Course Overview

The taught MSc in Regenerative Medicine at NUI Galway graduated its one-hundredth student recently. This course focuses on stem cells, gene therapy and tissue engineering, focussing on how they can be applied to develop new therapeutics. The course is the only one of its kind in Ireland. Students who have completed this course have gone to work in pharmaceutical and biomedical companies in Ireland and abroad. Many graduates have chosen to follow research-based careers in this dynamic field and are pursuing PhDs in countries all over the world (Ireland, the UK, Spain, the Netherlands, Austria and America). 

Regenerative Medicine is an exciting emerging discipline, which aims to develop novel therapeutics to repair and regenerate damaged and diseased organs. These therapeutics utilise stem cells, gene therapy, biomaterials, engineered tissue and biologically active compounds. This 12-month taught MSc course will equip you with the skills to participate in this discipline. Modules will address the science behind Regenerative Medicine as well as its application to human disease.

Special features

As part of this MSc course, students will undertake a summer-long, laboratory-based research project. In previous years, these projects have been based at NUI Galway, Galway University Hospital, and in research groups based in Dublin and Maynooth.

The MSc is administered by the Regenerative Medicine Institute (REMEDI), a world-class biomedical research institute recognised as Ireland’s primary centre for stem cell and gene therapy research, and a world leader in the field of regenerative medicine. REMEDI’s main focus is to use cells and genes to regenerate healthy tissues that can be used to repair or replace other tissues and organs with a minimally invasive approach.

REMEDI is home to Ireland’s only stem cell manufacturing facility, CCMI, the Centre for Cell Manufacturing Ireland. This state-of-the art facility will translate, as well as manufacture, research from REMEDI’s programmes into cell-based medicinal products for clinical trials.

Other allied NUI Galway courses

  • Would you like to advance therapeutics to the clinic?  Gain a better understanding of clinical research practice with our MSc Clinical Research.
  • Cellular manufacturing and therapy and the production of advanced medicinal products is quickly evolving as the future of medicine.  To learn more about bioprocessing, click here.
  • Microscopy and imaging of cells and tissue samples is a highly desirable skill for academia and industry alike.  Click here to learn more.

Applications and Selections

Applications are made online via the NUI Galway Postgraduate Applications System. Selection is based on the candidate's academic record at undergraduate level and their aptitude for the programme.

Who Teaches this Course

Requirements and Assessment

Modules are assessed by examinations at the end of Semester One and Semester Two and/or by continuous assessment. A variety of assessments are used throughout the programme, such as essays, projects, laboratory reports and presentations. A thesis based on the laboratory research project must also be submitted.

Key Facts

Entry Requirements

Applicants should have, or should expect to obtain, at least a Second Class Honours degree in a biological / life science, medicine or nursing. Students who have a degree without Honours in a related area and have three or more years of practical experience in the subject area will also be eligible to apply for this course.

Additional Requirements

Duration

1 year, full-time

Next start date

September 2019

A Level Grades ()

Average intake

18

Closing Date

Please refer to the review/closing date webpage.

NFQ level

Mode of study

Taught

ECTS weighting

90

Award

CAO

Course code

1MSR1

Course Outline

The first two semesters will consist of modules covering the scientific principles of stem cells, gene therapy, tissue engineering, immunology and pharmacology. Training in scientific concepts and techniques important to biomedical research takes place via a series of laboratory-based practical sessions. The regulatory issues involved in translating research observation to an approved treatment for patients will be a focus throughout the course. During the summer semester, students embark on individual laboratory-based research projects.

The modules on offer include:

  • Regenerative Medicine;
  • Translational Medicine;
  • Advanced Research Technique;
  • Tissue Engineering;
  • Scientific Writing;
  • Pharmacology;
  • Anatomy;
  • Research Project and Thesis;
  • Physiology-Human Body Function;
  • Introduction to Business;
  • Economic Evaluation in Healthcare;
  • Biostatistics;
  • Bioinformatics.

