Thursday, 15 March 2018

‌‌The Centre for Global Women's Studies, School of Political Science and Sociology, hosted its 10th Anniversary Celebration of the MA in Gender, Globalisation and Rights, coinciding with International Women’s Day and the 100th anniversary for women's suffrage in Ireland. Video presentation on MA in Gender Globalisation and Rights by Molly Geoghegan, Current student MA Gnder Globalisation and Rights.     Speakers included: Dr. Anne Byrne, School of Political Science and Sociology Mary Clancy, Centre for Global Women’s Studies, including video and radio Presentations by the students of the European Women’s Studies class of 2018 Dr. Nata Duvvury, Centre Global Women’s Studies                  Dr. Seamus Morrissey, Galway City Partnership  Mary McGill, PhD student and Alumni of MA Gender Globalisation and Rights  Erin Grant, Alumni of MA Gender Globalisation and Rights   Islammiyah Saudique,  Current student MA Gnder Globalisation and Rights Dr. Stacey Scriver, Centre for Global Women’s Studies                             ‌       ‌    

Wednesday, 21 February 2018

The Centre for Global Women's Studies, School of Political Science and Sociology, would like to invite you to the 10th Anniversary Celebration of the MA in Gender, Globalisation and Rights, coinciding with International Women’s Day and the 100th anniversary for women's suffrage in Ireland. Speakers will include former and current students and staff and will feature a student-produced documentary on the ways in which the MA has helped our students to  'press for progress' on gender equality issues. The event is being held from 3-5pm, with a reception (including birthday cake!) to follow, in AM243 lecture theatre, Aras Moyola, on the 9th of March.The event is being held from 3-5pm, with a reception (including birthday cake!) to follow, in AM243 lecture theatre, Aras Moyola, on the 9th of March.   All are welcome but please RSVP for catering purposes to m.geoghegan7@nuigalway.ie       ‌    

Tuesday, 6 February 2018

On 6 February, 1918, the Representation of the People Act extended the parliamentary vote to women. This political right was restricted to women over the age of 30 who met specified property qualifications or who held university degrees. An estimated 8.5 million women were qualified under the terms of the legislation – roughly 40% of the total number of potential women electors. In contrast, men were entitled to vote at age 21. The Act also extended local franchises to women and men alike and addressed war-time disruption to existing residency requirements. The 1918 Act gave partial or restricted rights to women only, reflecting long-entrenched class and gender-informed thinking. The clause, to grant votes to women, was resisted in the House of Lords until January 1918 - right to the end. In light of the long-held fear of the place and the power of the woman elector, the granting of votes to women in 1918, though restricted, was a revolutionary moment in women’s political history. In Ireland, the age of voting for women was lowered to 21 years in 1922 and, in England and post-partition North of Ireland, it was equalised only in 1928. The story of votes for women opens up important opportunities to think about citizenship, democracy, social class and how and why political life is shaped as it is. It is a time to reflect upon the arguments and ideas of those who campaigned to change the law; much of what they wanted to change still remains to be done.   ‌    

Tuesday, 19 December 2017

On Wednesday, December 6 2017, the guided walk on campus with stops to learn more about Gender-Based Violence in Education in Ireland and internationally began and ended  at the Emily Anderson Concert Hall as part of this year’s 16 days activism against gender based violence. The event organised by Global Women’s Studies and the MA in Gender, Globalisation and Rights programme, School of Political Science and Sociology, NUI Galway addresses gender based violence in education and sexual assault and medical intervention. Lindsey Bacigal, MA in Gender, Globalisation and Rights; Dr. Amie Lajoie, School of Political Science and Sociology; Dr. Kieran Kennedy, School of Medicine/Sexual Assault Treatment Unit; and Dr. Nata Duvvury, Global Women's Studies spoke at the event. Ceremonial Lighting of the Quadrangle also took place as part of the ‘Orange the World’ Campaign. There were enlightening addresses by Prof. Niamh Reilly, School of Political Science and Sociology and Prof. Anne Scott, Vice-President of Equality. The event was concluded with a Bake Sale in aid of Galway Rape Crisis Centre and Plan International at Emily Anderson Concert Hall.    

