Course Overview

Scholarships are available for this programme.

This is a one-year full-time Master’s programme, with the option to be delivered as a two-year part-time programme if required.

It introduces students to concepts, debates, tools and practices related to the application of digital technologies to both the creative arts and humanities research. It therefore offers students scope for both reflective analysis and advanced digital skills acquisition.

The programme is interdisciplinary and will allow students to follow ‘research-focused’ or ‘practice-focused’ streams, provided through a menu of core and optional modules. The programme offers a combination of themes and skills unique among Irish third-level institutions. For some graduates the programme will provide a stepping stone to a PhD project; for others it will provide a foundational skill-set for employment in the fields of ICT, cultural heritage, and the creative arts.

Applications and Selections

Applications are made online via the NUI Galway Postgraduate Applications System

Who Teaches this Course

CORE STAFF

  • Professor Sean Ryder, School of Humanities
  • Dr Justin Tonra, School of Humanities
  • Mr David Kelly, Digital Humanities
  • Dr Anne Karhio, School of Humanities

Additional staff are drawn from School of Engineering and Informatics, James Hardiman Library archives unit, Huston School of Film and Digital Media, School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures, and School of Geography and Archaeology.

Requirements and Assessment

Key Facts

Entry Requirements

Applicants will require a NQAI Level 8 degree, Second Class Honours, or equivalent, with a 2.1 in a related subject. Where applicants do not meet the formal academic requirements they can apply for entry through the university’s Recognition for Prior Learning Policy.

Additional Requirements

Duration

1 year, full-time
2 years, part-time

Next start date

September 2019

A Level Grades ()

Average intake

16

Closing Date

NFQ level

Mode of study

ECTS weighting

Award

CAO

Course code

1MAD1 (full-time)
1MAD2 (part-time)

Course Outline

CORE MODULES

Introduction to Digital Humanities
This course will explore a range of topics from the intersection of computing and the humanities, with a particular emphasis on literary studies. Topic and questions to be addressed include: the history of computing in the humanities, and how computers can augment traditional analytic methods in the humanities. Classes will be divided between in-depth discussions of assigned readings and more hands-on exploration and use of pertinent digital tools and platforms.

 Digital Literature, Arts and Creative Practice

The course will explore the ways in which new technologies have been used in the creation of “born-digital” works of literature and other arts, and the impacts of these developments on ideas of creativity, publishing and creative practice.

Digital Tools

The course will be conducted as a series of workshops that will introduce students to basic skills in digital tools including database construction, programming and coding, data visualisation and digitisation.

Culture Society Technology

A postgraduate introduction to issues and problems in the relationships among culture, society and technology. The course will examine the impact of technologies, especially digital technologies, from cultural, political, ethical, legal and other points of view.

Digital Cultures Workshop & Final Project 

Independent research project in digital arts and humanities. Students will design, plan and complete a practically-based digital project or a dissertation in a relevant area, under direction of a member of programme staff. Workshops supporting the research project will be held during Semester Two.

 OPTIONS (two to be chosen; menu of options may vary from year to year)

a) Digital Analytics and Visualisation for Arts & Humanities
A specially-tailored introduction to the analysis and visualisation of data for arts and humanities research. Students will be introduced to basic visualisation applications and tools, and to the wider issues of the design and purpose of data visualisation.

b) Text Technologies

This course provides historical, theoretical, and practical training in text technologies for the postgraduate student in the humanities. The course is comprised of two major parts: first, students will learn about the history of texts and text technologies from the creation of writing to the present day, and study a variety of theoretical perspectives on textuality and the interpretation of text. This forms the basis for the second part of the course, where students will learn a range of practical computational corpus linguistics and text analysis procedures for the preparation, manipulation, analysis, and exploration of digital texts. Students will write basic programmes to count the number or words in a text file, and move from there to more complex analytical investigations of text. This course will be of interest to humanities students who work with texts of all kinds, and will empower those who wish to use computational techniques for working with texts.

c) Digital Editions and Digital Archives

This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of digital archiving and digital scholarly editing. Students will gain hands-on experience creating digital editions and archives, and understand the theoretical and practical issues involved in the creation and use of these digital forms. The course will be co-taught with staff from the James Hardiman Library.

d) The Abbey Theatre Digital Archive

This course involves using content from  NUI Galway’s Abbey Theatre Digital Archive as the basis for an independent project using digital archiving / digital editing / visualisation / data-mining skills, under the guidance of a staff member.

 e) E-Literature

This course is an exploration of the theory and practice of electronic (born-digital) literature. The course will examine its major genres, the challenges it poses to traditional literary theory, and the complex issues at stake in this emerging field of creativity.

