Course Overview

The MA in Film Studies: Theory and Practice is a pioneering programme that prepares students for a range of careers in film, screenwriting and media related areas. The film and media industries today offer a broad mix of employment opportunities, including in academia, film and media practice and arts administration. This programme responds to this changing environment combining a strong academic focus on the critical and historical study of film with modules incorporating aspects of digital film practice, screenwriting or reflecting on film’s role in arts administration and festival curation. This programme allows students to pursue either an academic focused pathway or a practice-based approach to film, including the possibility of completing a feature-length screenplay during the academic year.

Applications and Selections

To see, in advance, what supporting documents are required to supplement your online application please visit: www.nuigalway.ie/postgrad/pac_supp_docs_taught_arts.html

Who Teaches this Course

Lecturers on the programme include:

Dr. Seán Crosson, M.Phil, PhD
Seán Crosson is the programme director and contributes modules on Irish Cinema and research methods. His research interests include Irish cinema and Sport cinema and his current research project examines the representation of sport in film in Ireland and internationally. His publications include Sport and Film (Routledge, 2013), the co-edited volumes Contemporary Irish Film: New Perspectives on a National Cinema (Braumüller, 2011) and The Quiet Man ... and Beyond: Reflections on a Classic Film, John Ford and Ireland (Liffey Press, 2009); and a broad range of journal articles and book chapters on aspects of Irish film and Sport cinema.

Dr. Conn Holohan, M.A., PhD
Conn Holohan lectures on modules in Critical Theory, Gender, Sexuality & Cinema and Digital Film and Culture. His research interests include space and place in cinema, Deleuzian film theory and short films. His publications include Cinema on the Periphery: Contemporary Irish and Spanish Cinema (Irish Academic Press 2010) as well as numerous book chapters and articles on space and place in European cinema and short films.

Dr. Tony Tracy, M.A. PhD
Tony lectures on modules in Film History (European and Hollywood), and Film Exhibition, Admin & Education. His research interests include representations of race, gender and ethnicity, Irish cinema, silent film and film education. His publications include articles on all these topics as well as co-edited collections on John Huston (McFarland, 2008) and Masculinity and Irish Popular Culture (Palgrave, 2014). He is founding editor of the annual review of Irish film and TV in Estudios lrlandeses.

Requirements and Assessment

Assessments on the programme are designed to develop students’ writing and presentation skills, as well as their ability to undertake individual and group work and to critically assess their own work and that of their peers. Assessments include essays, presentations, and blog or journal postings, as well as exercises in digital practice, module design and festival curation.  Students have the opportunity to specialise in a particular aspect of the programme through a  16,000–18,000 word minor dissertation OR a practice-based project consisting of a video essay accompanied by a 7,000-word dissertation, which is submitted in early August.

Key Facts

Entry Requirements

NQAI Level 8 degree or equivalent, H2.2. GPA 3.0 or equivalent international qualification. Students who do not meet the honours degree requirement but have a Level 7 degree (Merit 1) may be admitted to the PDip course with the possibility of progressing to the MA if they receive a minimum of 60% in their course work during the year. Applicants are required to submit a writing sample consisting of either a graded academic essay or a review essay of a recent film (1,000 words) and a personal statement with their application.

Additional Requirements

Duration

1 year, full-time | 2 years, part-time

Next start date

September 2019

A Level Grades ()

Average intake

15

Closing Date

You are advised to apply early, which may result in an early offer; see the offer round dates

NFQ level

Mode of study

Taught

ECTS weighting

MA—90, PG Dip—60

Award

MA, PDip. Students may only apply for the MA in Film Studies. Those who do not meet the minimum entry requirements may be admitted with relevant professional experience via a qualifying exam, or be admitted to the PDip.

CAO

Course code

1FU4 full-time | 1FU5 part-time

Course Outline

The course may be taken as a full-time degree taken over a twelve-month period (September to August) OR as a Part-Time Degree taken over a twenty-four month period. The year is divided into two teaching semesters (September to December and January to April). The summer period (year 2 in the Part-Time programme) will be used to complete an 18,000 minor dissertation OR undertake a practice-based project consisting of either a video essay accompanied by a 7000 word extended essay OR a feature-length screenplay. The full-time programme comprises four core seminar courses during the academic year and a choice of a range of options (plus a research methods seminar) over two 12-week semesters. Part-time students will take half of these modules each year.

