Entry Points (2018)
436

Course Overview

Students will study law modules as well as the principal commercial disciplines (accountancy, economics, management and digital business & analytics) or a language. Graduates will understand not only the legal process but also the fundamentals of business. This will prepare graduates to work as lawyers in a corporate environment.
 
Students who wish to qualify professionally as a solicitor will have completed all the modules required by the Law Society. Students who wish to qualify as a barrister will have the option of taking all the modules required by the Honourable Society of King’s Inns through the Legal Professions specialised stream.

Work Placement

 Students will have the opportunity to engage in a professional work placement in a leading law firm, a corporate firm or a public sector organisation. Students on placement will see application of the law in action, and thereby supplement their academic legal education with practical exposure.
 
Students can study abroad at partner institutions around the world, giving them the opportunity to experience legal education in an international setting and to gain a different perspective on the law.
 
Throughout the programme there is an emphasis on acquiring the fundamental practical skills required of lawyers – legal research, writing, oral presentation and advocacy.

Careers prospects

Graduates of the Bachelor of Law and Business programme will have a variety of career paths open to them, depending on the nature of their degrees.

All graduates will be well equipped to work in a corporate legal environment. Graduates of this degree will be ready to sit the professional entrance for the Law Society (solicitor). Graduates who have elected to complete the Legal Professions specialised stream will be ready to sit the professional entrance examinations for the Honourable Society of King’s Inns (barrister). Graduates who have taken the commercial specialisms will be able to seek exemptions from qualifications offered by commercial professional bodies such as the Chartered Institute of Accountants.

Applications and Selections

Who Teaches this Course

Requirements and Assessment

Key Facts

Entry Requirements

Minimum Grade H5 in two subjects and passes in four other subjects at O6/H7 level in the Leaving Certificate, including Irish, English, Mathematics, another language, and any two other subjects recognised for entry purposes.


Additional Requirements

None
Duration

4 years

Next start date

September 2019

A Level Grades (2018)

nuigalway.ie/alevels

Average intake

60

Closing Date

NFQ level

Mode of study

ECTS weighting

Award

CAO

GY250

Course code

Course Outline

Year 1

Law  Modules

Contract Law
Constitutional Law
Tort Law

Business  Modules

Introduction to Financial Accounting
Introduction to Management Accounting

Skills Modules

Understanding the Law

Optional Modules           (10 credits)

Language

Legal French
Legal German
Spanish

Economics

Principles of Microeconomics
Principles of Macroeconomics

Digital Business

Business Information Systems
Information Management for Business

Year 2

Law  Modules

Criminal Law
European Union Law
Company Law

Skills Modules

Mooting

Optional Modules           (25 credits)

Language

Legal French
Legal German
Spanish

Accountancy      

Management Accounting
Business Finance I
International Financial Reporting I

Economics

Applied Microeconomics for Business
Macroeconomics and the Business Environment for Business

Digital Business

Business Information Systems
Cyber Security

Management

Management
Employment Relations

Year 3

Study Abroad  OR  Professional Work Placement      

Year 4

Law  Modules

Land Law
Equity Law
Legal Business & Ethics
Commercial Law

Skills Modules

Guided Research Essay

Specialist Stream (Select 25 ECTs)

Stream 1 – The Legal Professions         

Administrative Law I       
Jurisprudence    
Evidence           
English Land Law

Stream 2 – Accounting  

Taxation I
Management II
Management Accounting III      
International Financial Reporting III         
International Financial Reporting II         

Stream 3 – Economics   

The obligatory modules for this stream are:           

Microeconomics and Public Policy         
Macroeconomics and Public Policy        

Additional Economics modules in this stream may be taken from the following list of options on offer:      

Econometrics
Health Economics          
Money & Banking
Environmental and Natural Resource Economics 
Development Economics
Economics and Philosophy      
International Economics 
Economics of Financial Markets 
Public Economics          
Marine Economics          