e) Introduction to GIS

This course covers the basic concepts and applications of a geographic information system (GIS). The topics of GIS data concepts, modelling, attribute management, input and analysis are explained. GIS software ArcGIS is selected as the main training software package for computer practicals in this course. Students will get general knowledge of GIS and acquire the basic techniques of GIS software to independently produce professional maps and carry out spatial queries and basic GIS analyses.

f) Digital Play and Practice

This module introduces students to creative problem solving, creative process and designing strategy for digital media experiences. In the module students will explore techniques for short-form content creation and basic practical skills for the production of a piece of film / content for the Internet. The module will also introduce emerging technologies in digital arts such as Virtual Reality (Film/Animation/Gaming/Experiences), Augmented Reality, Holography, 3D Projection.

g) Digital Film and Culture

This course provides a critical understanding of the relationship between film and digital technology, assessing the impact of digital filmmaking on film production and film theory. Through task-based learning, students will be asked to consider the impact of digital media on our relationship to visual culture. The course will consider what the place of film (and cinema) is in the digital age and the impact which digital technology has on our relationship to visual media.

h) Data Journalism

In this module students will learn a range of techniques for sourcing, analysing, and representing data-based stories through practice-driven learning.

Curriculum Information

Curriculum information relates to the current academic year (in most cases).
Course and module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Glossary of Terms

Credits
You must earn a defined number of credits (aka ECTS) to complete each year of your course. You do this by taking all of its required modules as well as the correct number of optional modules to obtain that year's total number of credits.
Module
An examinable portion of a subject or course, for which you attend lectures and/or tutorials and carry out assignments. E.g. Algebra and Calculus could be modules within the subject Mathematics. Each module has a unique module code eg. MA140.
Optional
A module you may choose to study.
Required
A module that you must study if you choose this course (or subject).
Semester
Most courses have 2 semesters (aka terms) per year.

Year 1 (90 Credits)

Required EN6122: Digital Cultures Workshop and Final Project


15 months long | Credits: 30

Independent research project in digital arts and humanities. Students will design, plan and complete a practically-based digital project or a dissertation in a relevant area, under direction of a member of programme staff. Workshops supporting the research project will be held during Semester Two.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Identify a discrete topic or research problem in digital arts and humanities requiring investigation.
  2. Design and plan an independent research project within the context of an existing body of scholarship and digital arts and humanities practice
  3. Identify an appropriate methodology or methodologies for addressing the chosen research problem.
  4. Apply appropriate digital tools to a problem or problems in the field of digital arts and humanities
  5. Complete a research dissertation of MA standard and/or an equivalent practice-based digital project.
Assessments
  • Research (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "MLA Handbook" by Association of America, Modern Language.
    ISBN: 1603292624.
    Publisher: New York; The Modern Language Association of America
  2. "Doing Digital Humanities: Practice, Training, Research" by Constance Crompton
    ISBN: 1138899445.
    Publisher: Routledge
The above information outlines module EN6122: "Digital Cultures Workshop and Final Project" and is valid from 2018 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required EN6123: Digital Tools


Semester 1 | Credits: 10

Postgraduate introduction to digital tools and methods appropriate to arts and humanities. The course will be conducted as a series of workshops that will introduce students to basic skills in digital tools including database construction, programming and coding, data visualisation and digitisation.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Describe the purpose of various key technologies used in digital arts and humanities.
  2. Evaluate the most appropriate tools for particular tasks in digital arts and humanities.
  3. Employ key tools used in digital arts and humanities projects, including databases, TEI encoding, programming, and data visualisation.
  4. Demonstrate basic skills with key digital tools.
  5. Demonstrate teamwork skills.
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module EN6123: "Digital Tools" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required EN6118: Digital Literature, Arts, and Creative Practice


Semester 1 | Credits: 10

Postgraduate introduction to digital creative practice in literature and other arts. The course will explore the ways in which new technologies have been used in the creation of born-digital works of literature and other arts, and the wider cultural impact of these developments.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Describe how new media technologies have been used in the processes of literary and other creative practices.
  2. Articulate a comprehensive picture of the expanding field of born-digital creative work
  3. Analyse and critique a range of aesthetic practices associated with digital arts and literature.
  4. Describe the theoretical and methodological implications of digital creative practice.
  5. Employ a selection of digital tools and platforms as a form of creative and critical inquiry.
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Cybertext" by Espen J. Aarseth
    ISBN: 0801855799.
    Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press
  2. "Writing space" by Jay David Bolter
    ISBN: 0805829199.
    Publisher: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates
  3. "Prehistoric digital poetry" by C. T. Funkhouser
    ISBN: 0817354220.
    Publisher: University of Alabama Press
  4. "Digital Art and Meaning: Reading Kinetic Poetry, Text Machines, Mapping Art, and Interactive Installations" by Roberto Simanowski
    ISBN: 0816667381.
    Publisher: Univ Of Minnesota Press
The above information outlines module EN6118: "Digital Literature, Arts, and Creative Practice" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required EN6105: Introduction to Digital Humanities