  Core modules:

  • Critical Theory I & II (Semester 1 and 2)
  • Film History I: Hollywood & Genre
  • Digital Film & Culture

Optional Modules may include:

  • Film History II: Cinema Beyond Hollywood since 1945
  • Ireland on Screen
  • Gender, Sexuality and Cinema
  • Screenwriting Fundamentals
  • Screenplay Development
  • Digital Play & Practice
  • Film Exhibition, Admin & Education

Module details for full time course

Module details for part time course

Curriculum Information

Curriculum information relates to the current academic year (in most cases).
Course and module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Glossary of Terms

Credits
You must earn a defined number of credits (aka ECTS) to complete each year of your course. You do this by taking all of its required modules as well as the correct number of optional modules to obtain that year's total number of credits.
Module
An examinable portion of a subject or course, for which you attend lectures and/or tutorials and carry out assignments. E.g. Algebra and Calculus could be modules within the subject Mathematics. Each module has a unique module code eg. MA140.
Optional
A module you may choose to study.
Required
A module that you must study if you choose this course (or subject).
Semester
Most courses have 2 semesters (aka terms) per year.

Year 1 (90 Credits)

Required FM521: Critical Theory I


Semester 1 | Credits: 10

This course aims to provide a critical understanding of the ways in which theories of film have been formulated and applied, relating these theories to their historical and cultural context, and testing out their application to specific texts.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate a specific and comparative knowledge of various theoretical approaches to cinema;
  2. Analyse specific texts in structural, formal and historical terms;
  3. Demonstrate an enhanced awareness of film aesthetics and film cultures;
  4. Work in flexible, creative and independent ways, showing self-direction, self-discipline and reflexivity;
  5. Demonstrate skills in written, oral and visual communications.
Assessments
  • Department-based Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Film art" by David Bordwell, Kristin Thompson
    ISBN: 0070064393.
    Publisher: McGraw-Hill
  2. "Film theory and criticism" by edited by Leo Braudy, Marshall Cohen
    ISBN: 0195365623.
    Publisher: Oxford University Press
  3. "Readings and writings" by Peter Wollen
    ISBN: 0860910555.
    Publisher: Verso
  4. "Hitchcock's films revisited" by Robin Wood
    ISBN: 0231126956.
    Publisher: Columbia University Press
  5. "Image, music, text" by Roland Barthes; essays selected and translated [from the French] by Stephen Heath
    ISBN: 0006861350.
    Publisher: Fontana
  6. "Movies and methods" by edited by Bill Nichols
    ISBN: 0520031512.
    Publisher: University of California Press
  7. "Audio-vision" by Michel Chion; edited and translated by Claudia Gorbman; with a foreword by Walter Murch
    ISBN: 0231078986.
    Publisher: Columbia University Press
The above information outlines module FM521: "Critical Theory I" and is valid from 2014 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required FM512: Film History I


Semester 1 | Credits: 10

The aim of this course is to provide an overview of American film history from its ‘classical’ period; (c. 1930-1960’). This overview will take as its organising principle the dominance of genre as a structuring principle for American film, exploring the concept and a number of genres in detail. The course will also explore the manner in which industrial, social, creative and political factors have intersected with this organising concept over the period under consideration. Finally the course will outline the demise of the Studio System beginning in the early 1960s.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Identify the centrality of genre in the construction of mainstream Hollywood narrative cinema.
  2. Demonstrate familiarity with the ideological and socio-political contexts within which Hollywood cinema has been produced
  3. Demonstrate skills in written, oral and visual communications.
Assessments
  • Department-based Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "The Female of the Species" D. W. Griffith: Father of the Woman's Film'," by Scott Simmon,
  2. "Artful Racism, Artful Rape: Griffith's Broken Blossoms, "Home is Where the Heart Is" by Julia Lesage,
  3. "More Sinned Against than Sinning: The Fabrications of Pre-Code Hollywood'." by Richard Maltby,
  4. "Film History" by Gregory Black
    Chapters: Hollywood Censored: The Production Code Administration and the Hollywood Film Industry
  5. "Pre-Code Hollywood: Sex, Immorality, and Insurrection in American Cinema," by Thomas Doherty
    Publisher: Columbia University Press
  6. "Public Enemies, Public Heroes: Screening the Gangster," by Jonathan Munby,
    Chapters: 2
  7. "‘Apes and Essences: Some Sources of Significance in the American Gangster Film’" by Edward Mitchell
  8. "Home is Where the Heart is" by Thomas Elsaesser,
  9. "Melodrama and the Woman's Picture'" by Pam Cook
  10. "Masked Men," by Steven Cohan
  11. "TheWestern: Or the American Film par excellence.’" by Andre Bazin,
  12. "The Evolution of theWestern’" by Andre Bazin,
  13. "Westerners and the Myth of the Past RobinWood, Rio Bravo and Retrospect" by Leo Braudy
  14. "The American Nightmare: Essays on the Horror Film" by Robin Wood
  15. "ForWanda', The Last Great American Picture Show: Hollywood Cinema in the 1970s." by Thomas Elsaesser, Alexander Horwath and Noel King,
    Publisher: Amsterdam University Press
The above information outlines module FM512: "Film History I" and is valid from 2014 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required FM522: Critical Theory II