Stream 4 – Digital Business & Analytics

Database Technologies 
Decision Modelling and Analytics
Business Intelligence & Analytics
Implementing Digital Innovation 
Advanced Research Topics in Information Systems         

Stream 5 – Management            

Labour Law      
Human Resource Management    
Work in a Global Context          
Business Strategy

Stream 6 – Language     

One of the following language modules are compulsory within this stream

Legal French      
Legal German    
Spanish  

Students will choose from Law & Business modules available to meet the 60 credits (ECTS) requirement per year  

Stream 7 – General

Students can choose from a variety of available modules to meet the 60 credits (ECTS) requirement per year.    

All optional modules may not be available each year. Modules are subject to staff availability and sufficient demand.

Curriculum Information

Curriculum information relates to the current academic year (in most cases).
Course and module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Glossary of Terms

Credits
You must earn a defined number of credits (aka ECTS) to complete each year of your course. You do this by taking all of its required modules as well as the correct number of optional modules to obtain that year's total number of credits.
Module
An examinable portion of a subject or course, for which you attend lectures and/or tutorials and carry out assignments. E.g. Algebra and Calculus could be modules within the subject Mathematics. Each module has a unique module code eg. MA140.
Optional
A module you may choose to study.
Required
A module that you must study if you choose this course (or subject).
Semester
Most courses have 2 semesters (aka terms) per year.

Year 1 (60 Credits)

Required LW3120: Understanding the Law


Semester 1 | Credits: 10

In order to grasp the effect of substantive legal rules, it is essential to understand the context of the legal system. A core objective of this intensive, four week module is to provide students with a solid knowledge of the sources of Irish law and how the system works. A concomitant objective is to prepare the student for the ordinary tasks he/she will likely encounter when working as a practising lawyer or in a related field, i.e., the reading, citation and interpretation of statutes and cases; research of law; legal writing; advocacy; etc. In an overarching sense, and utilising a range of innovative teaching and learning methodologies, the module is intended to expand the student’s capacity for critical thought – to help him/her “think like a lawyer.”
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. be well versed in the sources of Irish law;
  2. be familiar with legal terminology;
  3. be familiar with the Irish court structure;
  4. be cognisant of the impact of EU and international law on the Irish legal system;
  5. be able to read and analyse primary and secondary legal sources of law quickly and effectively;
  6. have the ability to perform legal research using both traditional methods and online legal databases
  7. understand the principles of legal citation and know the OSCOLA Ireland system;
  8. write clear, concise and sophisticated prose;
  9. Have an enhanced capacity for critical thought.
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "A Kenneally and J Tully, The Irish Legal System (Dublin, Clarus Press, 2013)" by n/a
  2. "Jennifer Schweppe, Rónán Kennedy, and Lawrence Donnelly, How to think, write and cite: Key skills for Irish law students (Dublin, Round Hall Thompson Reuters, 2nd ed, 2016)" by n/a
The above information outlines module LW3120: "Understanding the Law" and is valid from 2019 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required AY104: Introduction to Financial Accounting


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

The course will provide a good basic foundation in Financial Accounting for both students who do not intend to specialise in Accounting and those who will progress to more advanced study of accounting in the future. Upon course completion, students will be expected to be capable of preparing and interpreting financial statements and have achieved an understanding of the needs of financial statements users.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Accounting Information: Upon completing this section students should be able to: understand the meaning and purpose of accounting; distinguish between financial and management accounting; discuss the accounting requirements of different types of business entities; identify the users of accounting information and discuss their needs; describe the sources of regulation of accounting information; identify the components of financial statements and explain the accruals concept; explain the criteria underlying the presentation of financial statements and understand accounting policies.
  2. Preparation of Financial Accounts: Upon completing this section students should be able to understand the terms used in financial statements, the accounting equation and dual nature of transactions; record transactions in T accounts and balance accounts; extract a trial balance and prepare a statement of comprehensive income and statement of financial position; distinguish between an accrual basis of accounting and a cash basis; calculate accruals and prepayments; understand the meaning of depreciation and calculate straight line and reducing balance depreciation; record the disposal of an asset and calculate the profit or loss on disposal; record the purchase of an asset; understand bad de
  3. Financial Analysis: Upon completion of this section the student should be able to understand the purpose of financial statement analysis; calculate liquidity, gearing, profitability, activity and investor ratios; interpret information given in ratios; and understand the limitations of ratio analysis.
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (80%)
  • Continuous Assessment (20%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Accounting and Finance" by E. J. McLaney,Peter Atrill
    ISBN: 1292012560.
    Publisher: Financial Times/Prentice Hall
The above information outlines module AY104: "Introduction to Financial Accounting" and is valid from 2015 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required LW262: Tort


