Course Overview

The Master of Education in Design, Learning and Technology (DLT) is being introduced at a crucial time for educational technology in Ireland with the growth of coding and computational thinking (CT); the increased mobility and portability of technological devices; virtualisation and cloud infrastructures; and curricular developments in computer science and technology. Concurrent with the development of their foundational understanding of how information communication technologies can be used to mobilise and augment learning, the programme will develop educators’ skills in the design, deployment and evaluation of coding and mobile learning within diverse educational contexts both formal and informal.

Applications and Selections

Applications are made online via the NUI Galway Postgraduate Applications System

Who Teaches this Course

Requirements and Assessment

Key Facts

Entry Requirements

Degree or postgraduate qualification in education or cognate subjects.

Additional Requirements

Duration

2 years, part-time

Next start date

September 2019

A Level Grades ()

Average intake

10

Closing Date

NFQ level

Mode of study

ECTS weighting

Award

CAO

Course code

MED3

Course Outline

The MEd (DLT) is open to all teachers and educators interested in technology-enhanced learning, irrespective of subject domain or educational sector. The course has been developed in response to current seminal, educational policy initiatives, including the Digital Strategy for Schools 2015–2020, STEM Education in the Irish School System (2016), and new curricular developments, for example in computer science.

Curriculum Information

Curriculum information relates to the current academic year (in most cases).
Course and module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Glossary of Terms

Credits
You must earn a defined number of credits (aka ECTS) to complete each year of your course. You do this by taking all of its required modules as well as the correct number of optional modules to obtain that year's total number of credits.
Module
An examinable portion of a subject or course, for which you attend lectures and/or tutorials and carry out assignments. E.g. Algebra and Calculus could be modules within the subject Mathematics. Each module has a unique module code eg. MA140.
Optional
A module you may choose to study.
Required
A module that you must study if you choose this course (or subject).
Semester
Most courses have 2 semesters (aka terms) per year.

Year 1 (90 Credits)

Required ED6171: Conversations in Critical Educational Thought I


Semester 1 | Credits: 10

This module invites participants to engage with a number of theoretical perspectives, concepts and empirical research in the Sociology and Psychology of Education to explore their application to education. Drawing on critical perspectives and findings from contemporary research, the module examines a number of themes, including educational disadvantage and privilege in relation to social class, ‘race’/ethnicity and gender, in Irish and international contexts; trajectories, risk factors and protective factors in adolescent development; processes of thinking and learning from the lens of psychological learning theories; inter-individual differences in learner attributes; and supporting positive mental health and well-being. This module consists of 10 two-hour sessions, delivered through a blended learning approach, with approximately half of the sessions conducted face-to-face, and half online.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate the ability to ‘think sociologically’ and apply such thinking to the analysis of educational processes;
  2. Critically examine individuals’ positionality/ies, and educational beliefs and trajectories(including their own) with regard to socio-demographic factors;
  3. Apply a social class, gender, and ‘race’/ethnicity analysis to education;
  4. Distinguish between instructional practices that are evidence-based and those that are based on pseudopsychological ‘myths’;
  5. Critically evaluate psychological theories pertaining to learner characteristics including intelligence and motivation;
  6. Appraise and synthesise the research findings on approaches for supporting mental health and well-being in adolescents;
  7. Demonstrate the ability to ‘think psychologically’, that is, to apply psychological theories, frameworks and findings to predict and explain phenomena in classrooms; and
  8. Use knowledge and understanding of psychological and sociological theories and evidence from research to critically examine, reflect on, and develop their professional practice.
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (60%)
  • Oral, Audio Visual or Practical Assessment (40%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Immigration and Schooling in the Republic of Ireland" by Devine, D.
    Publisher: Manchester University Press
    Chapters: Making a Difference?
  2. "The RoutledgeFalmer reader in sociology of education" by Ball, S.J.
    Publisher: Routledge/Falmer
  3. "Equality in Education" by Lynch, K.
    Publisher: Gill and Macmillan
  4. "Essentials of Educational Psychology: Big Ideas to Guide Effective Teaching" by Omrod, J.E.
    Publisher: Pearson
  5. "Miseducation: Inequality, education and the working classes" by Reay, D.
    Publisher: Policy Press
  6. "Questioning Gender: A Sociological Explanation" by Ryle, R.
    Publisher: Sage
The above information outlines module ED6171: "Conversations in Critical Educational Thought I" and is valid from 2019 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required ED6169: Theories of Technology-Enhanced Learning


