asian philosophy in relation to culture, mainly Chinese and Japanese.  The lectures are designed to make students aware of the basics of fundamental philosophical and cultural traditions such as Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism and Shinto.    The lectures also explore the ways such traditions have been reinterpreted in contemporary East Asian cultures when exposed to Western ideas for example in Maoism or The Kyoto School.

Prerequisites: None

Teaching and learning methods: This course is lecture-based, supplemented by tutorials.

Methods of assessment and examination: Overall assessment is by written essay

Core Texts: 
Koller, J.M. & P. 1991, A Sourcebook in Asian Philosophy
Bresnan, P.S. 2007, Awakening : An Introduction to the History of Eastern Thought
Koller, J.M. 2007, Asian Philosophies
Fung, Y.-L. 1997, A Short History of Chinese Philosophy
Izutsu Toshihiko (1982), Toward a Philosophy of Zen Buddhism
Heisig, J.W. and Kasulis, T.P. (2011), Japanese Philosophy: A Sourcebook

Nietzsche & Philosophy

Code

Semester

Contact hours / weekly

ECTS

PI247

2

2 (Tutorials not included)

5

Lecturer:    Dr. T. Doyle

Course Description:  This course shall introduce students to some of the central themes informing the philosophical writings of Friedrich Nietzsche.   Comprising a close reading of his writings' it offers students an opportunity to explore such concepts as perspectivism, the will to power, nihilism, the death of God, master and slave morality, genealogy, the Ubermensch and eternal recurrence.  Nietzsche's response to traditional philosophical problems of truth and knowledge and his use of the language of falsification and illusion shall also be considered.   All students shall be expected to engage in class discussions.

Prerequisities:   None

Teaching and Learning Methods:   This course is lecture-based, supplemented by tutorials.

Methods of Assessment and Examination:   Overall assessment is by written essay.

Core Texts:
Ansell Pearson, Keith and Large, Duncan (eds) 2006,  The Nietzsche Reader, Blackwell.
Clarke, Maudemarie 1990, Nietzsche on Truth and Philosophy, Cambridge University Press.
Ansell Pearson, Keith, (ed.) 2006, A companion to Nietzsche, Blackwell.
May, Simon 1999, Nietzsche's Ethics and his War on 'Morality', Clarendon Press.
Schacht, Richard 1983, Nietzsche, Routledge and Kegan Paul.
Solomon, Robert C., and Higgins, Kathleen m. 1988, Reading Nietzsche, Oxford University Press.

Final Year

Entry requirements: A pass in Second Arts Philosophy or its equivalent in the case of visiting and exchange students. Students registered for the B.A. (International) must also have attained a satisfactory academic performance during their year abroad.

Dates of Semesters (Teaching) 2019/2020

Semester One:    Teaching:  9th September, 2019 -  30th November, 2019

                                       Study Week:   2nd December,  2019 - 7th  December, 2019

                                       Semester 1 Exams:   9th December, 2019 - 20th December, 2019

Semester Two:      Teaching: 13th January, 2020 -  4th April, 2020

                                         Study Week:   14th  April, 2020 - 20th April, 2019

                                          Semester 2 Exams:   21st  April, 2020 - 8th  May, 2020.

Autumn Exams:     4th August, 2020      -    14th August 2020.

Staff Representative for Third Arts:

Dr. Heike Felzmann:   Email address is heike.felzmann@nuigalway.ie

Student Representative for Third Arts:  TBA   

:   Email address is

 

Timetables:

‌‌‌

Optional Courses:

Six of the following courses are to be taken. At least three modules must be taken in each semester.  

Schedule of Courses:

Code

Course

Semester

ECTS

Examination

PI3100

 

Kant's Theoretical Philosophy

1

5

Continuous Assessment plus an essay to be submitted at the end of semester 1.

PI335

Moral Theory

1

5

Continual Assessment plus an essay

PI315

Philosophy of Mind

1

5

By essay

PI310

Topics in Applied Philosophy

1

5

By essay.

PI246

American Pragmatism

1

5

2 hour written examination. Essay work may be required.          