Semester 1 and Semester 2 | Credits: 10

The objective of this course is to enable students to achieve an in-depth understanding of the principles governing the law of torts, to examine in detail a number of selected torts and to develop a capacity for critical thinking in relation to the principles and torts examined. While the primary focus will be on the law of torts in Ireland, frequent reference will be made to other common law jurisdictions where many of the legal principles governing this area have been developed.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. A firm understanding of the fundamental principles governing Irish Tort Law
  2. An understanding of the key differences between Irish Tort Law and that of the Law of Torts in other jurisdictions
  3. An in-depth understanding of a number of selected torts
  4. The ability to selectively apply the principles of Tort Law to factual situations
  5. The capacity to think critically in relation to the material covered
  6. The capacity to reflect on the impact of Tort Law principles on society
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (80%)
  • Continuous Assessment (20%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Tully J, Tort Law in Ireland (Clarus Press 2014)" by n/a
  2. "McMahon B & Binchy W, Law of Torts (4th edn, Bloomsbury" by n/a
  3. "Quill E, Torts in Ireland (4th edn, Gill & Macmillan 2014)" by n/a
  4. "Healy J, Principles of Irish Torts (Clarus Press 2006)" by n/a
  5. "Connolly U & Quinlivan S, Tort: Cases and Materials (Thomson Roundhall 2006)" by n/a
  6. "McMahon B & Binchy W, A Casebook on Law of Torts (3rd edn, Tottel Publishing 2005)" by n/a
The above information outlines module LW262: "Tort" and is valid from 2019 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required LW117: Constitutional Law


Semester 1 and Semester 2 | Credits: 10

The objective of this module is to provide students with an overview of the fundamental rights protected by the Constitution. It will explore the philosophical and conceptual basis of constitutional rights, the limits of constitutional rights, the role of the judiciary in protecting constitutional rights and the judgments of the superior courts concerning constitutional rights
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Be familiar with the impact of the Constitution on the functioning of the State and the citizens of this State
  2. Understand the importance of the language used in the Constitution when subject to judicial interpretation, and they should be in a position to discuss and assess specific areas of the Constitution and refer to case law, legislation and academic commentary
  3. Understand the dynamics of constitutional reform
  4. Critically assess the strengths and weaknesses of the fundamental rights
  5. Identify areas in need of reform
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (80%)
  • Continuous Assessment (20%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Bunreacht na hÉireann, 1937" by n/a
  2. "Hogan, Whyte, Kenny and Walsh: J.M. Kelly: The Irish Constitution (5th Edition) Bloomsbury Professional, 2018" by n/a
  3. "Michael Forde, Constitutional Law (3rd edn, First Law, October 2013)" by n/a
  4. "Report of the Constitution Review Group (Government Publications 1996)" by n/a
  5. "Oran Doyle, Constitutional Law: Text, Cases and Materials (Clarus Press 2008)." by n/a
  6. "Gerard Hogan and Gerry Whyte, JM Kelly: The Irish Constitution (4th edn, Lexis Nexis Butterworths 2003)." by n/a
The above information outlines module LW117: "Constitutional Law" and is valid from 2019 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required LW118: Contract