Semester 1 | Credits: 10

The aim of this module is to develop students' conceptual understanding of technology-enhanced learning as a dynamic and emerging field of scientific enquiry for the systematic development of educational technologies and innovations. The focus of the course is self-directed learning, where students will engage broadly and deeply with relevant literature on concepts and critiques of educational technology. The curriculum of the course will be wide-ranging, including philosophical (principled) and empirical (participatory) discourses relating to the potential impact of technology on education and learning in schools and other learning settings, formal and informal.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Discuss critically key discourses in the field of technology-enhanced learning, and cognate areas/disciplines, including the learning sciences and computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL);
  2. Conceptualise systematically key debates, issues, challenges and the potential of technology-enhanced learning;
  3. Undertake successfully a systematic literature review on technology-enhanced learning;
  4. Describe the provenance, history and development of technology-enhanced learning as a field of scientific enquiry for the systematic development of educational technologies and innovations;
  5. Identify directions for future development of technology-enhanced learning, particularly with respect to their own specific teaching context and interests.
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "The Cambridge Handbook of the Learning Sciences" by Sawyer, R.K.
    Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  2. "Smart Machines in Education" by Forbus, K.D., & Feltovich, P.J.
    Publisher: AAA1 Press
  3. "Changing Minds" by Di Sessa, A.
    Publisher: The MIT Press
    Chapters: Computers, Learning, and Literacy.
  4. "Video Research in the Learning Sciences" by Golman, R., Pea, R,. Barron, B., & Derry, S.J.
    Publisher: Routledge
  5. "Conducting Educational Design Research" by Susan McKenney,Thomas C. Reeves
    ISBN: 9780415618045.
  6. "Education, Narrative Technologies and Digital Learning: Designing Storytelling for Creativity with Computing" by Tony Hall
    ISBN: 9781137320.
    Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
The above information outlines module ED6169: "Theories of Technology-Enhanced Learning" and is valid from 2019 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required ED6170: Coding and Computational Thinking


Semester 1 | Credits: 10

This module aims to develop students' competences and skills in applying co-operative and iterative, design-based research methods to the development, deployment and evaluation of coding and computational thinking in classrooms and other key sites of learning, formal and informal. The focus of the module is self-directed learning, where students will develop a detailed plan for how they will take a nascent computational thinking design for an educational technology or pedagogical innovation from initial co-operative evaluation with learners through to full implementation and, or a high-fidelity prototype. Students will use educational coding software, to develop their computational thinking design with pupils/learners.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Apply design-based research methods to the development of new computational thinking designs for classrooms and other casual and non-formal learning settings;
  2. Evaluate coding and computational thinking educational designs critically using a multi-ontological framework that encompasses different theories of education, learning and human development;
  3. Develop their competences and skills in using educational coding software.
Assessments
  • Oral, Audio Visual or Practical Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "From Computing to Computational Thinking" by Paul S. Wang
    ISBN: 1482217651.
    Publisher: Chapman and Hall/CRC
The above information outlines module ED6170: "Coding and Computational Thinking " and is valid from 2019 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required ED6172: Conversations in Critical Educational Thought ii


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

This module draws together the education policy context with key philosophical idea from the field of philosophy of education. The purpose of this module is to critically explore a number of policy developments using a range of philosophical concepts and ideas. The module will be very applied to issues and dilemmas arising in school contexts with a key purpose of contributing to enriching the discourse among professionals thereby enhancing individual teacher and collective school responses to policy developments. Learning in this module will aim to inform a deepening appreciation of critical issues, questions and themes in educational policy and practice. Students will engage with a variety of philosophers and their views and influences on the provenance and development of some of the most influential philosophies of education. Over the course of the module, the philosophical perspectives explored will be used to critique key features of the current education system. The purpose here is to enrich and enhance participants critical perspective with a view to being empowered to challenge, in an informed way, elements of the education system. The module will draw on a range of current practices and will focus explicitly the purpose and value of evaluation, curriculum and assessment and inclusion.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. • Demonstrate an understanding of the major traditions in philosophy of education from Plato and Aristotle to contemporary work in the discipline and engage in the application of thse ideas to contemporary school policy contexts
  2. • Articulate a rationale for their own view of education’s role in the world, framed by key themes in the philosophy of education.
  3. • Understand the ways in which work in philosophy has opened up avenues for exploration of issues pertaining to ethical and value-oriented concerns in education and be able to take a stand on these matters.
  4. • Develop the ability to engage in debates over current and contested issues in education.
  5. • Appreciate the ways in which philosophical questions can enhance pedagogy in schools by enriching teachers' understanding of issues such as nature and purposes of different forms of education, standards, performance and assessment, knowledge and imagination, multiculturalism, democratic values etc.
Assessments
  • Oral, Audio Visual or Practical Assessment (40%)
  • Research (60%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Plato and education" by Barrow
    Publisher: Routledge
The above information outlines module ED6172: "Conversations in Critical Educational Thought ii" and is valid from 2019 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required ED6168: Mobile Learning