 

PI3102

Contemporary East Asian Philosophy (Off-Line)

2

5

By essay

PI234                      Topics in Practical Philosophy   5 By essay 

PI129

Advanced Philosophical Text

2

5

By essay

PI241

History of Irish Thought

2

5

By essay

PI399

Extended Essay

2

5

By essay

 

Individual Course Unit Details:

 Moral Theory

Code

Semester

Contact hours / weekly

ECTS

PI335

1

2 (Tutorials not included)

5

Lecturer:  Dr. H. Felzmann

Course description: This course will introduce students to the principal positions in contemporary moral theory including consequentialism, deontology and virtue theory, drawing on core historical authors such as Mill, Kant, and Aristotle, as well as contemporary theories, such as the principle-based approach to bioethics, casuistry, care ethics and narrative ethics.  Preparation of weekly readings and willingness to participate constructively in class discussion are essential requirements for participation.

Prerequisites: None

Teaching and learning methods:  The course is lecture-based, supplemented by tutorials

Methods of assessment and evaluation: Overall assessment is based on continued assessment. Written course work (essay), if required, is added to the evaluation

Core text:
Mark Timmons, Moral Theory: An Introduction, Lanham, Md, Rowman & Littlefield, 2002.

 
Kant's Theoretical Philosophy

Code

Semester

Contact hours / weekly

ECTS

PI3100

1

2 (Tutorials not included)

5

Lecturer: Dr. T. Doyle

Course description: This module examines Kant's theoretical philosophy by focussing on his arguments for transcendental idealism in the Critique of Pure Reason.   Particular attention will be paid to Kant's ambitious aim to establish the objectivity of Newtonian science whilst leaving room for the possibility of God, freedom and immortality by focussing on his arguments for the transcendental ideality of space and time, his argument for the transcendental deduction of the categories, his distinction between phenomena and noumena, the argument of the Analogies and Antinomies.   The modules also incorporates a number of revision exercises to help with student learning and understanding of the text.

Teaching and learning methods: The course is lecture-based, supplemented by tutorials

Methods of assessment and examination: Overall assessment is based on a written  essay at the end of the semester.  Continuous Assessment  - is added to the evaluation

Core texts:
Selected passages from the following texts shall be considered:
Sebastian Gardner, Routledge philosophy guidebook to Kant and the Critique of Pure Reason, London; Routledge, 1999.
Kant, Immanuel, Critique of Pure Reason, (MacMillan, 1929), translated by Norman Kemp Smith.
James O'Shea, Kant's Critique of Pure Reason:  An Introduction, Acumen Publishing.
Jay F. Rosenberg, Accessing Kant, Clarendon Press; 2005. Oxford.
(A detailed list of readings will be distributed at the beginning of the course.)

Philosophy of Mind

Code

Semester

Contact hours / weekly

ECTS

PI315

1

2 (Tutorials not included)

5

Lecturer: Dr. J. O'Reilly

Course description: This course will consist in the analysis and discussion of a selection of the following topics:  the dualistic conception of the person; the critique of dualism; behaviourism as a philosophy of mind; the mind-brain identity theory; eliminative materialism; the 'mystery' of subjectivity; Searle's biological naturalism; the 'mental science' project; functionalism; artificial intelligence.

Prerequisites: None

Teaching and learning methods: The course is lecture-based, supplemented by tutorials

Methods of assessment and examination: Overall assessment is by an essay at the end of the semester.   Written course work (essay) - if required - is added to the evaluation

Core texts:  Jaegwon Kim 2011, Philosophy of Mind, Westview Press Colorado.
C.V. Borst (ed) 1970,  The Mind-Brain Identity Theory, The MacMillan Press.
Jerry A. Fodor 1975, The languge of thought, Crowell New York.
Ned Block 1980, Readings in Philosophy of Psychology, Harvard University Press.
Lawrence Shapiro 2011, Embodied Cognition, Routledge.