Semester 1 and Semester 2 | Credits: 10

The aim of this course is to provide students with knowledge of contract law principles as derived from case law and statute, together with the skills and knowledge necessary to evaluate critically those principles and the scope of their operation; to explain the theoretical and practical context in which contract law principles have evolved and to foster basic legal writing skills and the ability to apply contract law principles to given fact situations.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand the core legal principles of contract law
  2. Apply those legal principles to everyday situations and problems affecting consumers and commercial enterprises
  3. Critically analyse the rules which govern contracts and the policy objectives of those rules
  4. Identify areas of contract law in need of reform
  5. Compare Irish contract law with the law in other jurisdictions, in particular the UK
  6. Use a range of sources referred to in lectures
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (60%)
  • Continuous Assessment (40%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Chen-Wishart, M, Contract Law, 6th edition (Oxford: OUP, 2018 or 2015)" by n/a
  2. "Clark, R, Contract Law in Ireland, 8th edition, (Dublin: Round Hall Press, 2016 or 2013" by n/a
  3. "Clark, R & Clarke, B, Contract Cases and Materials, 3rd edition, (Dublin: Gill & Macmillan, 2004)" by n/a
  4. "Enright, M, Principles of Irish Contract Law, (Dublin: Clarus, 2007)" by n/a
  5. "Furmston, M, Cheshire, Fifoot & Furmston’s Law of Contract, 15th edition, (Oxford: OUP, 2007)" by n/a
  6. "McDermott, P, Contract Law, (Dublin: Butterworths, 2001)" by n/a
  7. "McKendrick, E, Contract Law – Text, Cases and Materials, 4th edition (Oxford: OUP, 2010)" by n/a
  8. "Treitel, G, The Law of Contract, 10th edition, (London: Sweet & Maxwell, 1999)" by n/a
The above information outlines module LW118: "Contract" and is valid from 2019 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required AY105: Introduction to Management Accounting


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

This course is intended to develop in students the skills necessary to prepare, interpret and use accounting and financial information in a business context
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. understand the meaning and purpose of accounting; distinguish between financial and management accounting; understand the role of the management accounting function in business today including costing, planning & control and providing information to support decision making. Students should understand the changing environment in which management accountants operate.
  2. understand cost terminology and the importance of costing. Students should be able to distinguish between direct and indirect costs and be able to calculate costs in a job or process costing environment.
  3. apply their understanding of contribution to marginal analysis techniques used in short-term decisions making. Students should be able to understand the concept of relevant or incremental costs and must be able to distinguish between different types of costs such as opportunity cost and sunk cost.
  4. understand the nature and purpose of budgeting, explain the objectives of budgeting and the budgetary process. Students should be able to prepare: operational budgets, cash budgets, simple variance analysis and understand the interlinking of the various budgets within a business. Students should be able to discuss: the budget process, behavioural aspects of budgeting and criticisms of the budgeting process
  5. understand the difference between fixed and variable costs and contribution margin. Students should be able to apply the techniques required to test the relationship between costs, volume and profit and they should be able to graphically explain these relationships using break-even charts and graphs.
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module AY105: "Introduction to Management Accounting" and is valid from 2019 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional MS120: Business Information Systems


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

The objective of the module is to provide participants with a broad understanding of the fundamental roles, applied impact and strategic importance of information systems (IS) for individuals, for enterprise and for sustainable society.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate an informed understanding of the fundamental roles and strategic importance of IS for business operations and management
  2. Evaluate the relationship between IS and the macro business environment and sustainable development
  3. Critically evaluate the importance and potential impacts of existing and emergent technologies for individuals, businesses and society
  4. Apply theory, models and/or frameworks to analyse and evaluate complex IS-enabled business environments
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (70%)
  • Continuous Assessment (30%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module MS120: "Business Information Systems" and is valid from 2019 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional EC139: Principles of Microeconomics