Curriculum Information

Curriculum information relates to the current academic year (in most cases).
Course and module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Glossary of Terms

Credits
You must earn a defined number of credits (aka ECTS) to complete each year of your course. You do this by taking all of its required modules as well as the correct number of optional modules to obtain that year's total number of credits.
Module
An examinable portion of a subject or course, for which you attend lectures and/or tutorials and carry out assignments. E.g. Algebra and Calculus could be modules within the subject Mathematics. Each module has a unique module code eg. MA140.
Optional
A module you may choose to study.
Required
A module that you must study if you choose this course (or subject).
Semester
Most courses have 2 semesters (aka terms) per year.

Year 1 (60 Credits)

Required REM504: Regenerative Medicine


Semester 1 and Semester 2 | Credits: 10

This module is designed to provide up to date information on stem cell biology and gene therapy with emphasis on current regenerative strategies and clinical trials.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Compare the sources and properties of different stem cell populations.
  2. Discuss the ethical issues assosciated with different types of stem cell.
  3. Explain the role of stem cells in degenerative disease and cancer.
  4. Compare the relative advantages and disadvantages of viral and non-viral gene delivery.
  5. Discuss the principles underpinning stem cell and gene therapies with particular emphasis on current clinical strategies.
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module REM504: "Regenerative Medicine" and is valid from 2018 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required PM208: Fundamental Concepts in Pharmacology


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

This module introduces students to fundamental pharmacological concepts of pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics. A combination of lectures, tutorials and workshops will be used.

Learning Outcomes
  1. describe the main drug targets
  2. interpret dose response curves for agonists, antagonists, inverse agonists
  3. calculate molarities, concentrations, volumes required in making solutions
  4. access and critically analyse and interpret pharmacological data
  5. describe the processes of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion for specific drugs
  6. explain the effects of different routes of administration on absorption of drugs, and effects of food and drug interactions on drug disposition
  7. derive pharmacokinetic data and use them to predict clinical properties of drugs
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (30%)
  • Computer-based Assessment (70%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Pharmacology" by Rang, H.P., Dale, Ritter, Flower & Henderson
    Publisher: Churchill Livingstone
  2. "Principles of Pharmacology" by Golan, D.E., et al
  3. "Lippincott’s Illustrated Reviews Pharmacology" by Harvey, R.A.
The above information outlines module PM208: "Fundamental Concepts in Pharmacology" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required BME405: Tissue Engineering


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

Tissue Engineering (BME405) provides students with a comprehensive overview into the scope and potential of this evolving field. This subject addresses the use of natural, synthetic and ceramic biomaterials as scaffolds in tissue engineering; scaffold function, mechanics and fabrication methods; cellular processes that contribute to tissue dynamics (e.g. morphogenesis, regeneration and repair); cell sources, mechanobiology and the use of bioreactors as biomimetic environments; in vitro and in vivo tissue engineering strategies for bone, cartilage and skin regeneration; and ethical and regulatory issues in tissue engineering. The subject integrates aspects of biomedical engineering, biomaterials science and biology and provides functional clinical examples in this evolving area of technology.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. 1. Discuss the sources, selection and potential challenges of using stem cells for tissue engineering.
  2. 2. Describe the role of cellular fate processes in tissue morphogenesis, repair and regeneration.
  3. 3. Describe the protein structures and composition of native extracellular matrices.
  4. 4. Discuss the functional requirements, design, fabrication and biomaterials selection criteria for tissue engineering scaffolds.
  5. 5. Predict the mechanical behaviour of tissue engineering scaffolds using cellular solids theory.
  6. 6. Use fluid mechanics theory to characterise mechanical stimulation in tissue engineering scaffolds in flow perfusion bioreactors.
  7. 7. Describe experimental techniques in mechanobiology and outline the role of mechanical signals on stem cell differentiation.
  8. 8. Outline the steps involved in the development of in vitro and in vivo strategies for tissue engineering for bone, cartilage and skin regeneration.
  9. 9. Prepare a group poster outlining the study performed during practical laboratory sessions.
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (40%)
  • Continuous Assessment (60%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Principles of Tissue Engineering, R Lanza, R Langer and J Vacanti, Elsevier, (2007). Functional Tissue Engineering, F Guilak, D Butler, S Goldstein, D Mooney (Editor) Springer (2007)." by n/a
The above information outlines module BME405: "Tissue Engineering" and is valid from 2018 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required REM503: Advanced Research Techniques