 
American Pragmatism

Code

Semester

Contact hours / weekly

ECTS

PI246

1

2 (Tutorials not included)

5

Lecturer:  Dr. T. Doyle

Course description: This course shall examine some of the central themes at the heart of American pragmatism.   We shall begin by addressing the historical and scientific background informing the emergence of the pragmatist movement in nineteenth-century America.   Taking the pragmatist denial of absolute beliefs as our guiding theme, the course shall explore the pragmatist writings of William James in the nineteenth-century and Richard Rorty in the twentieth-century.  In particular, we shall focus on James's rejection of philosophical oppositions.  Finally, we shall turn to the neo-pragmatism of Rorty's Philosophy and the Mirror of Nature paying particular attention to both his critique of the representational view of the mind and his recommendation of social pragmatism.

Prerequisites: None

Teaching and learning methods: The course is lecture-based, supplemented by tutorials

Methods of assessment and examination: Overall assessment is based on written examination. Written course work (essay) - if required - is added to the evaluation

Core text:
A detailed list of prescribed readings will be distributed at the beginning of the course.

 
Topics in Applied Philosophy

Code

Semester

Contact hours / weekly

ECTS

PI310

1

2 (Tutorials not included)

5

Lecturer: Dr. R. Hull

Course Description:   This course is concerned with the application of the study of philosophy to issues of pressing public concern. It takes the experiences of disability and social deprivation as case studies and looks at how such experiences can best be theoretically articulated. Particular attention is given to rival theories of human freedom and their relevance to contemporary social and political debates. Attention is also focused on how different theories of justice and morality imply very different social responses to the issues of disability and deprivation. Subjects covered include Rawls’ theory of freedom, Nozick's libertarianism, the acts/omissions distinction and the doctrine of double effect. The course is designed to give students an analytical background that can be used to explore other contemporary social and political issues. 

Prerequisites:   None

Teaching and Learning Methods:   This course is lecture-based, supplemented by tutorials

Methods of Assessment and Examination:  Overall assessment is based on a written essay.   Written course work  - if required - is added to the evaluation. 

Core Text:
Barnes, C., Disabled people in Britain and discrimination, Hurst and co, 1991. [346.42013 BAR]Bynoe, I.,  Oliver, M.,  & Barnes, C.,  Equal Rights for Disabled People: the case for a new law, Institute for Public Policy Research, 1991. [346.013]
Glover, J., Causing death and saving lives, Penguin Books, 1977. [179.7 GLO]
Gray, T, Freedom, Macmillan, 1991. [323.44]
Kymlicka, W. Contemporary Political Philosophy, Clarendon Press, 1990. [320.50904]
Nozick, R., Anarchy, State, and Utopia, Blackwell, 1974. [320.101 NOZ]
Pogge, T.W, Realizing Rawls, Cornell University Press, 1989. [320.001 RAW.P]Rawls, J. A Theory of Justice, Oxford University Press, 1974. [340.11]

 
Topics in Practical Philosophy  

Code

Semester

Contact hours / weekly

ECTS

PI234

2

2 (Tutorials not included)

5

Lecturer:   Dr. N. Ward

Course Description:   This module will deal with key issues in practical philosophy, discussing the question of the role of philosophical reflection with respect to human practice. The module will cover some of the following topics: the role of the ‘good life’ in understanding ethics, the place of virtue with respect to moral ‘ought’, the role of pleasure and self-love with respect to ethics, as well as questions of justice, happiness and moral motivation.

Prerequisites;   None.

Teaching and Learning Methods:  This course is lecture-based, supplemented by tutorials.

Methods of Assessment and examination:  Overall assessment is based on written essay.   Written course work (essay) - if required - is added to the evalution.

Core Text:  Aristotle: trans. by R. Crisp 2014, Nicomachean Ethics,, Cambridge University Press

 
Contemporary East Asian Philosophy (Off-Line)

It has been decided that this course Contemporary East Asian Philosophy will run in the Academic Year 2019/2020.   You cannot register for it the on-line registration.    You need to inform Ann O'Higgins, Room 311, First Floor, Tower One, Concourse by coming in person to the said office or by emailing ann.ohiggins@nuigalway.ie as soon as you have decided on your courses.