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

The objective of this course is to introduce the basic concepts and principles of microeconomic theory. Microeconomics is the study of how households and firms make decisions and how they interact in specific markets. In this course students will learn how demand and supply interact to determine market prices and how government intervention can affect market outcomes. Students will also learn how firms make production decisions and will become familiar with different types of market structures, such as monopoly and perfect competition.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand economics as a social science and explain how economists apply scientific methods
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of the core principles of microeconomics
  3. Illustrate and explain the core concepts of supply and demand and explain how a market economy operates
  4. Explain and illustrate how firms make production decisions and differentiate between different types of market structures
  5. Use the key concepts in microeconomics to explain market outcomes and solve microeconomics problems
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (70%)
  • Continuous Assessment (30%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Economics" by Mankiw, G.N. and M.P. Taylor
    Publisher: Cengage Learning
The above information outlines module EC139: "Principles of Microeconomics" and is valid from 2019 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional SH102: Spanish Language I (Beginners)


Semester 1 and Semester 2 | Credits: 10

This ab initio course covers the basic elements of Spanish grammar (including 6 verb tenses) and vocabulary. Activities cover written, oral and aural exercises; class materials include video and audio recordings and texts for study drawn from a wide range of sources. Students are expected to achieve an A2 European Framework of Languages level. A range of oral, aural and written exercises is employed, supplemented by spoken classes and activities in the language laboratory. Written work and class tests are prescribed on a regular basis.
(Language of instruction: Spanish)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand sentences and frequently used expressions related to areas of most immediate relevance (e.g. very basic personal and family information, shopping, local geography, employment).
  2. Communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a simple and direct exchange of information on familiar and routine matters.
  3. Describe in simple terms aspects of their background, immediate environment and matters in areas of immediate need.
  4. Use a basic level of Spanish with basic grammar competency and an average range of vocabulary related to the topics above.
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (30%)
  • Continuous Assessment (40%)
  • Oral, Audio Visual or Practical Assessment (30%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Gramatica de Uso A1-A2" by L. Aragones
    ISBN: 978-846752107.
  2. "Uso Interactivo del Vocabulario A1-B1" by A. Encinar
    ISBN: 978-847711978.
  3. "Socios 1" by M. Gonzalez et al
    ISBN: 978-848443415.
The above information outlines module SH102: "Spanish Language I (Beginners)" and is valid from 2019 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional SH140: Intermediate Spanish Language


Semester 1 and Semester 2 | Credits: 10

This course is open to students who have completed a Higher Leaving Cert assessment in Spanish and obtained a H4 or higher. Students are expected to achieve an A2/B1 European language level. A range of oral, aural and written exercises is employed, supplemented by spoken classes. Written work and class tests are prescribed on a regular basis. Prerequisites: A grade H4 or higher in the Leaving Certificate Honours Spanish examination or equivalent.
(Language of instruction: Spanish)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand the main points of conversation on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school, leisure, etc.
  2. Deal with most situations likely to arise while travelling in an area where the language is spoken.
  3. Produce a simple connected text on topics that are familiar or of personal interest.
  4. Describe experiences and events, dreams, hopes and ambitions and briefly give reasons and explanations for opinions and plans.
  5. Use a basic-intermediate grammar correctly and a good range of vocabulary related to the topics above.
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (30%)
  • Continuous Assessment (40%)
  • Oral, Audio Visual or Practical Assessment (30%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Gramatica de Uso A1 - A2" by L. Aragones
    ISBN: 978-846752107.
  2. "Uso Interactivo del Vocabulario A1-B1" by A. Encinar
    ISBN: 978-847711978.
The above information outlines module SH140: "Intermediate Spanish Language" and is valid from 2019 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional GR106: Legal German


Semester 1 and Semester 2 | Credits: 10

This module is available to students on the Bachelor of Corporate Law and the Bachelor of Civil Law programme. The first year course is designed to consolidate and develop existing language skills. Students are introduced to the German legal system.