Semester 1 and Semester 2 | Credits: 10

Students will participate in a series of laboratory and computer-based practicals. These are designed to give a detailed understanding of critical techniques currently used in bio-medical research.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Perform the calculations required to prepare solutions of known concentration from component chemicals and/or stock solutions.
  2. Use Excel software to plot data and error bars, use linear regression to plot ‘best fit lines’ for standard curves, determine the line equation, calculate the value of an unknown by comparison to known standards.
  3. Describe the purpose and the potential application of the techniques covered in the module and the relevant controls required.
  4. Use the National cancer and Biological Institute nucleotide database to obtain the accession detailing a DNA sequence and/or a protein, the coding sequence and the number of exons.
  5. Use the BLAST algorithm to design specific primer pairs for real time PCR.
  6. Write a laboratory report including an introduction, detailed methods, results and a conclusion.
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module REM503: "Advanced Research Techniques" and is valid from 2018 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required REM508: Graduate Course in Basic and Advanced Immunology


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

A 1-semester, Master's level module focussed on basic principles of the immune system and their relevance to human health and disease. The module may also be suitable for PhD students with limited prior immunology teaching who are seeking a basic grounding in immunology that may be relevant to their thesis project.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Identify the primary cellular and non-cellular components of the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system and discuss their development, anatomical locations and functional responses.
  2. Understand how the innate and adaptive arms of the immune systems combine to protect against invasive microbial pathogens and other health threats.
  3. Identify cellular and non-cellular mechanisms of immune regulation and their role in health and disease.
  4. Discuss the immunological basis for autoimmunity, vaccination, transplant rejection, cancer and stem cell therapies.
  5. Be capable of writing a scientifically informative brief review of a topic related to human health that requires detailed understanding of one or more basic aspects of the immune system.
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (80%)
  • Oral, Audio Visual or Practical Assessment (20%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Janeway's Immunobiology" by Kenneth Murphy,Casey Weaver
    ISBN: 9780815345053.
    Publisher: Garland Science
  2. "Lippincott Illustrated Reviews: Immunology" by Doa,Thao Doan, MD,Roger Melvold, PhD,Dr Susan Viselli, PH D,Carl Waltenbaugh, PhD
    ISBN: 9781451109375.
    Publisher: Lippincott Williams&Wilkins
  3. "Immunology" by Peter M. Lydyard,Alex Whelan,Michael W. Fanger
    ISBN: 9780415607537.
    Publisher: Taylor & Francis
  4. "Case Studies in Immunology" by Raif S. Geha,Luigi Notarangelo
    ISBN: 9780815345121.
    Publisher: Garland Science Taylor & Francis Group LLC
The above information outlines module REM508: "Graduate Course in Basic and Advanced Immunology" and is valid from 2018 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required BES519: Scientific Writing


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

Based largely on a peer-review exercise, this module aims to provide students with an in-depth understanding of the process of scientific publication. Topics include journal author guidelines, review article types, how to write a good review article, how to produce a critique of a review article, how to write to a journal editor and to respond to reviewer comments. Other apsects discussed include open access publishing, paper authorship, the ethics of publication, predatory journals
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Recognise and explain scientific writing
  2. Describe the structure of different kinds of scientific papers
  3. Summarise the different steps in the publication process
  4. Explain the aims, principles and limiations of the peer review process
  5. Produce a well-written critique of a mini-review paper
  6. Respond to peer reviews and write a letter to a journal editor
  7. Produce a well-written mini-review on a specialist topic
  8. Define what is meant by 'journal impact factor' (IF)
  9. Use Journal IFs and other journal information, to select appropriate journals for paper submission
Assessments
  • Department-based Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module BES519: "Scientific Writing" and is valid from 2018 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required BME502: Advanced Tissue Engineering