Tuesday, 28 November 2017

'Together We Can End Gender-Based Violence in Education' 16 Days of Activism Campaign Events with Global Women’s Studies, NUI Galway Global Women’s Studies (GWS) and the MA in Gender, Globalisation and Rights programme, School of Political Science and Sociology, NUI Galway, are pleased to present the 2017 programme of events hosted by GWS for the 16 Days of Activism Agaisnt Gender-Based Violence. All events are free and open to all!   Throughout Nov. 25 - Dec 10 Facebook updates on Centre for Global Women's Studies page Twitter updates @GlobalWS_NUIG Nov. 29, 4pm – 5pm, Seminar ‘Sex, Consent and Violence in Irish Universities: Understanding and Tackling Sexual Violence in Education’ Speakers: Dr. Pádraig MacNeela and Elaine Byrnes ENG-2033 Lecture Room 06, Alice Perry Engineering Building, NUI Galway Dec. 6 Events 2-4pm Guided Walk - Understanding Gender-Based Violence in Education. Join us for a guided walk on campus with stops to learn more about Gender-Based Violence in Education in Ireland and internationally. The Guided Walk begins and ends at the Emily Anderson Concert Hall. Talks by: Lindsey Bacigal, MA in Gender, Globalisation and Rights Dr. Amie Lajoie, School of Political Science and Sociology, Dr. Kieran Kennedy, School of Medicine/Sexual Assault Treatment Unit Dr. Nata Duvvury, Global Women's Studies. 4-4:30pm Ceremonial Lighting of the Quadrangle (Emily Anderson Concert Hall) Stay on after the guided walk or join us at 4pm at the Emily Anderson Concert Hall for special addresses by key speakers and the ceremonial lighting of the Quadrangle as part of the ‘Orange the World’ Campaign. Addresses by:  Prof. Niamh Reilly, School of Political Science and Sociology,  Prof. Anne Scott, Vice-President of Equality and Diversity, NUI Galway President, Dr. James Browne. 4:30-5:30pm - Bake Sale (Emily Anderson Concert Hall) Support the Galway Rape Crisis Centre and Plan International by purchasing baked goods following the ceremonial lighting of the ‘Quad’. The 16 Days Campaign of Activism against Gender-Based Violence is an international campaign with participants in over 164 countries and involving more than 3400 organisations. The campaign links November 25th International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women, to December 10th, International Human Rights Day, in order to symbolically connect gender-based violence and human rights and to emphasize that such violence is a human rights violation. The 2017 theme of the 16 Days is: ‘Together We Can End GBV in Education!’  See also RTE Brainstorm Article, ‘Taking action against gender violence, home and away’ For further information please contact: Stacey.scriver@nuigalway.ie      

Thursday, 19 October 2017

Public Lecture: Informality & Labour Markets— Blurring Lines of Formal and Informal Economy November 2 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm Location: Aras Moyola Lecture Hall 2/MY129, NUI Galway Galway, IrelandSpeaker: Prof Jeemol Unni, Amrut Mody School of Management, Ahmedabad University, Ahmedabad Organised by: Centre for Global Women’s Studies Informality & Labour Markets—Blurring Lines of Formal and Informal Economy Co-organised by the Centre for Global Women’s Studies, Gender ARC and the Whitaker Institute, Professor Jeemol Unni of Ahmedabad University, Ahmedabad, will be at NUI Galway and leading a public seminar on November 2. The link between formality and informality in the labour market, especially with the growth of varying types of self-employment, is an issue of long debate. In this talk, recent literature highlighting the integration of labour markets between formal and informal and wage and self-employment will be discussed. Comparative examinations of China and India will be presented to understand the outcomes of this integration in terms of convergence of returns to education in the formal and informal sectors. Additionally, the talk will explore the hot topic of debate and policy formulation in recent times: formalizing the informal economy. Specifically, the issue of the blurring line between formal and informal economies in the new context of the platform, or gig-, economy and how it is a growing challenge in countries across the globe. How to address this challenge will be discussed, drawing on the Indian debate on formalization and providing examples of recent efforts in India to overcome the formal/informal divide. Bio Jeemol Unni is Professor of Economics at Amrut Mody School of Management, Ahmedabad University, Ahmedabad. She was Director at the Institute of Rural Management, Anand (IRMA) and earlier RBI Chair Professor of Economics at IRMA. She holds a PhD in Economics and M.Phil in Applied Economics. She was a post-doctoral Fellow at Economic Growth Center, Yale University. She was an International Labour Organisation Consultant and Senior Advisor to the National Commission for Enterprises in the Unorganised Sector, Government of India. She is a Director of BoG, Women in Informal Employment and Globalising and Organising global advocacy group for informal workers and enterprises, UK. Prof Unni is a specialist in labour economics and is currently working on the changing geographies of labour in urban India and the multiple manifestations of informalisation in the labour market. She also works on issues related to gender and higher education.        

