Entry Points (2019)
510

Course Overview

The Law & Human Rights programme is an innovative and unique programme – the first of its kind in Ireland. It offers students the opportunity to combine a full undergraduate law programme with the study of human rights.

Students on the programme will be challenged and engaged by a rich curriculum of core and optional law modules.  Students will be trained in key legal skills such as written and oral advocacy; and they will be educated in the principles, theories and doctrines of human rights law and practice.

The School of Law and Irish Centre for Human Rights at NUI Galway are pioneers in legal education and research on human rights.   Students will have access to world leading researchers, writers and lecturers in human rights at the Irish Centre for Human Rights.

Every student is given the opportunity of work placement or study abroad.  Work placement in a leading law firm, a corporate firm or a public sector organisation exposes students to application of the law which will supplement the academic legal education with practical exposure. Study abroad at partner institutions around the world provides students with experience of a legal education in an international setting and a different perspective on the law.

Students on this degree will be able to take French or German as part of their degree. These language options demonstrate the School of Law's committment to ensuring that graduates will be prepared for the globalised nature of law in the twenty-first century.

Applications and Selections

Who Teaches this Course

Every staff member in the law school and human rights centre is involved in some way.

Requirements and Assessment

Key Facts

Entry Requirements

Minimum Grade H5 in two subjects and passes in four other subjects at O6/H7 level in the Leaving Certificate including Irish, English, another language, and any three other subjects recognised for entry purposes.


Additional Requirements

Duration

4 years

Next start date

September 2019

A Level Grades (2019)

nuigalway.ie/alevels

Average intake

15

Closing Date

NFQ level

Mode of study

ECTS weighting

Award

CAO

GY252

Course code

Course Outline

YEAR ONE
• Compulsory core modules:
· Introduction to Human Rights
· Understanding the Law
· Constitutional Law
· Contract Law
· Tort Law
• Optional modules:
· Family Law
· Language (French/German)

YEAR TWO
• Compulsory core modules:
· International Human Rights
· European Human Rights
· Criminal Law
· EU Law
· Mooting
· Guided Research Essay
• Optional modules:
· Information Technology Law/ Housing Law/Intellectual Property Law/ Health Law/ Media Law
· Language  (French/German)

YEAR THREE
• Study Abroad or
• Work Placement

YEAR FOUR
• Compulsory core modules:
· Company Law
· Equity Law
· Land Law
• Specialise in a discipline/stream:
· The Legal Professions
· Business and Commercial Law
· Public Law, Risk ad Regulation
· Human Rights, Crime and Equality
· International, Comparative and Transnational Law
· Language (French/German)

Optional: Elective streams: (i) Human Rights, Crime and Equality; (ii) Legal Professions (for students who wish to complete eligibility for Kings Inns); (iii) International, Comparative and Transnational Law; (iv) General (i.e. no special focus – this is not, technically-speaking a ‘stream’ but rather a default option for students who do not wish to focus on one area); and (v) Language.

Curriculum Information

Curriculum information relates to the current academic year (in most cases).
Course and module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Glossary of Terms

Credits
You must earn a defined number of credits (aka ECTS) to complete each year of your course. You do this by taking all of its required modules as well as the correct number of optional modules to obtain that year's total number of credits.
Module
An examinable portion of a subject or course, for which you attend lectures and/or tutorials and carry out assignments. E.g. Algebra and Calculus could be modules within the subject Mathematics. Each module has a unique module code eg. MA140.
Optional
A module you may choose to study.
Required
A module that you must study if you choose this course (or subject).
Semester
Most courses have 2 semesters (aka terms) per year.

Year 1 (60 Credits)