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

Advanced Tissue Engineering (BME502) builds on the students understanding of the field of tissue engineering obtained through the first semester tissue engineering course. The subject allows for increased involvement of the students in the field through project work and the planning and completion of laboratory experiments. Through regular feedback, the students will gain an appreciation of working in the field of tissue engineering. Specific lecture topics to be covered include bioactive materials, biomimetics and experimental planning, as well as specific subfields of tissue engineering, such as neural, cardiovascular and vital organ regeneration.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. 1. Describe the concepts of wound healing, immunoresponse and angiogenesis and their importance in the field of tissue engineering.
  2. 2. Design and complete an experiment to investigate a tissue engineering concept in vitro.
  3. 3. Describe in vitro and in vivo strategies for various sub-fields of tissue engineering, including, neural, cardiovascular and vital organ regeneration.
  4. 4. Discuss the merit of bioactive materials, biomemetics and biomaterial functionalisation in tissue engineering.
  5. 5. Prepare a grant application for the investigation of a tissue engineering related problem through the development of a novel method of treatment.
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Principles of Tissue Engineering, Langer, Vacanti; Functional Tissue Engineering, Guilak" by n/a
The above information outlines module BME502: "Advanced Tissue Engineering" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required REM502: Translational Medicine


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

The processes of translating novel regenerative therapies, developed from basic research observations, to clinical practice must be developed to ensure that patients and society benefit from regenerative medicine. This course describes the pathway taken as a potential new therapy moves from a research observation to an approved and regulated patient treatment. The overall scope of this module is very broad as it moves from ‘Bench to Bedside’ and ‘Molecules to Populations’ with emphasis on complexities of regenerative medicine. The principles learned for translation of advanced therapeutic medicinal products (ATMPs) such as stem cell or gene therapies, or combinations thereof, provide an overall reference for the translational process underpinning pharmaceutical treatment and medical device development.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Describe the key stages and regulatory requirements of the translational process as a biomedical research development moves to the clinic.
  2. Discuss the ethical principles associated with the translational process.
  3. Describe the pre-clinical process and underpinning Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) for efficacy, safety and toxicology studies.
  4. Detail the regulatory agency requirements for Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) manufacturing and validation of the manufacturing process underpinning the clinical production of ATMPs and pharmaceuticals and medical devices.
  5. Explain the principles of Good Clinical Practice, and the design and implementation of a clinical trial.
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module REM502: "Translational Medicine" and is valid from 2018 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional MG529: Introduction To Business


Semester 1 | Credits: 10

Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module MG529: "Introduction To Business" and is valid from 2014 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional MD511: Introduction to Biostatistics I


Semester 1 | Credits: 10

The module is designed to provide an introduction to the basics in Biostatistics, to enable students understand concepts of population distribution, sampling, probability, data type and presentation, statistical inference and hypothesis testing.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. To demonstrate the importance and practical usefulness of statistics
  2. To encourage and equip students to apply simple statistical techniques to design, analyse and interpret studies in a wide range of disciplines
  3. To enable students to communicate the results of their analyses in clear non-technical language in writing up laboratory reports and projects
  4. To make students aware of the limitations of simple techniques and encourage them to seek expert advice when more complex procedures are required
  5. To utilise a statistical package on a computer to illustrate the power of statistical techniques and avoid tedious arithmetic
  6. To provide examples of the uses of statistics in situations of relevance to students' other courses
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module MD511: "Introduction to Biostatistics I" and is valid from 2018 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional PM209: Applied Concepts in Pharmacology