Semester 1 | Credits: 10

This class will explore a range of topics from the intersection of computing and the humanities, with a particular emphasis on literary studies. Topic and questions to be addressed include: the history of computing in the humanities, and how computers can augment traditional analytic methods in the humanities. Classes will be divided between in-depth discussions of assigned readings and more practical and hands-on exploration and use of pertinent digital tools and platforms.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Describe how computers have been used to study literature and other humanities topics in the past and present.
  2. Articulate a comprehensive picture of the emerging discipline of digital humanities and address its role within the academy and beyond.
  3. Demonstrate how computers can aid and supplement many existing theories and methodologies in the humanities and literary studies.
  4. Use, analyse, and critique a range of digital technologies developed for digital humanities tasks.
  5. Effectively synthesise the new theories and methodologies of digital humanities with existing disciplinary training in the humanities.
  6. Recognise the fundamental interdisciplinarity of digital humanities, and appreciate the value of such an approach to humanities study.
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "A Companion to Digital Humanities" by Schreibman, Susan, Ray Siemens, and John Unsworth, eds.
  2. "A Companion to Digital Literary Studies" by Siemens, Ray, and Susan Schreibman, eds
  3. "Debates in the Digital Humanities" by Gold, Matthew K, ed
  4. "Defining Digital Humanities: A Reader" by Terras, Melissa M., Julianne Nyhan, and Edward Vanhoutte, eds
  5. "Graphs, Maps, Trees" by Moretti, Franco
The above information outlines module EN6105: "Introduction to Digital Humanities" and is valid from 2015 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required EN6119: Culture Society Technology


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

Postgraduate introduction to issues and problems in the relationships among culture, society and technology. The course will examine the impact of technologies, especially digital technologies, from cultural, political, ethical, legal and other points of view.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Describe key aspects of the historical impact of technology on culture, creativity and society, with particular focus on the digital age.
  2. Analyse and critique a range of theoretical debates associated with the interrelations of culture, society and technology.
  3. Evaluate the effect of technologies (especially digital technologies) on aspects of contemporary life.
  4. Describe key legal and ethical issues that arise in the use of new technologies.
  5. Compare ways in which the relations between culture and technology have been described and understood by a selection of writers and theorists of the present and past.
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Digital play" by Stephen Kline, Nick Dyer-Witheford and Greig de Peuter
    ISBN: 0773525912.
    Publisher: Montr?eal ; McGill-Queen's University Press, 2003.
  2. "Wired shut" by Tarleton Gillespie
    ISBN: 0262072823.
    Publisher: MIT Press
  3. "Personal connections in the digital age" by Nancy Baym
    ISBN: 0745643329.
    Publisher: Polity
The above information outlines module EN6119: "Culture Society Technology" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional EN6121: Digital Editions and Digital Archives


12 months long | Credits: 10

Postgraduate introduction to the theory and practice of digital scholarly editing and digital archiving. Students will gain hands-on experience creating digital editors and archives, and understand the theoretical and practical issues involved in the creation and use of these digital forms. The course will be co-taught with staff from the James Hardiman Library digitisation and archives units.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Describe and critique various examples of digital scholarly editions.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of fundamental debates in scholarly editing, and their implications for digital editions.
  3. Describe and evaluate the nature and scope of digital archives.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge of key principles and methods associated with the creation and curation of digital editions and archives.
  5. Create a digital edition or digital archive.
Assessments
  • Department-based Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "A New Companion to Digital Humanities" by Susan Schreibman
    ISBN: 1118680642.
    Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
  2. "Digital Scholarly Editing: Theories, Models and Methods" by Elena Pierazzo
    ISBN: 1472412117.
    Publisher: Routledge
  3. "Digital Critical Editions" by Daniel Apollon
    ISBN: 0252082567.
    Publisher: University of Illinois Press
The above information outlines module EN6121: "Digital Editions and Digital Archives" and is valid from 2018 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional FM6102: Digital Play & Practice