Learning Outcomes
  1. read and understand texts that deal with contemporary issues such as young people in Germany and Ireland today and multiculturalism.
  2. write about contemporary issues such as young people in Germany and Ireland today and multiculturalism.
  3. describe aspects of the German legal system, including legal training, the organs of state, the legislative process, the Constitution, and the court structure.
  4. describe his/her first year at university, including their subjects, hobbies and accommodation.
  5. reflect upon his/her language learning and explain the advantages of learning German for personal development and for career prospects.
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (40%)
  • Continuous Assessment (40%)
  • Oral, Audio Visual or Practical Assessment (20%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Essential Grammar of German" by Monika Reimann
    Publisher: Hueber
The above information outlines module GR106: "Legal German" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional GR138: Beginners German for B. Corp Law and BCL students


Semester 1 and Semester 2 | Credits: 10

This module aims to equip students with basic general language skills and to provide them with an overview of the German legal system.

Learning Outcomes
  1. understand and use elementary structures of German grammar in oral and written expression.
  2. read, understand and answer questions on short German texts.
  3. describe the first year at university, including subject choice, hobbies and accommodation.
  4. explain some aspects of the German legal system, including legal training in Germany and the organs of state.
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (30%)
  • Continuous Assessment (45%)
  • Oral, Audio Visual or Practical Assessment (25%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Studio d A1: Kurs- und Übungsbuch" by n/a
    Publisher: Cornelson
  2. "Studio d A2: Kurs- und Übungsbuch" by n/a
    Publisher: Cornelson
The above information outlines module GR138: "Beginners German for B. Corp Law and BCL students" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional MS1100: Information Management for Business


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

The objective of this course is to advance students’ understanding of business information management by focusing on current issues confronting organisations today.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Evaluate how Information systems (for example Mobile, Enterprise Systems, Personal Information Systems support organisations and individuals
  2. Demonstrate a proficiency in the use of spreadsheets
  3. Explain and critically evaluate the methods used for managing information systems in areas such as IS Development, Cyber Security and Ethics & Privacy
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (90%)
  • Continuous Assessment (10%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Management Information Systems, Moving Business Forward" by R. Kelly Rainer, Hugh J. Watson
    ISBN: 9780470889190.
    Publisher: Wiley
The above information outlines module MS1100: "Information Management for Business" and is valid from 2019 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional EC141: Principles of Macroeconomics


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

The objective of this course is to introduce students to the key concepts of macroeconomics, both theoretical and applied, with an emphasis on understanding macroeconomic data.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Identify the key theoretical ideas underpinning macroeconomic analysis
  2. Relate these theoretical concepts to macroeconomic variables
  3. Derive the central results of a range of macroeconomic models
  4. Apply macro models to a variety of contemporary policy issues
  5. Identify and explore key areas of controversy in macroeconomics
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (65%)
  • Continuous Assessment (35%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Principles of Economics an Irish Text" by G. Turley, M. Maloney and F. O’Toole
    Publisher: Gill and Macmillan
The above information outlines module EC141: "Principles of Macroeconomics" and is valid from 2019 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional LW109: Legal French


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

Assessments
  • Written Assessment (50%)
  • Continuous Assessment (50%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module LW109: "Legal French" and is valid from 2014 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Further Education

Study will also be eligible to qualify to practice law in certain US states, including New York (provided they the Bar Exam) and in England and Wales.

The School of Law offers a range of masters degrees in law (LLMs) for students who wish to enrich their legal education. These include: (i) LLM (General); (ii) LLM in International and Comparative Business Law; (iii) LLM in Public Law; and (iv) LLM in Comparative Disability Law and Policy.

The Irish Centre for Human Rights also offers a range of masters degrees in human rights: (i) LLM in International Human Rights, (ii) LLM in International Criminal Law, (iii) LLM in International Migration and Refugee Law and Policy, and (iv) LLM in Peace Operations, Humanitarian Law and Conflict.

Why Choose This Course?

Career Opportunities

Graduates of the Bachelor of Law and Business programme will have a variety of career paths open to them, depending on the nature of their degrees.