Required LW262: Tort


Semester 1 and Semester 2 | Credits: 10

The objective of this course is to enable students to achieve an in-depth understanding of the principles governing the law of torts, to examine in detail a number of selected torts and to develop a capacity for critical thinking in relation to the principles and torts examined. While the primary focus will be on the law of torts in Ireland, frequent reference will be made to other common law jurisdictions where many of the legal principles governing this area have been developed.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. A firm understanding of the fundamental principles governing Irish Tort Law
  2. An understanding of the key differences between Irish Tort Law and that of the Law of Torts in other jurisdictions
  3. An in-depth understanding of a number of selected torts
  4. The ability to selectively apply the principles of Tort Law to factual situations
  5. The capacity to think critically in relation to the material covered
  6. The capacity to reflect on the impact of Tort Law principles on society
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (80%)
  • Continuous Assessment (20%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Tully J, Tort Law in Ireland (Clarus Press 2014)" by n/a
  2. "McMahon B & Binchy W, Law of Torts (4th edn, Bloomsbury" by n/a
  3. "Quill E, Torts in Ireland (4th edn, Gill & Macmillan 2014)" by n/a
  4. "Healy J, Principles of Irish Torts (Clarus Press 2006)" by n/a
  5. "Connolly U & Quinlivan S, Tort: Cases and Materials (Thomson Roundhall 2006)" by n/a
  6. "McMahon B & Binchy W, A Casebook on Law of Torts (3rd edn, Tottel Publishing 2005)" by n/a
The above information outlines module LW262: "Tort" and is valid from 2019 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required LW118: Contract


Semester 1 and Semester 2 | Credits: 10

The aim of this course is to provide students with knowledge of contract law principles as derived from case law and statute, together with the skills and knowledge necessary to evaluate critically those principles and the scope of their operation; to explain the theoretical and practical context in which contract law principles have evolved and to foster basic legal writing skills and the ability to apply contract law principles to given fact situations.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand the core legal principles of contract law
  2. Apply those legal principles to everyday situations and problems affecting consumers and commercial enterprises
  3. Critically analyse the rules which govern contracts and the policy objectives of those rules
  4. Identify areas of contract law in need of reform
  5. Compare Irish contract law with the law in other jurisdictions, in particular the UK
  6. Use a range of sources referred to in lectures
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (60%)
  • Continuous Assessment (40%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Chen-Wishart, M, Contract Law, 6th edition (Oxford: OUP, 2018 or 2015)" by n/a
  2. "Clark, R, Contract Law in Ireland, 8th edition, (Dublin: Round Hall Press, 2016 or 2013" by n/a
  3. "Clark, R & Clarke, B, Contract Cases and Materials, 3rd edition, (Dublin: Gill & Macmillan, 2004)" by n/a
  4. "Enright, M, Principles of Irish Contract Law, (Dublin: Clarus, 2007)" by n/a
  5. "Furmston, M, Cheshire, Fifoot & Furmston’s Law of Contract, 15th edition, (Oxford: OUP, 2007)" by n/a
  6. "McDermott, P, Contract Law, (Dublin: Butterworths, 2001)" by n/a
  7. "McKendrick, E, Contract Law – Text, Cases and Materials, 4th edition (Oxford: OUP, 2010)" by n/a
  8. "Treitel, G, The Law of Contract, 10th edition, (London: Sweet & Maxwell, 1999)" by n/a
The above information outlines module LW118: "Contract" and is valid from 2019 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required LW117: Constitutional Law


Semester 1 and Semester 2 | Credits: 10

The objective of this module is to provide students with an overview of the fundamental rights protected by the Constitution. It will explore the philosophical and conceptual basis of constitutional rights, the limits of constitutional rights, the role of the judiciary in protecting constitutional rights and the judgments of the superior courts concerning constitutional rights
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Be familiar with the impact of the Constitution on the functioning of the State and the citizens of this State
  2. Understand the importance of the language used in the Constitution when subject to judicial interpretation, and they should be in a position to discuss and assess specific areas of the Constitution and refer to case law, legislation and academic commentary
  3. Understand the dynamics of constitutional reform
  4. Critically assess the strengths and weaknesses of the fundamental rights
  5. Identify areas in need of reform
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (80%)
  • Continuous Assessment (20%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Bunreacht na hÉireann, 1937" by n/a
  2. "Hogan, Whyte, Kenny and Walsh: J.M. Kelly: The Irish Constitution (5th Edition) Bloomsbury Professional, 2018" by n/a
  3. "Michael Forde, Constitutional Law (3rd edn, First Law, October 2013)" by n/a
  4. "Report of the Constitution Review Group (Government Publications 1996)" by n/a
  5. "Oran Doyle, Constitutional Law: Text, Cases and Materials (Clarus Press 2008)." by n/a
  6. "Gerard Hogan and Gerry Whyte, JM Kelly: The Irish Constitution (4th edn, Lexis Nexis Butterworths 2003)." by n/a
The above information outlines module LW117: "Constitutional Law" and is valid from 2019 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required LW3120: Understanding the Law


