Entry Points (2017)
401

Course Overview

Engineering is a wide area, covering such fields as civil, mechanics, electronics and computer technology. This course offers you the option of studying engineering in a general way for a year before going on to specialise in your chosen field in year two. It has been designed to help you make your choice about what professional engineering qualification you wish to study for by giving you a year to study the basic concepts and fundamentals of engineering. Therefore, it will help you to make an informed choice about what you wish to specialise in by enabling you to find out where your aptitude and interests lie. Undenominated Engineering will always stand to students as a foundation course. On successful completion of their first year exams, they will be able to transfer to the second year of one of the programmes listed under Course Outline.

Applications and Selections

Who Teaches this Course

Requirements and Assessment

Key Facts

Entry Requirements

Minimum Grade H5 in two subjects and passes in four other subjects at O6/H7 Level in the Leaving Certificate, including Irish, English, Mathematics, a laboratory science subject (i.e. Chemistry, Physics, Biology, Physics with Chemistry (joint) or Agricultural Science) or Technology, and any two other subjects recognised for entry purposes.

Additional Requirements

Students must obtain a minimum of Grade H4 in the Higher Level Leaving Certificate paper in Mathematics or, alternatively, obtain a pass in the Engineering Maths Qualifying Examination (held in the University).

For A-levels: A minimum of Grade C in A-level Mathematics is required
Duration

1 Year (Students then transfer into a denominated programme)

Next start date

September 2018

A Level Grades (2017)

AAA or equivalent combination

Average intake

160-170

Closing Date

Next start date

September 2018

NFQ level

Mode of study

ECTS weighting

Award

CAO

GY401

PAC code

Course Outline

Year 1

  • Engineering Calculus
  • Engineering Mathematical Methods
  • Engineering Mechanics
  • Engineering Chemistry
  • Engineering Physics
  • Fundamentals of Engineering
  • Engineering Graphics
  • Engineering Design
  • Engineering Computing


Year 2

Choose to follow one of the following denominated programmes:
  • Civil Engineering
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Electronic and Computer Engineering
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Computer Science and Information Technology
  • Energy Systems Engineering
  • Project & Construction Management


Year 3

  • Follow chosen course of Engineering

Year 4

  • Follow chosen course of Engineering

Curriculum Information

Curriculum information relates to the current academic year (in most cases).
Course and module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Glossary of Terms

Credits
You must earn a defined number of credits (aka ECTS) to complete each year of your course. You do this by taking all of its required modules as well as the correct number of optional modules to obtain that year's total number of credits.
Module
An examinable portion of a subject or course, for which you attend lectures and/or tutorials and carry out assignments. E.g. Algebra and Calculus could be modules within the subject Mathematics. Each module has a unique module code eg. MA140.
Optional
A module you may choose to study.
Required
A module that you must study if you choose this course (or subject).
Semester
Most courses have 2 semesters (aka terms) per year.

Year 1 (60 Credits)

Required EI140: Fundamentals of Engineering


Semester 1 and Semester 2 | Credits: 10


(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Appreciate the differences and synergies between the main branches of engineering, and the roles and responsibilities of engineers in society.
  2. Understand and apply some basic engineering definitions, quantities and theories to simple problems and case studies.
  3. Appreciate the uses, properties and relative merits of various engineering materials.
  4. Apply skills in (2) and (3) to design and develop simple engineering components and systems with real-world applications.
  5. Develop skills in independent thinking and in teamwork.
  6. Acknowledge the importance of sustainability, health and safety, ethics and regulatory issues in engineering practice.
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (60%)
  • Continuous Assessment (40%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module EI140: "Fundamentals of Engineering" and is valid from 2015 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required PH140: Engineering Physics


Semester 2 | Credits: 5


(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Will be added later
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (60%)
  • Continuous Assessment (30%)
  • Oral, Audio Visual or Practical Assessment (10%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module PH140: "Engineering Physics" and is valid from 2015 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required CH140: Engineering Chemistry


Semester 1 | Credits: 5


(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Apply concepts of matter, atomic theory and the periodic table to predict chemical behaviour of compounds.
  2. Apply the basic reactivities of simple compounds to produce balanced equations for reactions (Acid base, REDOX etc) and do reaction based calculations on these systems
  3. Explain the fundamental chemistry behind the properties of solids, liquids or gases be they covalent, ionic, metal or semiconductor and link the microscopic and macroscopic properties of solids
  4. Describe the fundamentals of chemical thermodynamics including enthalpy, entropy, free-energy and how these relate to the spontaeity of chemical reactions
  5. Discuss the basic processes that effect reaction Kinetics (including catalysis) and be able, for simple systems, to determination of rate and order of reactions
  6. Apply Le Chatelier’s Principle to equilibrium systems and be able to calculate and apply equilibrium constants.
  7. Describe the basic tenants of Electrochemistry based around cells and electrode processes; corrosion and its prevention.
  8. Discuss the reactivities of the basic functional groups in organic chemistry, draw and describe reaction schemes and apply naming conventions
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (80%)
  • Continuous Assessment (20%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module CH140: "Engineering Chemistry" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required EI160: Engineering Graphics


