Course Overview

This course was designed to meet the needs of second level teachers who, either wish to teach or are currently teaching ‘Politics and Society’ on the Leaving Certificate curriculum. The course focuses on content which directly corresponds with the four strands of learning identified on the curriculum, thus providing students with the skills, knowledge, learning and teaching methodologies required to engage with the subject. It covers a diverse range of subject matter but specifically focuses on Power and Decision Making, Active Citzenship, Human Rights and Globalisation and Localisation.

The course will be delivered in a blended learning format combining face-to-face workshops with online study over two academic years.

Applications and Selections

Apply Online

Early application is advised as offers will be made on a rolling basis.
NB: You must also upload a copy of your final undergraduate degree result and a copy of your birth certificate or passport when applying online.

Further information and expressions of interest prior to application can be made to:

Lisa Walshe
Tel: 091 495787
Email: lisa.walshe@nuigalway.ie

Applicants wishing to undertake the course for the purposes of teaching must have completed a level 8 honours degree in order to meet Teaching Council requirements. Other applications must have completed a level 7 or higher qualification.

Who Teaches this Course

Requirements and Assessment

Assessment will consist a combination of written assignments and online exercises and activities.

Key Facts

Entry Requirements

Applicants wishing to undertake the course for the purposes of teaching must have completed a level 8 honours degree in order to meet Teaching Council requirements. Other applications must have completed a level 7 or higher qualification.

Entry requirements for part-time students can be found in our FAQs section (i.e. age, english language requirements etc.). 


Additional Requirements

Duration

2-years, part-time

Next start date

September

A Level Grades ()

Average intake

30

Closing Date

14-September 2018

NFQ level

8

Mode of study

Blended learning

ECTS weighting

60

Award

Higher Diploma in Arts (Politics and Society)

CAO

Course code

Course Outline

The course covers a diverse range of subject matter but specifically focuses on Power and Decision Making, Active Citzenship, Human Rights and Globalisation and Localisation.

Course Content – Year 1

  • Politics and Sociology: Origins, Concepts and Practice
  • Social Research Skills
  • The Sociology of Identity and Belonging
  • Teaching Methodologies for Politics and Society

Course Content – Year 2

  • Introduction to Human Rights Law: Rights and Responsibilities
  • Understanding Equality and Diversity
  • Social Inclusion, Civic Engagement and the Modern State
  • Development and Change

 

Curriculum Information

Curriculum information relates to the current academic year (in most cases).
Course and module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Glossary of Terms

Credits
You must earn a defined number of credits (aka ECTS) to complete each year of your course. You do this by taking all of its required modules as well as the correct number of optional modules to obtain that year's total number of credits.
Module
An examinable portion of a subject or course, for which you attend lectures and/or tutorials and carry out assignments. E.g. Algebra and Calculus could be modules within the subject Mathematics. Each module has a unique module code eg. MA140.
Optional
A module you may choose to study.
Required
A module that you must study if you choose this course (or subject).
Semester
Most courses have 2 semesters (aka terms) per year.

Year 1 (60 Credits)

Optional SP2201: Understanding Equality and Diversity


Semester 1 and Semester 2 | Credits: 5

This module explores the concepts of equality and diversity with a particular focus on the changing nature of Irish Society. It seeks to promote a full understanding of Equality and Diversity issues and opportunities and their relevance and application to our daily lives (within individual, family, community and work–based settings). It examines Equality and Diversity policies, procedures and legislation within Europe and Ireland .
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Define the concept of equality and the concept of diversity
  2. Define attitudes and discuss how attitudes influence our behaviour towards others.
  3. Identify and discuss Irish legislation relating to equality
  4. Explore barriers to participation in employment in the context of the four equality domains – redistribution, recognition, representation and respect.
  5. Explain the involvement and impact of European Directives on the development of Irish legislation designed to promote equality in the labour market.
Assessments
  • Department-based Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Against Equality of Opportunity." by Cavanagh, M.
    Publisher: Oxford University Press.
  2. "A Strategic Policy Framework for Equality Issues" by National Economic and Social Forum
    Publisher: National Economic and Social Forum.
The above information outlines module SP2201: "Understanding Equality and Diversity" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional SP1114: Politics and Sociology: Origins, Concepts and Practice