Semester 1 | Credits: 10

In order to grasp the effect of substantive legal rules, it is essential to understand the context of the legal system. A core objective of this intensive, four week module is to provide students with a solid knowledge of the sources of Irish law and how the system works. A concomitant objective is to prepare the student for the ordinary tasks he/she will likely encounter when working as a practising lawyer or in a related field, i.e., the reading, citation and interpretation of statutes and cases; research of law; legal writing; advocacy; etc. In an overarching sense, and utilising a range of innovative teaching and learning methodologies, the module is intended to expand the student’s capacity for critical thought – to help him/her “think like a lawyer.”
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. be well versed in the sources of Irish law;
  2. be familiar with legal terminology;
  3. be familiar with the Irish court structure;
  4. be cognisant of the impact of EU and international law on the Irish legal system;
  5. be able to read and analyse primary and secondary legal sources of law quickly and effectively;
  6. have the ability to perform legal research using both traditional methods and online legal databases
  7. understand the principles of legal citation and know the OSCOLA Ireland system;
  8. write clear, concise and sophisticated prose;
  9. Have an enhanced capacity for critical thought.
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "A Kenneally and J Tully, The Irish Legal System (Dublin, Clarus Press, 2013)" by n/a
  2. "Jennifer Schweppe, Rónán Kennedy, and Lawrence Donnelly, How to think, write and cite: Key skills for Irish law students (Dublin, Round Hall Thompson Reuters, 2nd ed, 2016)" by n/a
The above information outlines module LW3120: "Understanding the Law" and is valid from 2019 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required LW3123: Human Rights Law: Theories, Concepts and Contemporary Issues


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

This module introduces students to the study of International Human Rights Law and to core concepts of public international law. Students will be introduced to the UN and regional human rights systems and will explore the development and application of International Human Rights Law through selected contemporary issues. The philosophical foundations of human rights and contemporary debates on human rights will be examined.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the international and regional human rights systems
  2. Apply core concepts of international law to selected human rights issues
  3. Analyse and discuss the conceptual and practical challenges that arise in implementation of international human rights law
  4. Critically assess the development of international human rights law
  5. Analyse and discuss debates on the philosophical foundations of human rights
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Moeckli et al. (eds) International Human Rights Law" by n/a
  2. "Alston and Goodman (eds) International Human Rights" by n/a
The above information outlines module LW3123: "Human Rights Law: Theories, Concepts and Contemporary Issues" and is valid from 2019 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional LW127: Family Law


Semester 1 and Semester 2 | Credits: 10

The objective of this course is to examine the role of law in regulating the family in Ireland. The first semester of the course focuses on the constitutional family, on marriage, marital breakdown, civil partnership, cohabitants’ rights and domestic violence. The second semester focuses on the rights of children and family issues concerning children, including adoption, child protection, child abduction, guardianship, custody and access.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Apply the law to each of the subject areas
  2. Critically analyse the effectiveness of the law in each area
  3. Make effective and substantiated legal arguments
  4. Identify and analyse problems from a legal perspective
  5. Make effective use of primary and secondary materials
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (90%)
  • Continuous Assessment (10%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Jim Nestor, An Introduction to Irish Family Law (4th edn, Gill and Macmillan 2011)" by n/a
  2. "Geoffrey Shannon, Family Law (Law Society 2011)" by n/a
  3. "Louise Crowley, Family Law (Thomson Round Hall 2013)" by n/a
  4. "Alan Shatter, Family Law (Butterworths 1997)" by n/a
  5. "Geoffrey Shannon, Child Law (2nd edn, Round Hall 2011)" by n/a
  6. "Ursula Kilkelly, Children’s Rights in Ireland: Law, Policy and Practice (Tottel 2008)" by n/a
  7. "Carol Coulter, Family Law in Practice: a study of Cases in the Circuit Court (Clarus Press 2009)" by n/a
  8. "Geoffrey Shannon, Divorce Law and Practice (Thomson Round Hall 2007)" by n/a
  9. "Paul Ward, The Child Care Act 1991 (Round Hall 2005)" by n/a
The above information outlines module LW127: "Family Law" and is valid from 2019 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional GR106: Legal German


Semester 1 and Semester 2 | Credits: 10

This module is available to students on the Bachelor of Corporate Law and the Bachelor of Civil Law programme. The first year course is designed to consolidate and develop existing language skills. Students are introduced to the German legal system.