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

This module introduces students to autonomic pharmacology and drug discovery and development. A combination of lectures, tutorials and workshops will be used.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Describe the process of adrenergic and cholinergic neurotransmission including receptors and transporters.
  2. Relate drug mechanism of action to autonomic neurotransmission
  3. Describe how new molecular entities are discovered and developed into drug candidates for human clinical trials
  4. Summarize the clinical trial process including adverse effects
  5. Derive dose-response curves for agonists and antagonists in the ANS
  6. Interpret clinical trial data
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (30%)
  • Computer-based Assessment (70%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Pharmacology" by Rang, H.P., Dale, Ritter, Flower & Henderson
    Publisher: Churchill Livingstone
  2. "Principles of Pharmacology" by Golan, D.E
  3. "Lippincott’s Illustrated Reviews Pharmacology" by Harvey, R.A
The above information outlines module PM209: "Applied Concepts in Pharmacology" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional SI317: Human Body Function


Semester 1 | Credits: 10

The ‘Human Body Function’ module teaches students the complex nature of how the mammalian body functions through the study of its component organ systems. Specifically, the following areas are covered: Body fluids and fluid compartments, haematology, nerve and muscle physiology, cardiovascular physiology, respiratory physiology, immunology and endocrinology.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Know the distribution of water between the body fluid compartements and understand the role of body water in cell and system function.
  2. Know the components of blood, understand the process of blood clotting and understand the principles of the ABO and rhesus blood groups.
  3. Know the structure and function of nerve and muscle cells.
  4. Understand how a nerve impulse is generated and propagated.
  5. Understand the process of muscle contraction, and how nerves can stimulate muscle cells.
  6. Understand the autonomic nervous system.
  7. Know the structure and function of the heart and its electrophysiology, focusing on the electrical and mechanical events at each stage of the cardiac cycle.
  8. Know the importance of blood pressure, and understand the basic principles of regulation.
  9. Understand how breathing is performed and know the volumes and capacities associated with respiration.
  10. Understand how oxygen and carbon dioxide are transported, and how oxygen delivery is regulated and controlled.
  11. Understand the basics of hormone function, with a focus on glucose metabolism and the functions of growth hormone.
  12. Understand the basics of immune defense.
  13. Know the divisions of the central nervous system and have a basic knowledge of how the different areas function.
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (70%)
  • Continuous Assessment (30%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Human Physiology" by Stuart Ira Fox
  2. "Introduction to the Human Body" by Tortora & Derrickson
The above information outlines module SI317: "Human Body Function" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional AN230: Human Body Structure


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

Human Body Structure is delivered by the anatomy department to students at the first, second and masters level in university for whom anatomy is not a core degree element who require a sound basic knowledge of the structure of the human body. The content will cover topics including the following: * Organisation of human body, anatomical terminology, the principles of support and movement, the control systems of the human body, maintenance and continuity of the body and finally, biomechanics and functional anatomy of the limbs.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Established a sound basic knowledge of the organization and structure of the human body including the location and anatomical relations of the major organ systems
  2. Developed a basic understanding of the principles of support and movement, the control systems of the body, maintenance and continuity of the human body.
  3. Understand and describe the biomechanics and functional anatomy of the human limbs and musculoskeletal system
  4. Explain how specific aspects of human anatomy relate to your field of study
  5. Begun to develop your ability to look up and synthesize anatomical subject matter in a self-directed manner
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (70%)
  • Continuous Assessment (30%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Introduction to the human body" by Gerard J. Tortora, Bryan Derrickson.
    ISBN: 9781118583180.
    Publisher: New York; Wiley
  2. "Human Anatomy" by Michael McKinley,Valerie O'Loughlin,Ronald Harris,Elizabeth Pennefather-O'Brien
    ISBN: 9780073525730.
    Publisher: McGraw-Hill Science/Engineering/Math
    Chapters: 2019-08-12T00:00:00
The above information outlines module AN230: "Human Body Structure" and is valid from 2018 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional MD1528: First in Human, Early Phase Clinical Trials