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

This module aims to explore the landscape of current innovations in digital media technologies across a range of arts disciplines. The module will explore emerging technologies in digital arts such as Virtual Reality (Film/ Animation/Gaming/Experiences), Augmented Reality, Holography, 3D Projection Mapping. Students will follow a design thinking approach to develop digital media prototypes.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Comprehend and describe key issues and debates surrounding the development and evolution of new media technologies.
  2. Demonstrate competence in the creation and production of a piece of digital media project.
  3. Demonstrate competence in problem solving, creative and strategic thinking.
  4. Consider and evaluate their own work in a reflexive manner, with reference to academic and/or professional issues and debates.
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "You Can Find Inspiration In Everything*: *And If You Can't, Look Again" by Paul Smith
    Publisher: Thames & Hudson Ltd
  2. "The Johns Hopkins Guide to Digital Media" by Marie-Laure Ryan, Lori Emerson, and Benjamin J. Robertson
    Publisher: John Hopkins University Press
  3. "Change by Design: How Design Thinking Transforms Organizations and Inspires Innovation" by Tim Brown
    Publisher: HarperCollins
  4. "The Art of Innovation: Lessons in Creativity from IDEO, America's Leading Design Firm" by Tom Kelley, Jonathan Littman
    Publisher: Broadway Business
  5. "Digital Filmmaking" by Mike Figgis
    Publisher: Faber and Faber
The above information outlines module FM6102: "Digital Play & Practice" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional FM6105: Digital Film and Culture


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

This course provides a critical understanding of the relationship between film and digital technology, assessing the impact of digital filmmaking on film production and film theory. Through task-based learning, students will be asked to consider the impact of digital media on our relationship to visual culture. The course will consider what the place of film (and cinema) is in the digital age and the impact which digital technology has on our relationship to visual media.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate a specific and comparative knowledge of various theoretical approaches to film and digital visual culture.
  2. Demonstrate an enhanced awareness of film aesthetics and film cultures within the context of digital technology.
  3. Engage critically with film-makers and theorists in debates about the nature of film and film studies in light of developments within digital technology.
  4. Produce and critically reflect upon short audio-visual projects.
  5. Work in flexible, creative and independent ways, showing self-direction, self-discipline and reflexivity.
  6. Demonstrate skills in written, oral and visual communications.
Assessments
  • Department-based Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "The Language of New Media" by Lev Manovich
    Publisher: MIT Press
  2. "Film Theory and Criticism" by Leo Baudry and & Marshall Cohen’s (eds.)
    Publisher: Oxford University Press
  3. "Puzzle Films: Complex Storytelling in Contemporary Cinema" by Warren Buckland
    Publisher: Blackwell
  4. "The Cinema Effect" by Sean Cubitt
    Publisher: MIT Press
  5. ", Remediation: Understanding New Media" by Jay Bolter and Richard Grusin
    Publisher: MIT Press
  6. "Convergence Culture: Where Old and New Media Collide" by Henry Jenkins
    Publisher: NYU Press
The above information outlines module FM6105: "Digital Film and Culture" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional EN6124: E-Literature


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

Postgraduate introduction to the theory and practice of electronic (born-digital) literature. The course will examine its major genres, the challenges it poses to traditional literary theory, and the complex issues at stake in this emerging field of creativity.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Describe the history and development of electronic (born-digital) literature.
  2. Evaluate selected case studies in electronic literary practice.
  3. Demonstrate the implications of born-digital literature for theories of literature and creativity.
  4. Show familiarity with the variety of methods and practices employed by digital literary practitioners.
  5. Employ a selection of tools and platforms to create a creative electronic text.
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Electronic Literature: New Horizons for the Literary" by N. Katherine Hayles
    ISBN: 0268030855.
    Publisher: University of Notre Dame Press
  2. "Cybertext: Perspectives on Ergodic Literature" by Espen J. Aarseth
    ISBN: 0801855799.
    Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press
The above information outlines module EN6124: "E-Literature" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional EN6120: Digital Analytics and Visualisation for Arts and Humanities


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

Postgraduate introduction to the analysis and visualisation of data for arts and humanities research. Students will be introduced to basic visualisation applications and tools, and to the wider issues of the design and purpose of data visualisation.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Describe the tools and techniques used to organize data for analysis and visualisation.
  2. Articulate the concepts and approaches used to create effective visualisations.
  3. Describe appropriate technologies and tools used to produce interactive data visualisations.
  4. Demonstrate the value and use of visualisation tools through practical examples.
  5. Design and create data visualisations appropriate to specific data sets.
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "The visual display of quantitative information" by Edward R. Tufte
    ISBN: 0961392142.
    Publisher: Graphics Press
  2. "The Functional Art: An introduction to information graphics and visualization" by Alberto Cairo
    ISBN: 0321834739.
    Publisher: New Riders
The above information outlines module EN6120: "Digital Analytics and Visualisation for Arts and Humanities" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional TI2102: Introduction To GIS