All graduates will be well equipped to work in a corporate legal environment. Graduates of this degree will be ready to sit the professional entrance for the Law Society (solicitor). Graduates who have elected to complete the Legal Professions specialised stream will be ready to sit the professional entrance examinations for the Honourable Society of King’s Inns (barrister).

Graduates who have taken the commercial specialisms will be able to seek exemptions from qualifications offered by commercial professional bodies such as the Chartered Institute of Accountants.

Who’s Suited to This Course

Learning Outcomes

 

Work Placement

Students will have the opportunity to engage in a professional work placement in a leading law firm, a corporate firm or a public sector organisation. Students on placement will see application of the law in action, and thereby supplement their academic legal education with practical exposure.

Students can study abroad at partner institutions around the world, giving them the opportunity to experience legal education in an international setting and to gain a different perspective on the law.

Throughout the programme there is an emphasis on acquiring the fundamental practical skills required of lawyers – legal research, writing, oral presentation and advocacy.

Study Abroad

At the end of second year, interested students may opt to join the Bachelor of Law and Business International programme, which involves spending third year at a university in either mainland Europe or other countries such as Canada, Australia or China. These students would then return to complete their degree programme in Galway in fourth year.  More information on these opportunities is on our International Study page.

Related Student Organisations

Course Fees

Fees: EU

€6,817 p.a. 2019/20

Fees: Tuition

€3,593 p.a. 2019/20

Fees: Student Contribution

€3,000 p.a. 2019/20

Fees: Student levy

€224 p.a. 2019/20

Fees: Non EU

€16,750 p.a. 2020/21

EU Fees 20119/20:
- Tuition: may be paid by the Irish Government on your behalf if you qualify for free tuition fees see - free fee initiative.
- Student Contribution: €3,000 - payable by all students but may by paid by SUSI if you apply and are deemed eligible for a means tested SUSI grant.
- Student Levy:  €224 - payable by all students and is not covered by SUSI.

Find out More

Administrative Offices: Room 406, Floor 2, Tower 2, Concourse (Arts/Science Building)

Office hours:  11.00 - 13.00, 14.00 - 16.00 (Monday – Friday)

Phone: +353 (0)91 492389

Email: law@nuigalway.ie


What Our Students Say

Niamh

Niamh Gallagher |   B Corp Law (now Bachelor of Law & Business)

I was interested in the areas of law that focused on world business, markets and commerce. The Bachelor of Corporate Law (now known as Law & Business) offered me the unique opportunity to study a combination of a language, business and law. It gave me the ability to tailor my degree to fit my areas of interest through the wide range of module choice. Throughout the course, there is a focus on independent, creative and critical thinking. Graduates have the advantage of understanding how the law interacts with the world around us in a business context. I would encourage students to make the most of NUI Galway and the amazing city of Galway.

What Our Students Say

Louis

Louis Coleman |   B Corp Law (now Bachelor of Law & Business)

The Bachelor of Corporate Law integrated two areas of study that were of strong interest to me,law and business. The lecturers were excellent at encouraging engagement and were very approachable. Through the School of Law connections with high profile internship opportunities, I completed an internship with the Office of the Irish Attorney General. This experience is invaluable for the working world.

Downloads

  • Law Prospectus 2018-19

    Law Prospectus 2018-19 PDF (30 KB)

  • Undergraduate Prospectus 2020

    Undergraduate Prospectus 2020 PDF (18.4 MB)

  • Quick Guide to Courses 2020

    Quick Guide to Courses 2020 PDF (2.4 MB)

  • A Level Quick Guide 2020

    A Level Quick Guide 2020 PDF (2 MB)

  • CAO Brochure

    CAO Brochure PDF (1.3 MB)

  • Postgraduate Prospectus 2020

    Postgraduate Prospectus 2020 PDF (20.6 MB)

  • QQI / FETAC Pathways Guide

    QQI / FETAC Pathways Guide PDF (45MB)