Semester 1 | Credits: 10

This course will introduce researchers to the fundamental elements necessary to conduct First in Man, Early Phase Research in adherence to Good Clinical Practice guidelines using didactic and practical teaching, experiential learning ,inquiry-based and a cooperative learning approach. Researchers will be guided though the meaning of early phase research, study design, safety and clinical oversight, statistical considerations, emergency training, biological specimen management and clinical site preparation with the objective to enable researchers conduct early phase research to standards that surpass audit and inspection requirement.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand and describe the process of translating novel drug/ device from the bench to the bedside
  2. Draft essential documents necessary for the conduct of phase 1 FIM Clinical Trials
  3. Describe dose escalation and dose expansion
  4. define and differentiate pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and the implications of biological specimen management
  5. Identify challenges of conducting phase 1 trials and methods to overcome these
  6. demonstrate an in-depth knowledge of measures to ensure patient safety which includes safety event clinical management, data capture and reporting, Data Safety Monitoring Board Coordination, Investigator Brochure and Data Safety Update Reporting
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (85%)
  • Oral, Audio Visual or Practical Assessment (15%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module MD1528: "First in Human, Early Phase Clinical Trials" and is valid from 2018 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional REM506: Independent Study Module


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module REM506: "Independent Study Module" and is valid from 2014 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional MA324: Introduction to Bioinformatics (Honours)


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

The course will give students an appreciation of the application of computers and algorithms in molecular biology. This includes foundation knowledge of bioinformatics; the ability to perform basic bioinformatic tasks; and to discuss current bioinformatic research with respect to human health.

Learning Outcomes
  1. outline key bioinformatics principles and approaches
  2. discuss the relevance of bioinformatics to medicine
  3. obtain molecular sequence data from public repositories
  4. implement key bioinformatics algorithms by hand on toy datasets
  5. use bioinformatics software tools, including tools for sequence alignment, homology searching, phylogenetic inference and promoter analysis;
  6. describe key high throughput data generation technologies and the steps involved in data pre-processing and basic analysis of these data.
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (70%)
  • Continuous Assessment (30%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Bioinformatics ; Sequence and Genome Analysis" by David W Mount
    ISBN: 9788123909981.
    Publisher: CBS Publishers & Distributors
  2. "INTRODUCTION TO BIOINFORMATICS." by Arthur M. Lesk
    ISBN: 9780195685251.
    Publisher: OUP
  3. "Bioinformatics" by [edited by] Andreas D. Baxevanis, B. F. Francis Ouellette
    ISBN: 9780471383901.
    Publisher: Wiley-Interscience
The above information outlines module MA324: "Introduction to Bioinformatics (Honours)" and is valid from 2015 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Why Choose This Course?

Career Opportunities

Graduates of this course have found employment in biomedical device amd biotechnology companies and clinical research organisations in Ireland and abroad. Many graduates have obtained PhD studentships in Ireland and the UK, as well as in Austria, Germany, Spain, the Netherlands, Canada and the USA. Some graduates have gone on to study medicine, and graduates with clinical backgrounds have progressed to clinical fellowships.

Who’s Suited to This Course

Learning Outcomes

 

Work Placement

Study Abroad

Related Student Organisations

Course Fees

Fees: EU

€8,200 p.a. 2019/20

Fees: Tuition

€7,976 p.a. 2019/20

Fees: Student levy

€224 p.a. 2019/20

Fees: Non EU

€16,400 p.a. 2019/20

100th Graduate

L–R: Course director Linda Howard,  Stephen Verdejo (100th graduate), President and Dean of College of Medicine Nursing and Health Science.

Downloads

  • Postgraduate Taught Prospectus 2019

    Postgraduate Taught Prospectus 2019 PDF (12.6 MB)