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

This semester’s course will build on the introduction to film and critical theory offered in semester one. It will examine the questions which have been raised in the last thirty years about the nature of theory and the proper relationship between film and film criticism.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate a specific and comparative knowledge of various theoretical approaches to cinema;
  2. Analyse specific texts in structural, formal and historical terms;
  3. Demonstrate an enhanced awareness of film aesthetics and film cultures;
  4. Work in flexible, creative and independent ways, showing self-direction, self-discipline and reflexivity;
  5. Demonstrate skills in written, oral and visual communications.
Assessments
  • Department-based Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Philosophy and the Moving Image: Refractions of Reality" by John Mullarkey
    ISBN: 9780230582316.
    Publisher: Palgrave MacMillan
  2. "How a film theory got lost and other mysteries in cultural studies" by Robert B. Ray
    ISBN: 0253214386.
    Publisher: Indiana University Press
  3. "Poetics of cinema" by David Bordwell
    ISBN: 9780415977784.
    Publisher: Routledge
  4. "The art of the ridiculous sublime" by Slavoj Žižek
    ISBN: 0295979259.
    Publisher: Walter Chapin Simpson Center for the Humanities
  5. "The Edinburgh Companion to Poststructuralism" by Benoît Dillet
    ISBN: 074864122X.
    Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
  6. "Postmodernism, or, The cultural logic of late capitalism" by Fredric Jameson
    ISBN: 0860915379.
    Publisher: Verso
The above information outlines module FM522: "Critical Theory II" and is valid from 2014 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional FM6106: Gender, Sexuality and Cinema


Semester 1 | Credits: 10

This course integrates a review of the most influential critical and theoretical approaches to the issues of gender and sexuality in cinema with detailed case studies of both mainstream and independent films. The course addresses and examines debates in psychoanalysis, feminism and queer theory and considers how they might be productively applied to film. It explores the range of textual and contextual factors that combine to produce meaning around cinema.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate a specific and comparative knowledge of various theoretical approaches to gender and sexuality.
  2. Productively apply these approaches to individual films and film movements.
  3. Analyse specific texts in structural, formal and historical terms.
  4. Work in flexible, creative and independent ways, showing self-direction, self-discipline and reflexivity.
  5. Demonstrate skills in written, oral and visual communications.
Assessments
  • Department-based Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Women in Film Noir" by E. Ann Kaplan (ed.)
    Publisher: BFI
  2. "Home is Where the Heart Is: Studies in Melodrama and the Women’s Film" by Christine Gledhill (ed.)
    Publisher: BFI
  3. "Motherhood and Representation" by E. Ann Kaplan
    Publisher: Routledge
  4. "The Desire to Desire: The Woman’s Film of the 1940s" by Mary Ann Doane
    Publisher: Indiana University Press
  5. "Men, Women, and Chain Saws: Gender in the Modern Horror Film" by Carol Clover
    Publisher: BFI
  6. "The Matter of Images: Essays on Representation" by Richard Dyer
    Publisher: Routledge
  7. "New Queer Cinema: A Critical Reader" by Michelle Aaron (ed.)
    Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
  8. "What a Girl Wants: Fantasizing the Reclamation of Self in Postfeminism" by Diane Negra
    Publisher: Routledge
The above information outlines module FM6106: "Gender, Sexuality and Cinema " and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional FM6101: Ireland on Screen