Friday, 29 September 2017

Academic Unit: Funded PhD Scholarship Project Title: Gender Equality in Higher Education Institutes Supervisor:  Dr. Nata Duvvury, Global Women’s Studies, NUI Galway Duration: Funded for 4 years (Structured PhD), full-time. Project description: The Centre for Global for Women’s Studies in collaboration with the Office of the Vice-President for Equality and Diversity is pleased to announce a  4 year Doctoral Fellowship for 2017-18. The focus of the fellowship is gender equality in higher educational institutions. The centrality of gender equality for the growth and sustainability of higher education institution is well recognised by policy makers in the European Commission, national governments and in the education sector. In this policy context, the Doctoral Fellowship is focused on critical analysis to understand the nature of gender equality in educational institutions, identify the challenges and obstacles to advance gender equality and assess the effectiveness of strategies and action plans to realise gender equality. The doctoral fellowship is particularly focused on advancing a monitoring and evaluation system to establish the effectiveness and sustainability of concrete actions currently being implemented by the University structures. The PhD will be a four year structured doctoral programme. Interested candidates should submit a brief proposal outlining the rational, research questions, and research design and methodology, as well as CV and a sample of written work by November 27th, 2017.  Interested candidates are also recommended to upload application for the PhD in Global Women’s Studies via the PAC system.  Selected candidate will be notified by December 10th and it is expected that the student will register January 15th 2018. Stipend:   €14500 (including €500 for travel) plus annual fees. Entry Requirements: The PhD fellowship will be awarded on a competitive basis and applicants will be expected to demonstrate both a strong academic background and aptitude for research. In particular candidates with the following qualifications and skills would Qualifications: Minimum of 2.1 grade (or equivalent) in MA in Sociology, Psychology, Education, Women’s Studies or related discipline Required Skills and experience: Knowledge and experience undertaking Gender Analysis, Quantitative and Qualitative Research, Evaluation Research Methods     Desirable skills and experience: Evidence of capacity of undertaking independent research, Demonstrated capacity to work as part of a team,  and Strong Communication Skills Expected start date:  January 15th, 2018 How to apply: Please send a current CV, indicating your research experience and including the names of two referees, a letter of intent, and a sample of your writing (essay, chapter from dissertation, article, etc.) to Dr. Nata Duvvury via email to nata.duvvury@nuigalway.ie. The letter of intent should be limited to two pages and it should outline:    Reasons for application  Previous training and research experience  Interest in area of research  A brief proposal outline, limited to 3 pages Closing date for applications:  November 27th, 2017        

Tuesday, 4 July 2017

As part of the Path Breaking Women Exhibition, you are warmly invited to "Women in History, Politics and Culture", a day of talks and performance honoring five of the path breaking women of NUI Galway. Date: Friday July 21st Time: 11am-3.30pm Location: Room G011 Hardiman Research Building All are welcome For information and to RSVP please contact: lydia.kelly@nuigalway.ie   ‌