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

This module will develop students' skills in the development and application of mobile ICTs (information and communications technologies) to enhance learning and pedagogy. The focus of the course will be hands-on with students working practically with application programming interfaces (APIs), and computer software and hardware, specifically related to the design, deployment and evaluation of mobile learning in educational contexts and schools.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Design, develop and implement mobile information and communications technologies (ICTs) to enhance engagement and learning in classrooms and other educational settings, as relevant to the student’s respective teaching/educational background and context;
  2. Undertake effectively co-operative and participatory evaluation with learners as co-designers, in concordance with latest research and best practices in learner-centred technology design;
  3. Discuss and outline key contemporary developments and trends in mobile educational technology design.
Assessments
  • Oral, Audio Visual or Practical Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module ED6168: "Mobile Learning" and is valid from 2019 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Year 2 (90 Credits)

Required ED6174: Minor Thesis: Master in Education


Semester 1 and Semester 2 | Credits: 30

This is a minor thesis module
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate a critical awareness of the proposed research topic by providing a clear rationale for the research objectives and design.
  2. Demonstrate understanding of a range of standard and more specialised research or equivalent tools and techniques of enquiry appropriate to the chosen research field.
  3. Demonstrate compliance with recommended ethical guidelines in planning and conducting research.
  4. Demonstrate capacity to select from, scrutinise, reflect upon and critically evaluate data in the context of set research objectives.
  5. Synthesise research findings and critically evaluate in the context of existing knowledge in the chosen field.
  6. Demonstrated insight into the chosen research field by making recommendations that effectively communicate the outcomes and implications of the research.
  7. Demonstrate a systematic understanding of knowledge informed by the forefront of learning in their chosen research field by conducting a literature review in the area.
Assessments
  • Research (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Writing the Winning Thesis or Dissertation" by Randy L. Joyner,William A. Rouse,Allan A. Glatthorn
    ISBN: 9781544317205.
    Publisher: Corwin
    Chapters: All
  2. "Fieldwork in Educational Settings" by Sara Delamont
    ISBN: 9781317637363.
    Publisher: Routledge
The above information outlines module ED6174: "Minor Thesis: Master in Education " and is valid from 2019 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required ED6173: Research Methods


Semester 1 | Credits: 10

This module aims to encourage a systematic and critical approach to educational research, and to provide insight into the range of qualitative and quantitative methodologies available to the researcher so as to inspire and guide participants’ own research. The module explores the theoretical and methodological issues associated with research design, sampling, data collection, data analysis, and presentation of data/findings across quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methodologies including case study, action research, design-based, and narrative approaches. The module also provides an introduction to statistical analysis of quantitative data using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS).
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Adopt a critical stance in their reading of quantitative and qualitative research papers.
  2. Identify and justify appropriate methods (quantitative, qualitative or mixed-methods) for investigating a well refined research question(s) in the context of their thesis project.
  3. Refine research question/s and select appropriate methods.
  4. Design, plan and carry out small-scale quantitative, qualitative and mixed-methods research
  5. Conduct basic descriptive and inferential analyses using SPSS and report and present findings appropriately;
  6. Analyse qualitative data using appropriate techniques and report and present findings in an aligned manner;
  7. Reflect on the role of the researcher in the research process.
  8. Understand and explain the key ethical responsibilities they have as a researcher in research involving human participants (especially that involving vulnerable populations).
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Designing and doing survey research" by Andres, L.
    Publisher: Sage
  2. "On the theoretical breadth of design-based research in education" by Bell, P.L. / Educational Psychologist
  3. "Researching marginalised groups" by Bhopal, K. and Deuchar, R.
    Publisher: Rooutledge
  4. "Ethics and education research" by Brooks, R., Riele, K.T., & Maguire, M.
    Publisher: Sage
  5. "Research Methods in Education" by Cohen, L., Mannion, L., & Morrison, K.
    Publisher: Routledge
  6. "The Sage Handbook of Qualitative Research" by Charmaz, K., Thornberg, R., Keane, E.
    Publisher: Sage
    Chapters: Evolving grounded theory and social justice inquiry
  7. "Designing and conducting mixed-methods research" by Creswell, J.W., & Plano Clark, V.L.
    Publisher: Sage Publications Ltd
The above information outlines module ED6173: "Research Methods" and is valid from 2019 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Why Choose This Course?

Career Opportunities

Roles of responsibility in ICT and educational technology in schools and a range of learning settings; opportunities for doctoral study in educational technology/design-based research; educational technology consultancy.

Who’s Suited to This Course

Learning Outcomes

 

Work Placement

Study Abroad

Related Student Organisations

Course Fees

Fees: EU

€4,630 p.a. 2019/20

Fees: Tuition

€4,406 p.a. 2019/20

Fees: Student levy

€224 p.a. 2019/20

Fees: Non EU

€14,250 p.a. 2019/20

Find out More

Dr Tony Hall
T: +353 91 492 153
E: tony.hall@nuigalway.ie

Downloads

  • School of Education brochure 2019

    School of Education brochure 2019 PDF (3mb)

  • Postgraduate Taught Prospectus 2019

    Postgraduate Taught Prospectus 2019 PDF (12.6 MB)