Semester 1 | Credits: 10

This module provides students with an overview of Irish cinema from the early twentieth century to the present. It includes an analysis of the major films produced and the discourses concerning cinema in Ireland over the past one hundred years. Among the questions the module examines are: what are the major traditions of representing Ireland in cinema? How have indigenous filmmakers responded to these representations? What are the distinctive characteristics of contemporary Irish film culture?
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Comprehend the major issues and debates surrounding ‘national cinema’.
  2. Recognise patterns in the representation of Ireland in international cinema.
  3. Recall the major developments in the history of cinema in Ireland and examine key texts.
  4. Analyse the major themes apparent in contemporary Irish cinema.
  5. Evaluate the challenges and advantages of film-making in Ireland today.
Assessments
  • Department-based Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Irish national cinema" by Ruth Barton
    Publisher: Routledge
  2. "Contemporary Irish Film: New Perspectives on a National Cinema." by Werner Huber & Sean Crosson
    Publisher: Braumüller
The above information outlines module FM6101: "Ireland on Screen" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional FM500: Screen Writing Fundamentals


Semester 1 | Credits: 10

The course has three core objectives: - To teach the craft of screenwriting; the ‘tools of the trade’. - To help students find their own ‘voice’ as writers in an encouraging, supportive environment. - To help students develop critical and analytical script editing skills, within a wider understanding of film as both art form and industry.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand the fundamentals of screenwriting and the various different theoretical approaches.
  2. Analyze film according to these approaches.
  3. Grasp the idea of story structure and how this applies to the visual medium of cinema, both in the classical and non-conventional narrative sense.
  4. Appreciate the importance of genre in its various forms and conventions.
  5. Absorb learned theory into individual, practical experience of the craft of screenwriting.
  6. Learn to critique their own and other’s work, and understand the importance of collaboration in the process of filmmaking.
Assessments
  • Department-based Assessment (100%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module FM500: "Screen Writing Fundamentals" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional FM562: Video Essay


Semester 2 | Credits: 30

Assessments
  • Department-based Assessment (100%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module FM562: "Video Essay" and is valid from 2014 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional FM6102: Digital Play & Practice


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

This module aims to explore the landscape of current innovations in digital media technologies across a range of arts disciplines. The module will explore emerging technologies in digital arts such as Virtual Reality (Film/ Animation/Gaming/Experiences), Augmented Reality, Holography, 3D Projection Mapping. Students will follow a design thinking approach to develop digital media prototypes.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Comprehend and describe key issues and debates surrounding the development and evolution of new media technologies.
  2. Demonstrate competence in the creation and production of a piece of digital media project.
  3. Demonstrate competence in problem solving, creative and strategic thinking.
  4. Consider and evaluate their own work in a reflexive manner, with reference to academic and/or professional issues and debates.
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "You Can Find Inspiration In Everything*: *And If You Can't, Look Again" by Paul Smith
    Publisher: Thames & Hudson Ltd
  2. "The Johns Hopkins Guide to Digital Media" by Marie-Laure Ryan, Lori Emerson, and Benjamin J. Robertson
    Publisher: John Hopkins University Press
  3. "Change by Design: How Design Thinking Transforms Organizations and Inspires Innovation" by Tim Brown
    Publisher: HarperCollins
  4. "The Art of Innovation: Lessons in Creativity from IDEO, America's Leading Design Firm" by Tom Kelley, Jonathan Littman
    Publisher: Broadway Business
  5. "Digital Filmmaking" by Mike Figgis
    Publisher: Faber and Faber
The above information outlines module FM6102: "Digital Play & Practice" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional FM6100: Film exhibition, administration and education