Learning Outcomes
  1. read and understand texts that deal with contemporary issues such as young people in Germany and Ireland today and multiculturalism.
  2. write about contemporary issues such as young people in Germany and Ireland today and multiculturalism.
  3. describe aspects of the German legal system, including legal training, the organs of state, the legislative process, the Constitution, and the court structure.
  4. describe his/her first year at university, including their subjects, hobbies and accommodation.
  5. reflect upon his/her language learning and explain the advantages of learning German for personal development and for career prospects.
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (40%)
  • Continuous Assessment (40%)
  • Oral, Audio Visual or Practical Assessment (20%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Essential Grammar of German" by Monika Reimann
    Publisher: Hueber
The above information outlines module GR106: "Legal German" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional GR138: Beginners German for B. Corp Law and BCL students


Semester 1 and Semester 2 | Credits: 10

This module aims to equip students with basic general language skills and to provide them with an overview of the German legal system.

Learning Outcomes
  1. understand and use elementary structures of German grammar in oral and written expression.
  2. read, understand and answer questions on short German texts.
  3. describe the first year at university, including subject choice, hobbies and accommodation.
  4. explain some aspects of the German legal system, including legal training in Germany and the organs of state.
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (30%)
  • Continuous Assessment (45%)
  • Oral, Audio Visual or Practical Assessment (25%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Studio d A1: Kurs- und Übungsbuch" by n/a
    Publisher: Cornelson
  2. "Studio d A2: Kurs- und Übungsbuch" by n/a
    Publisher: Cornelson
The above information outlines module GR138: "Beginners German for B. Corp Law and BCL students" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional SH102: Spanish Language I (Beginners)


Semester 1 and Semester 2 | Credits: 10

This ab initio course covers the basic elements of Spanish grammar (including 6 verb tenses) and vocabulary. Activities cover written, oral and aural exercises; class materials include video and audio recordings and texts for study drawn from a wide range of sources. Students are expected to achieve an A2 European Framework of Languages level. A range of oral, aural and written exercises is employed, supplemented by spoken classes and activities in the language laboratory. Written work and class tests are prescribed on a regular basis.
(Language of instruction: Spanish)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand sentences and frequently used expressions related to areas of most immediate relevance (e.g. very basic personal and family information, shopping, local geography, employment).
  2. Communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a simple and direct exchange of information on familiar and routine matters.
  3. Describe in simple terms aspects of their background, immediate environment and matters in areas of immediate need.
  4. Use a basic level of Spanish with basic grammar competency and an average range of vocabulary related to the topics above.
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (30%)
  • Continuous Assessment (40%)
  • Oral, Audio Visual or Practical Assessment (30%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Gramatica de Uso A1-A2" by L. Aragones
    ISBN: 978-846752107.
  2. "Uso Interactivo del Vocabulario A1-B1" by A. Encinar
    ISBN: 978-847711978.
  3. "Socios 1" by M. Gonzalez et al
    ISBN: 978-848443415.
The above information outlines module SH102: "Spanish Language I (Beginners)" and is valid from 2019 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional SH140: Intermediate Spanish Language


Semester 1 and Semester 2 | Credits: 10

This course is open to students who have completed a Higher Leaving Cert assessment in Spanish and obtained a H4 or higher. Students are expected to achieve an A2/B1 European language level. A range of oral, aural and written exercises is employed, supplemented by spoken classes. Written work and class tests are prescribed on a regular basis. Prerequisites: A grade H4 or higher in the Leaving Certificate Honours Spanish examination or equivalent.
(Language of instruction: Spanish)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand the main points of conversation on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school, leisure, etc.
  2. Deal with most situations likely to arise while travelling in an area where the language is spoken.
  3. Produce a simple connected text on topics that are familiar or of personal interest.
  4. Describe experiences and events, dreams, hopes and ambitions and briefly give reasons and explanations for opinions and plans.
  5. Use a basic-intermediate grammar correctly and a good range of vocabulary related to the topics above.
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (30%)
  • Continuous Assessment (40%)
  • Oral, Audio Visual or Practical Assessment (30%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Gramatica de Uso A1 - A2" by L. Aragones
    ISBN: 978-846752107.
  2. "Uso Interactivo del Vocabulario A1-B1" by A. Encinar
    ISBN: 978-847711978.
The above information outlines module SH140: "Intermediate Spanish Language" and is valid from 2019 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional LW109: Legal French


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

Assessments
  • Written Assessment (50%)
  • Continuous Assessment (50%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module LW109: "Legal French" and is valid from 2014 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Further Education

Students who complete the BCL will be well-positioned for legal professional practice courses at the Law Society of Ireland (solicitor) and the Kings Inns (barrister).