Semester 1 | Credits: 5


(Language of instruction: English)

Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (50%)
  • Department-based Assessment (50%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module EI160: "Engineering Graphics" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required MP120: Engineering Mechanics


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

This is a mathematical methods course that considers the following topics: operations with vectors, 1d kinematics, Newton's laws, friction, energy & work, center of mass.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. perform simple geometrical calculations using vectors, calculate the Cartesian components of vectors, calculate the dot and cross products of vectors and interpret them geometrically;
  2. solve simple one-dimensional problems in kinematics for both uniform and non-uniform acceleration, plot velocity-time diagrams and interpret them;
  3. solve relative velocity problems using vector methods;
  4. calculate the motion of some simple systems by identifying the external forces acting and using Newton’s laws, apply the laws of friction in the solution of problems;
  5. analyse some systems involving sudden impacts using the concepts of linear momentum and impulse, solve direct and oblique collision problems using conservation of momentum and Newton’s experimental law;
  6. solve problems using the principle of work, solve problems using conservation of momentum and energy;
  7. calculate the centre of mass of some standard bodies.
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (67%)
  • Continuous Assessment (33%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module MP120: "Engineering Mechanics" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required MM140: Engineering Mathematical Methods


Semester 2 | Credits: 5


(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. express a problem modelled by a system of linear equations in an appropriate matrix form and solve the resulting system of equations;
  2. use row operations to determine whether or not a system of m linear equations in n unknowns is consistent/has a unique solution /has an infinite number of solutions
  3. perform elementary calculations involving matrices and determinants;
  4. calculate the characteristic polynomial, eigenvalues and corresponding eigenvectors for a 3 x 3 matrix, and diagonalise such a matrix
  5. write complex numbers in modulus/argument form, apply de Moivre’s theorem, derive expressions for the sin/cosine of multiple angles in terms of powers of sin/cosine x, etc
  6. factorise real polynomials into irreducible linear and quadratic terms. Determine the nth roots of unity for small values of n
  7. plot direction fields for first order Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs) and solve separable first order ODEs
  8. solve linear first order ODEs by the integrating factor method
  9. solve linear homogeneous second order ODEs with constant coefficients, solve linear non-homogeneous second order ODEs with constant coefficients by the method of undetermined coefficients and the method of variation of parameters.
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (66%)
  • Continuous Assessment (34%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Modern Engineering Mathematics" by G. James
    Publisher: Prentice Hall
  2. "Advanced Engineering Mathematics" by E. Kreyszig
    Publisher: Wiley
The above information outlines module MM140: "Engineering Mathematical Methods" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required MA140: Engineering Calculus


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

Evaluation of limits; find points of discontinuity of functions; find derivatives, explain rates of change, maxima, minima, inflection points; integration techniques; integration applications; solve verbally stated engineering problems involving integrations technique.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Evaluate and manipulate limits
  2. determine points of discontinuity of a single variable
  3. evaluate and manipulate derivatives of functions of a single variable
  4. tackle verbally stated engineering problems involving rates of change , maxima, minima, inflection points
  5. evaluate integrals of functions of a single variable using substitution, integration by parts and partial fractions
  6. evaluate integrals of functions of a single variable using the logarithm rule or the inverse function rule
  7. calculate areas, volumes of revolution and lengths of curves using integration techniques
  8. solve verbally stated engineering problems involving integration techniques
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (67%)
  • Continuous Assessment (33%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Modern Engineering Mathematics" by Glyn James
    ISBN: 9780132391443.
    Publisher: Pearson Education
The above information outlines module MA140: "Engineering Calculus" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required EI150: Engineering Design