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

This innovative module provides student with an introduction to important cultural areas increasingly relevant to film studies, film administration, education and curation. Structured around sessions with practitioners from each of these areas, this module provides students with crucial insights into the distinctive requirements and possibilities in each of these spheres and prepares them for potential employment opportunities in these areas.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. demonstrate an understanding of historical contexts in the distribution and exhibition of film
  2. Understand practical and theoretical issues surrounding the distribution and exhibition of digital cinema
  3. Undertake independent research into current case studies in the marketing, distribution and exhibition of film (incl festivals)
  4. Demonstrate an understanding of practices around film programming in a range of cinematic and festival contexts
  5. Develop an awareness and understanding of the work of developing young audiences and filmmakers
  6. Gain experience in the programming of a film programme
  7. Gain an understanding of the work and theoretical issues within film preservation and archiving
Assessments
  • Department-based Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "The death of cinema: History, cultural memory and the digital dark age" by Paolo Cherchi Usai
    Publisher: BFI
  2. "Film Festivals: Culture, People, and Power on the Global Screen" by Cindy Hing-Yuk Wong
    Publisher: Rutgers University Press
The above information outlines module FM6100: "Film exhibition, administration and education" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional FM514: Minor Dissertation


Semester 2 | Credits: 30

Learning Outcomes
  1. demonstrate the ability to undertake independent study;
  2. demonstrate presentation skills in giving an overview of research question and methodology
  3. to demonstrate skills which are associated with library-based study including effective use of bibliographic searches, the identification of relevant sources and the critical interpretation and correct referencing of sources.
  4. Demonstrate skills in writing a rigorous, coherent and well-supported argument
  5. complete a 18,000 word dissertation
Assessments
  • Research (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "MLA handbook for writers of research papers" by Joseph Gibaldi
    ISBN: 873529863.
    Publisher: Modern Language Association of America
The above information outlines module FM514: "Minor Dissertation" and is valid from 2014 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional FM502: Screenplay Development


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

This module follows on from Screenwriting Fundamentals in Semester 1 and is limited to eight students. The module will facilitate and guide students towards the development of a treatment for a feature film. The classes included in this module will also - enable students to develop their craft as visual storytellers. - help students find their own ‘voice’ as writers in an encouraging and creative environment. - explore alternative screen narratives.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Appreciate the power of metaphor and symbolism in the cinematic narrative.
  2. Understand the importance of film as a visual medium.
  3. Develop a treatment for a feature film screenplay
  4. Develop a critical understanding of cinematic language.
Assessments
  • Department-based Assessment (100%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module FM502: "Screenplay Development" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional FM508: Completed Screenplay


Semester 2 | Credits: 30

Students will develop a film idea from treatment stage to completed screenplay.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will demonstrate comprehensive understanding of screenwriting structure and craft in a full-length feature film screenplay.
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module FM508: "Completed Screenplay" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional FM513: Film History II


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

Film History 2: The Impact of Neorealism This module charts the impact of Italian neo-realism on cinema from 1945 onwards. Beginning with Italian neorealism itself, we will trace its influence through the work of Satyajit Ray (India), John Cassavetes (US) and Jean-Luc Godard (France), and influential cinema movements such as Third Cinema, New Hollywood and the contemporary movements Dogma and Iranian cinema.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Identify key figures and movements in cinema after WWII
  2. Demonstrate familiarity with the ideological and socio-political contexts within which the various filmmakers and movements discussed emerged
  3. Demonstrate skills in written, oral and visual communications.
Assessments
  • Department-based Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Course Reader" by Print-that
  2. "Oxford Guide to Film Studies" by John Hill and Pamela Church Gibson,
  3. "” Springtime in Italy : a reader on neo-realism" by David Overbey..
    Publisher: Archon Books
  4. "Italian film in the light of neorealism" by Millicent Marcus,
    Publisher: Princeton
  5. "World cinema : critical approaches" by John Hill and Pamela Church Gibson
  6. "Ashish Rajadhyaksha, “India: Filming the Nation” in The Oxford history of world cinema." by Geoffrey Nowell-Smith..
    Publisher: Oxford University Press
  7. "John Cassavetes, “Shadows and Johnny Staccato” in Cassavetes on Cassavetes" by Ray Carney
    Publisher: Faber
  8. "If..." by Lindsay Anderson & David Sherwin,
    Publisher: Lorrimer
  9. "If..." by Mark Sinker,
    Publisher: BFI
  10. "Questions of Third cinema" by Ed Jim Pines
    Chapters: Paul Willemen, “The Third Cinema question : notes and reflections”
  11. "Hollywood from Vietnam to Reagan." by Robin Wood
    Publisher: Columbia University Press
  12. "The Dogme Manifesto." by Lars Von Trier
  13. "“The making of an Iranian filmmaker: Abbas Kiarostami” in Close up: Iranian cinema, past, present, and future" by Hamid Dabashi..
The above information outlines module FM513: "Film History II" and is valid from 2014 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Why Choose This Course?