Study will also be eligible to qualify to practice law in certain US states, including New York (provided they the Bar Exam) and in England and Wales.

The School of Law offers a range of masters degrees in law (LLMs) for students who wish to enrich their legal education. These include: (i) LLM (General); (ii) LLM in International and Comparative Business Law; (iii) LLM in Public Law; and (iv) LLM in Comparative Disability Law and Policy.

The Irish Centre for Human Rights also offers a range of masters degrees in human rights: (i) LLM in International Human Rights, (ii) LLM in International Criminal Law, (iii) LLM in International Migration and Refugee Law and Policy, and (iv) LLM in Peace Operations, Humanitarian Law and Conflict.

Why Choose This Course?

Career Opportunities

Graduates of the Law (BCL) and Human Rights programme will be well prepared to work in international human rights law, policy or legal practice. Graduates will have the foundation necessary to pursue opportunities with international organisations, United Nations bodies or developmental agencies.

As this is a full undergraduate law degree graduates can also pursue professional qualifications with the Law Society (solicitor) and the Honourable Society of King’s Inns (barrister). The Irish Centre for Human Rights has a global network of alumni working in human rights, providing excellent links and supports for our students.

Who’s Suited to This Course

Learning Outcomes

 

Work Placement

Students will be given the opportunity to engage in work placement in the third year of the programme. The course will offer some international work placements through its partnerships with international non-governmental organisations (NGOs) and other human rights bodies.

Study Abroad

There are exciting study abroad opportunities for students on this course through Erasmus and international exchange programmes. If you choose to study a language, you can use the study abroad option to improve your linguistic skills. You will also have the option to study abroad through English. We have partnership opportunities in Belgium, Holland, Denmark, Hungary, France, Germany, Spain, the USA, China, Australia and Canada.

Related Student Organisations

Course Fees

Fees: EU

€6,817 p.a. 2019/20

Fees: Tuition

€3,593 p.a. 2019/20

Fees: Student Contribution

€3,000 p.a. 2019/20

Fees: Student levy

€224 p.a. 2019/20

Fees: Non EU

€14,650 p.a. 2020/21

EU Fees 2019/20:

- Tuition: may be paid by the Irish Government on your behalf if you qualify for free tuition fees see - free fee initiative.
- Student Contribution: €3,000 - payable by all students but may by paid by SUSI if you apply and are deemed eligible for a means tested SUSI grant.
- Student Levy:  €224 - payable by all students and is not covered by SUSI.

Find out More

Until January 2019 - Dr. John Danaher john.danaher@nuigalway.ie

From January 2019 – Dr. Maureen O’Sullivan Maureen.osullivan@nuigalway.ie


What Our Students Say

Ruth

Ruth Cormican |   Human Rights Attaché to the Permanent Mission of Ireland to

There are great opportunities for law students at NUI Galway. For example, I undertook a summer internship in Suffolk University Law School in Boston working with two criminal justice NGOs: Prisoner Legal Services and the New England Innocence Project. After my degree I was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship to study for an LLM in International Human Rights Law at the University of Notre Dame in the United States.
Tessa Maria

Tessa Maria Lambrich |   Graduate of the Irish Centre for Human Rights

Studying at the Irish Centre for Human Rights is an incredibly enriching experience. I appreciate most that there is room to link academically high level discussions to practical considerations and issues in the field and to contemporary examples, which is very important to me due to my previous experience. Every question is welcome and taken seriously by the staff! The atmosphere between students is so friendly - we come from all over the world and have different educational backgrounds which make discussions interesting and diverse

Downloads

  • Law Prospectus 2018-19

    Law Prospectus 2018-19 PDF (30 KB)

  • QQI / FETAC Pathways Guide

    QQI / FETAC Pathways Guide PDF (45MB)