Semester 1 and Semester 2 | Credits: 10

This module introduces students to the sociological perspective and examines the main theoretical paradigms of sociology. It provides students with an understanding of the factors which led to the emergence of Sociology as an academic discipline and the main classical and contemporary theorists involved. It also provides a context for the emergence of modern day politics and focuses specifically on the contribution of classical political thinkers, such as Thomas Hobbes, John Locke and Jean Jacques Rousseau. It also introduces key concepts in political science, namely democracy and political ideologies. The module demonstrates the factors which connect the birth of sociology and modern day western politics and provides understanding of the purpose and function of sociology and politics in contemporary western society.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Discuss what is meant by politics and sociology as academic disciplines and why both are interlinked.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of the contribution of the classical and contemporary theorists of Sociology.
  3. Critique the main themes in Sociology.
  4. Analyse the ideas of Hobbes, Locke and Rousseau.
  5. Describe political ideologies ranging from Liberalism to Conservatism
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Introductory Sociology" by Tony Bilton,Kevin Bonnett,Pip Jones
    ISBN: 0333945719.
    Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
  2. "Sociology" by Anthony Giddens
    ISBN: 0745643582.
    Publisher: Polity
  3. "Sociology" by John J. Macionis,Kenneth Plummer
    ISBN: 0273727915.
    Publisher: Financial Times/Prentice Hall
  4. "Political Ideologies" by Andrew Heywood
    ISBN: 0230367259.
    Publisher: Palgrave MacMillan
  5. "Political Theory, Third Edition" by Andrew Heywood
    ISBN: 0333961803.
    Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
  6. "History of Western Philosophy" by Bertrand Russell
    ISBN: 0671201581.
    Publisher: Touchstone
The above information outlines module SP1114: "Politics and Sociology: Origins, Concepts and Practice" and is valid from 2018 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional SP1115: The Sociology of Identity and Belonging


Semester 1 and Semester 2 | Credits: 10

The purpose of this module is to introduce students to theories and key debates relating to identity and belonging. In the module, students will focus on different forms of identity constructs, which are central to contemporary society, including culture, nationality, gender, language and social class. Students will also study discrimination, stereotyping and prejudice as a form of identity abuse. The module examines key debates around migrant identities in particular, and evaluates the impact of migration on individual’s life trajectories, identities and understanding of ‘home’ both ‘real’ and ‘imagined’. The module requires students to reflect on and analyze the concept of identity and the process by which identity is formed, constructed, adapted and communicated. Students will be required to reflect on their own identity and explore how specific theoretical ideas can assist in understanding their own experiences.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Discuss the key theoretical perspectives and debates relating to identity and belonging.
  2. Reflect on their own personal identity - and that of others - using relevant theoretical ideas.
  3. Critique how identity is formed, adapted, constructed, imagined and communicated within society and the extent to which external forces assist this.
  4. Identify specific examples of how discrimination and other forms of 'identity abuse' emerge and develop.
  5. Evaluate the impact of migration on individual’s life trajectories, identities and understanding of ‘home’.
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Imagined Communities" by Benedict Anderson
    ISBN: 1844670864.
    Publisher: Verso
  2. "Conversations with Zygmunt Bauman" by Zygmunt Bauman,Keith Tester
    ISBN: 0745626653.
    Publisher: Blackwell Publishing
  3. "Identity" by Paul du Gay,Jessica Evans,Peter Redman,Open University
    ISBN: 0761969160.
    Publisher: SAGE
  4. "Modernity and Self-identity" by Anthony Giddens
    ISBN: 0804719446.
    Publisher: Stanford University Press
  5. "Identity" by Steph Lawler
    ISBN: 0745635768.
    Publisher: Polity
  6. "Belonging" by Maria Montserrat Guibernau i Berdún,Montserrat Guibernau
    ISBN: 9780745655062.
    Publisher: Polity
The above information outlines module SP1115: "The Sociology of Identity and Belonging" and is valid from 2018 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional SP1116: Teaching Methodologies for Politics and Society


Semester 1 and Semester 2 | Credits: 5

This module aims to provide students with the ability to examine and critically engage with the Leaving Certificate subject ‘Politics and Society’. It will provide students with clear knowledge and understanding of the subject specification, the strands of study and the topics of learning and discussion. It will give students the skills to identify and employ a range of materials, resources and teaching methodologies, which will allow them to effectively teach and engage with the subject. The module aims to provide students both with the skills and the confidence to provide a collaborative, participative learning environment for those studying the subject in a second level context.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Teach the core strands and specification of the subject of Politics and Society
  2. Critically engage with the subject matter of Politics and Society
  3. Effectively utilize a range of diverse teaching learning and assessment methodologies appropriate to the subject.
  4. Critially understand and reflect on the learning and on the effectiveness of pedagogical and assessment support materials.
  5. Apply the skills required to provide an inclusive, active and participative environment for students studying the subject in a second level classroom.
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Philosophy for Children" by Babs Anderson
    ISBN: 1138191752.
    Publisher: Routledge
  2. "Pedagogy of the Oppressed" by Paulo Freire
    ISBN: 0826412769.
    Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
  3. "Teaching Politics in Secondary Education" by Wayne Journell
    ISBN: 9781438467702.
  4. "The Political Classroom" by Diana E. Hess,Paula McAvoy
    ISBN: 0415880998.
    Publisher: Routledge
  5. "Embedded Formative Assessment" by Dylan Wiliam
    ISBN: 9781934009307.
    Publisher: Solution Tree
The above information outlines module SP1116: "Teaching Methodologies for Politics and Society" and is valid from 2018 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional SP2114: Introduction to Human Rights: Rights and Responsibilities