Career Opportunities

Why Choose This Course?
As a student on this programme you will experience small, intimate classes providing close interaction with lecturers and industry professionals. Classes are taught by leading film academics and practitioners who have made substantial contributions to their disciplines in Ireland and internationally. This programme is designed for students who want to deepen their knowledge of the world’s cinemas and the very latest approaches to studying them. It will train students in a wide range of film-related careers, including teaching, programming and exhibition, screenwriting, curatorial work, and arts journalism. There are also opportunities for graduates to undertake further research at PhD level. Furthermore, as a student at the Huston School you will be part of a collaborative creative community, working with students across a range of MA programmes to develop your understanding of film theory and practice. You will also have all the opportunities which come from studying at one of the world’s top Universities, including access to a range of seminars and high-profile guest speakers, who have in the past included Gabriel Byrne, Laura Mulvey, Seamus McGarvey, Stephen Rea, Lenny Abrahamson, Mark O’Halloran, Colin McArthur, James Cromwell, John Boorman, Evan Goldberg, Roddy Doyle, John Carney and Atom Egoyan.

Career Opportunities
Graduates have gone on to further research at PhD level and have acquired positions as lecturers and researchers in third level institutions. Graduates have also found employment in a range of film festival, film and media production, and journalism roles, including university lecturer, television producer, publisher’s production assistant, film producer and director, newspaper editor, journalist, teacher, theatre administrator, and film festival programmer.

Who’s Suited to This Course

Learning Outcomes

 

Work Placement

Study Abroad

Related Student Organisations

Course Fees

Fees: EU

€6,200 p.a. 2018/19

Fees: Tuition

€5,976 p.a. 2018/19

Fees: Student levy

€224 p.a. 2018/19

Fees: Non EU

€14,250 p.a. 2018/19

Postgraduate students in receipt of a SUSI grant—please note an F4 grant is where SUSI will pay €2,000 towards your tuition.  You will be liable for the remainder of the total fee.  An F5 grant is where SUSI will pay TUITION up to a maximum of €6,270.  SUSI will not cover the student levy of €224. 

Postgraduate fee breakdown = tuition (EU or NON EU) + student levy as outlined above.

Find out More

Dr Sean Crosson
Huston School of Film & Digital Media
NUI Galway
T:  +353 91 495 687 
E  sean.crosson@nuigalway.ie 
www.filmschool.ie/programmes/mapgrad.dip-film-studies-theory-and-practice

What Our Students Say

Kharma

Kharma Jones |   Current student

I did a lot of research before deciding to apply to NUI Galway for my Masters degree in Film Studies. I knew I wanted a great program, but I also wanted a city that would make me feel at home. Once I arrived to Galway, I realized I would fit right in. The film students and teachers share my passion for film. The program is challenging, but I’ve learned so much. I also can’t say enough about Galway. There’s a lot of opportunity here to gain experience and build a resume, and it’s a beautiful town full of friendly people. I’ve made so many friends here that I’m considering staying!
Gar

Gar O’Brien |   MA Film Studies 2006: Programme Director Galway Film Fleadh

What I really wanted was to be able to study cinema in a more detailed and comprehensive manner than the few classes I had done as an undergraduate. I soon found myself in a class of like-minded individuals where we were guided, supported and encouraged, not only to learn about everything from genre and auteur theory to the relationship between situationist politics and art cinema, but also to find our own voice and express our passion for cinema. This had a profound effect on me and led to my current position as Programme Director of the Galway Film Fleadh, Ireland’s leading film festival and film market. The experience and knowledge attained in my Master’s degree has proven invaluable in negotiating the complex world of the festival circuit.
Aoife

Aoife O'Connor |   MA Film Studies, 2012

For anyone thinking about embarking on a postgraduate course in Film Studies, I cannot recommend the Huston School enough. Students are provided with the tools to engage with film on an academic level but in a congenial environment, something which I feel extremely fortunate to have experienced. It was a brilliant year , studying something which I am passionate about and meeting wonderful people along the way.