Code

Semester

Contact hours / weekly

ECTS

PI3102

2

2 (Tutorials not included)

5

Lecturer:  Dr. G. Cipriani

Course description: This module introduces students to modern and current East Asian philosophies. The first part provides an overview of the transformations of Chinese philosophy from the beginning of the 20th century to contemporary China, focusing on the ways philosophical traditions came under the influence of Western philosophy and were affected by socio-political events. The second part considers the development of Japanese modern philosophy from the end of the 19th century to present times, spanning the Kyoto School, modern ethics and contemporary philosophy of culture. The module requires basic familiarity with pre-modern East Asian philosophies.

Prerequisites: None

Teaching and learning methods:  The course is lecture-based, supplemented by tutorials

Methods of assessment and evaluation: Overall assessment is based on continued assessment. Written course work (essay), if required, is added to the evaluation

Core text:

Cheng, C.-Y. and Bunnin, N. (eds.), Contemporary Chinese Philosophy, Wiley-Blackwell.
Tiwald, J. and Van Norden , B.W. (eds.), Readings in Later Chinese Philosophy: Han to the 20th Century, Hackett Publishing.
Calichman, R. (ed.), Contemporary Japanese Thought, Columbia University Press.
Yusa, M. (ed.), The Bloomsbury Research Handbook of Contemporary Japanese Philosophy, Bloomsbury.

 

History of Irish Thought

Code

Semester

Contact hours / weekly

ECTS

PI241

2

2 (Tutorials not included)

5

Lecturer: Dr. J. O'Reilly

Course description: This course (History of Irish Thought) covers the history of Irish thought from the seventh century to the twentieth century, focusing in some detail on the ideas of selected individual thinkers.   The course begins with the thought of the Irish Augustine, an Irish monk from the seventh century.    It continues with an examination of the work of the great ninth-century thinker, John Scottus Eriugena.    The bulk of the course will discuss the thought of the modern thinkers, including Robert Boyle, John Toland, George Berkeley, Jonathan Swift, Francis Hutcheson and Edmund Burke.

Prerequisites: None

Teaching and learning methods: The course is lecture-based, supplemented by tutorials.

Methods of assessment and evaluation: The course will be evaluated by essay.   

Core Texts:
Duddy, T:  A History of Irish Thought, Routledge, 2002.

 
Advanced Philosophical Text

Code

Semester

Contact hours / weekly

ECTS

PI129

2

2 (Tutorials not included)

5

Lecturer: Dr. N. Tosh

Course description: This module allows students to read a philosophical text in much greater detail than is allowed by an ordinary survey course.    The choice of text will allow teaching to follow specific research interests developed by the lecturer in charge of the course.   

For this Academic Year (2019/2020) PI129 is  a formal logic course.    The 'Advanced Philosphical Text' is Paul Teller's Modern Formal Logic Primer.    The course focuses on chapters 8 and 9 of Volume 1, and chapters 1-3 and 7-9 of Volume 2.   

Prerequisites

Teaching and learning methods: The course is lecture-based, supplemented by tutorials.

Methods of assessment and evaluation: The course will be evaluated by essay.

Core Texts:  A reading list will be handed out at the beginning of the semester.

Extended Essay

Code

Semester

Contact hours / weekly

ECTS

PI399

2

Tutorials by appointment

5

The extended essay is intended to allow you to demonstrate the full range of your understanding of some of the major themes of Philosophy that you have been studying for the past three years. While you should, therefore, not be afraid of being ambitious in terms of scope of the argument that you present, you should not forget that you are by now expected to maintain high standards in supporting and documenting the argument that you make. You should choose an essay title reflecting the main research interest you developed in Philosophy during the years of your study. You are required to discuss the choice of essay topic with a lecturer. You are also required to obtain supervision of your essay from a full-time member of staff.

Core Text:
A.C.Grayling 2007, Philosophy 1: a guide through the subject, Oxford University Press Oxford [ISBN: 978-019875243]
A.C.Grayling 1999, Philosophy 2: further guide through the subject, Oxford University Press USA [ISBN: 978-019875178]

Read our guidelines for writing the extended essay.