Semester 1 and Semester 2 | Credits: 10

This module examines the philosophical origins of human rights as well as the significance and position of human rights internationally, regionally and in terms of domestic law and policy. The foundations of modern day human rights will be examined, particularly the United Nations in 1945 and the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948. The role and function of intergovernmental and non-governmental organisations will be explored in terms of how they promote, implement and protect human rights as well as the relationship between regional and international systems and Irish law. This module will consider the possibility of whether or not human rights ideals should be universal or whether or not interpretations of human rights norms should be considered acceptable, depending on cultural values and practices.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand the origins of human rights and the historic circumstances which led to the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.
  2. Understand the international human rights system and the ways in which international law protects human rights.
  3. Critically analyse human rights practices and policies at international and national levels
  4. Assess the importance of and application of international human rights law to contemporary issues.
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Universal Human Rights in Theory and Practice" by Jack Donnelly
    ISBN: 0801477700.
    Publisher: Cornell University Press
  2. "Human Rights" by Andrew Clapham
    ISBN: 0198706162.
    Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  3. "International Law" by Vaughan Lowe
    ISBN: 0199239339.
    Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  4. "The United Nations" by Jussi M. Hanhimäki
    ISBN: 0190222700.
    Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  5. "Universal Declaration of Human Rights" by United Nations
    ISBN: 1523393726.
    Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
  6. "Human Rights" by Darren J. O'Byrne
    ISBN: 0582438241.
    Publisher: Pearson Education
The above information outlines module SP2114: "Introduction to Human Rights: Rights and Responsibilities" and is valid from 2018 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional SP1113: Social Research Skills


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

This module comprises of an introductory under-graduate course on the theory and practice of social research. Research is essentially about collecting information in a methodical way in order to answer a question or test out a theory. The module focuses on how social research can play a vital role in community, youth and family work.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. A familiarity with some of the fundamental concepts and approaches to social research.
  2. An appreciation of the link between theory and practice in social research
  3. An understanding of how social research can be effectively applied to work with communities and families.
  4. A competence in evaluating and choosing specific research methods in an applied context
  5. An appreciation of ethical concerns within social research and a familiarity with strategies to manage ethical considerations
Assessments
  • Department-based Assessment (100%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module SP1113: " Social Research Skills " and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional SP188: Development and Change


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

Assessments
  • Department-based Assessment (100%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module SP188: "Development and Change" and is valid from 2014 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional SP2100: Social Inclusion, Civic Engagment and the Modern State (10 ECTS)


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

This module explores the meaning of ‘social inclusion’ and ‘civic engagement’ in conceptual terms, in order to clarify and distinguish between both concepts theoretically, before debating the wider implications for the application of these concepts within current research, policies and practices in modern society. Questions will be raised as to how ‘citizenship’ and ‘civic engagement’ can be usefully applied to our thinking about social inclusion in society, in addition to exploring the developing connection between social inclusion policies and civic engagement at a national and European level.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Define the concepts of social inclusion and civic engagement in the context of the contemporary society.
  2. Critique the barriers to social inclusion from an individual and societal perspective
  3. Assess approaches to promote civic engagement and citizenship across regional, national and international boundaries.
  4. Advocate models of good practice among learners which encourage socially inclusive initiatives across societal structures
  5. Explore barriers to participation and active citizenship through policy review and analysis.
  6. Identify and discuss key influences on what a modern state consists of – including culture, values, ideology, economics and politics.
  7. 7 Examine a case study of civic engagement policies and practices from an Irish perspective.
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Models of Democracy" by David Held
    ISBN: 0804754721.
    Publisher: Stanford University Press
  2. "Community at Loose Ends" by Miami Theory Collective (Oxford, Ohio)
    ISBN: 0816619212.
    Publisher: U of Minnesota Press
  3. "Attention Deficit Democracy" by Ben Berger
    ISBN: 9780691144689.
    Publisher: Princeton University Press
The above information outlines module SP2100: "Social Inclusion, Civic Engagment and the Modern State (10 ECTS)" and is valid from 2018 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Further Education

Students can proceed to level 9 through the Masters in Political Science and Sociology

Why Choose This Course?

Career Opportunities

This course provides career opportunities for Secondary school teachers who wish to upskill in order to teach Politics and Society on the Leaving Certificate curriculum and for those who wish to pursue further studies in this area for professional development reasons.

Who’s Suited to This Course

Learning Outcomes

 

Work Placement

Study Abroad

Related Student Organisations

Course Fees

Fees: EU

€2,035 p.a.

Fees: Tuition

Fees: Student levy

Fees: Non EU

€2,535 p.a.


A fees scholarship of up to 30% may be available for students who wish to upskill for the purposes of re-employment. Students must be registered as unemployed and in receipt of one of the following:

  • Job-seekers Benefit
  • Job-seekers Allowance
  • One-parent family allowance
  • Disability allowance
  • Community Employment Scheme
  • Carer’s Allowance
  • Signing for social insurance contribution credits

Please download the 2018_19 Fees Scholarship Form for more information.

Find out More

Lisa Walshe 
Centre for Adult Learning & Professional Development 
NUI Galway 
Tel: 091 495787
Email: lisa.walshe@nuigalway.ie