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

Students apply engineering knowledge to fulfil a “design, build and test” project brief covering several engineering disciplines. The engineering knowledge comprises theory and skills acquired in other modules supplemented by lectures on engineering design philosophies and methodologies in this module. The emphasis of the module will be on working in teams in design office, laboratory or workshop environments in a Project Based Learning mode. This module also includes effective technical communication skills for the reporting on the design, build and testing processes.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Analyse existing engineering components and systems
  2. Apply a structured methodology to engineering design problems
  3. Use mathematical, science and engineering theories and skills such as computing and graphics to design individual components and systems comprising multiple components
  4. Specify suitable materials for sustainable product design
  5. Specify a cost-effective and sustainable process for a product design
  6. Develop practical engineering skills such as component/system building and testing and any others that may be relevant
  7. Devise and implement suitable experimental procedures to test and refine individual components and integrated systems and thereby provide a critical assessment of component/system performance
  8. Appreciate the importance of health and safety, ethics and regulatory issues in engineering design
  9. Work effectively with a design team
  10. Communicate all stages of the design and testing processes in written technical reports, presentations and posters
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module EI150: "Engineering Design" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required CT1111: Engineering Computing II


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

This module will introduce students to the basics of software development and programming in a modern procedural programming language. By tackling specific Engineering problems, students will gain experience of designing, developing, testing, and evaluating computer programs. They will develop software for both desktop and embedded computing platforms.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Formulating engineering problems in a logical, structured and efficient fashion, and devise algorithms corresponding to these formulations.
  2. Explain structured programming concepts and how they relate to specific programming languages used in the module.
  3. Design, develop, test, and evaluate programs to perform non-trivial tasks in a modern procedural programming language such as C.
  4. Discuss the structure, operation, and usage of embedded software platform across multiple engineering fields, as well as the consequences of their limitations.
  5. Apply knowledge of Computing to your parallel studies of Engineering Mathematics and Fundamentals of Engineering.
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (50%)
  • Continuous Assessment (50%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "“Practical C Programming”," by Steve Oualline,
    Publisher: O'Reilly Media, Inc.
The above information outlines module CT1111: "Engineering Computing II" and is valid from 2015 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required CT1110: Engineering Computing I


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

This module will provide an introduction to Engineering Computation, beginning with a general overview of computer systems, operating systems and applications. Students will store data and operate on it using a spreadsheet program, and then learn how to move such data into a numerical computing package
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand the underlying structure and operation of a modern computing systems. This includes: modern operating systems and applications.
  2. Distinguish between hardware, software, various programming languages and their properties.
  3. Analyse data, and design and implement basic engineering computations using equations in a spreadsheet package such as Excel.
  4. Design and implement solutions to basic engineering computing problems using a high-level numerical computing environment such as Matlab.
  5. Explain concepts such as Boolean algebra, data representation, and the implications of numerical precision for engineering computations.
  6. Formulate engineering problems in a logical, structured and efficient fashion, and devise algorithms corresponding to these formulations.
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (50%)
  • Continuous Assessment (50%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "MATLAB Programming for Engineers" by Stephen J. Chapman.
The above information outlines module CT1110: "Engineering Computing I" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Further Education

Honours graduates can pursue higher degrees in a wide range of related disciplines.    

Why Choose This Course?

Career Opportunities

Depending on students' choice of engineering discipline, there is a wide range of career opportunities for engineers, in industry, universities, hospitals, medical institutes, government regulatory agencies, research, software companies, financial services, and much more.

Who’s Suited to This Course

Learning Outcomes

 

Work Placement

Study Abroad

Related Student Organisations

Course Fees

Fees: EU

€7,492 p.a. 2017/18

Fees: Tuition

€4,268 p.a. 2017/18

Fees: Student Contribution

€3,000 p.a. 2017/18

Fees: Student levy

€224 p.a. 2017/18

Fees: Non EU

€13,750 p.a. 2017/18
EU Fees 2017/18:
- Tuition: may be paid by the Irish Government on your behalf if you qualify for free tuition fees see - free fee initiative.
- Student Contribution: €3,000 - payable by all students but may by paid by SUSI if you apply and are deemed eligible for a means tested SUSI grant.
- Student Levy:  €224 - payable by all students and is not covered by SUSI.

Find out More

De Eoghan Clifford
T +353 91 492 219
F +353 91 750 558
E eoghan.clifford@nuigalway.ie
www.nuigalway.ie/engineering-informatics/


What Our Students Say

Mary Brigid

Mary Brigid O'Shea |   BE Biomedical Engineering

...I studied Undenominated Engineering and then branched into Biomedical Engineering in second year. I chose the course as I had a huge interest in science and was strong at maths in secondary school. I have an innate interest in how things work. I chose Undenominated Engineering as I was unsure which field of engineering I wanted to pursue. The undenominated course allowed me to try out different subjects from different disciplines so I could make an informed decision. Also, NUI Galway was close to home and offered five month placements for engineering students, an invaluable aid when applying for work...