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

This course covers the basic concepts and applications of a geographic information system (GIS). The topics of GIS data concepts, modelling, attribute management, input and analysis are explained. GIS software ArcGIS is selected as the main training software package for computer practicals in this course. Students will get general knowledge of GIS and acquire the basic techniques of GIS software to independently produce professional maps and carry out spatial queries and basic GIS analyses.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. • Understand basic concepts in GIS
  2. • Solve basic GIS application problems
  3. • Acquire computer skills in GIS, including data collection, editing, database management, basic analysis, and map design
  4. • Produce professional GIS maps
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Introduction to Geographical Information Systems" by Ian Heywood, Sarah Cornelius, and Steve Carver
    ISBN: 027372259X.
    Publisher: Prentice Hall
  2. "Getting to Know ArcGIS for Desktop" by Michael Law and Amy Collins
    ISBN: 1589483081.
    Publisher: Environmental Systems Research Institute
  3. "Geographic information systems" by Tor Bernhardsen
    ISBN: 0471419680.
    Publisher: Wiley
  4. "Geographical information systems: an introduction" by Julie Delaney & Kimberly Van Niel
    ISBN: 0195556070.
    Publisher: Oxford University Press
  5. "Getting Started with Geographic Information Systems" by Keith C. Clarke
    ISBN: 0131494988.
    Publisher: Prentice Hall
  6. "Geographic Information Systems and Science" by Paul A. Longley, Michael F. Goodchild, David J. Maguire, and David W. Rhind
    Publisher: Wiley
The above information outlines module TI2102: "Introduction To GIS" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional DJ6104: Data Journalism


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

In this module students will learn a range of techniques for sourcing, analysing, and representing data-based stories,through practice-driven learning,
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Develop stories that rely on leveraging the internet as a research tool and production space.
  2. Select and use appropriate analytical tools for a particular task to analyse database stories.
  3. Generate narrative storylines from patterns identified in large data sets.
  4. Analyse data using appropriate statistical techniques.
  5. Use appropriate visualisation tools to communicate complex data-based narratives to audiences effectively.
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "The Digital Reporter's Notebook" by Blaine, Mark
    ISBN: 9780415898614.
    Publisher: Routledge
  2. "Practicing Convergence Journalism" by Janet Kolodzy
    ISBN: 9780415890304.
    Publisher: Routledge
  3. "The Investigative Reporter's Handbook" by Brant Houston
    ISBN: 0312589972.
    Publisher: Bedford/St Martins
  4. "Principles of Convergent Journalism" by Jeffrey S. Wilkinson, August E. Grant, Douglas J. Fisher
    ISBN: 9780199838653.
    Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  5. "The Online Journalism Handbook" by Bradshaw, Paul and Liisa Rohumaa
    ISBN: 9781405873406.
  6. "The Multimedia Journalist" by Jennifer George-Palilonis
    ISBN: 9780199764525.
    Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  7. "Online Journalism" by James C. Foust
    ISBN: 9781934432174.
    Publisher: Holcomb Hathaway, Publishers
  8. "Producing Online News" by Ryan Thornburg
    ISBN: 9781604269963.
    Publisher: CQ Press College
The above information outlines module DJ6104: "Data Journalism" and is valid from 2018 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Further Education

Depending on subjects studied at undergraduate level, graduates of the MA in Digital Cultures will be eligible to apply for PhD in a variety of arts and humanities disciplines, and will also have opportunities for doctoral studies in areas of ICT and practice-based research.

Why Choose This Course?

Career Opportunities

Graduates will be able to follow employment opportunities where a combination of high level of information technology skills may be required in conjunction with core humanities skills in communication, analysis, research and creativity. This includes areas such as information and communication technologies; creative arts; cultural heritage; media; teaching and further research.

Who’s Suited to This Course

Learning Outcomes

 

Work Placement

Study Abroad

Related Student Organisations

Course Fees

Fees: EU

€6,200 p.a. 2018/19

Fees: Tuition

€5,976 p.a. 2018/19

Fees: Student levy

€224 p.a. 2018/19

Fees: Non EU

€14,250 p.a. 2018/19

Find out More

Professor Sean Ryder
School of Humanities
NUI Galway
T: +353 91 493 009
E: sean.ryder@nuigalway.ie