Tuesday, 13 June 2017

Researching gender and political engagement at the European Conference on Politics and Gender, Lausanne, Switzerland, June 8-10th, 2017. Marta Fraile (Universidad Autònoma de Madrid –Instituto de Políticas y Bienes Públicos del CSIC), Irene Sanches Vitore (European University Institute), Stacey Scriver (NUI Galway), Silvia Suteu (University College London), Lilijana Cickaric (Inst. for Social Sciences, Belgrade, Serbia), Ecem Hasircioglu (Université Paris 7 Diderot), and Marlene Gerber (Universität Bern) . ‌‌ Dr Stacey Scriver recently participated at the  6th European Conference on  Politics and Gender (ECPG) was held in Lausanne, Switzerland, June 8th to 10th, 2017. The conference is a bi-annual event organised by the Gender and Politics Standing Group of the European Consortium on Political Research, with membership in the Standing Group exceeding 700 scholars internationally. More than 450 papers were presented during the conference, in addition to a plenary talk by Prof. Shirin M. Rai and roundtables featuring world-leading researchers and academics. For more see: http://www.ecpg.eu/2017-conference.html     ‌

Monday, 12 June 2017

Srinivas Raghavendra, Dept. of Economics at NUI Galway, represented the What Works to Prevent Violence: Economic and Social Costs of VAWG project (led by Dr. Nata Duvvury, Global Women's Studies) at the International Economic Forum of the Americas, in Montreal, Canada on the 13th of June 2017.  THE THE COST OF VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN IN THE WORKPLACE   In collaboration with the International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Worldwide, supply chains reflect the way in which current production takes place, opening job opportunities for millions of young, unskilled, unemployed women but also creating vulnerabilities and, according to recent studies, disturbingly high levels of violence against women in the workplace. How do workplace violence and harassment act as barrier to women’s entry to the labour market and, with what costs for the economy and the productive sphere? Will new industries or new technological advances increase or decrease women’s participation in the workplace of the future? What new areas of research are needed to address more profound and more practical advances in improving the status of women?   ‌

Monday, 12 June 2017

   Dr. Nata Duvvury, PI for Component 3/Director of Global Women's Studies, spoke at the International Conference on Women’s Economic Empowerment held by Asia-Europe Meeting, an inter-governmental platform to promote dialogue between Asia and Europe (http://www.aseminfoboard.org/about ) in Vilinus, May 25-26, 2017. President of Lithuania hosted the 1st ASEM discussion on women’s economic empowerment in the context of the recommendations of the High Level Panel on Women’s Economic Empowerment and Goal number 5 of the SDGS on gender equality. Key speakers included Ministers from Lithuania, India, Japan, Pakistan Romania as well as heads of National Women’s Commissions from China, Vietanm, Malta, and Philippines. Dr. Duvvury spoke in the Session on Economic Benefits of Gender Equality, highlighting the significant macro costs of violence against women. The key takeaway message was that women’s economic empowerment interventions must target reducing vulnerability to partner violence through incorporating gender transformative focused elements in order to reap economic benefits.   

Thursday, 9 March 2017

‌‌‌‌PATH BREAKING WOMEN OF NUI GALWAY: 1912-1922 AND BEYOND As part of the Path Breaking Women Exhibition, you are warmly invited to “Remembering Margaret Heavey”.   With keynote presentation by Dr Pádraic Moran, lecturer in Classics NUI Galway, followed by a roundtable discussion on the many contributions of Margaret Heavey as a classics scholar, educationalist and long-time member of the NUI Galway community.    Date: Wednesday 28th June Time: 11am-1.30pm Location: Room G010 Hardiman Research Building   All are welcome   For information and to RSVP please contact: lydia.kelly@nuigalway.ie    

Tuesday, 25 April 2017

LECTURER BELOW THE BAR POLITICAL SCIENCE AND SOCIOLOGY (WOMEN’S STUDIES)   College Arts, Social Sciences and Celtic Studies School Political Science and Sociology Post Title & Subject Area Lecturer Below the Bar, Women’s Studies Post Duration Permanent Level Below the Bar Contract Type Type B Reports to Head of School   JOB ADVERTISEMENT  Applications are invited for the post of Lecturer (Below the Bar) Women’s Studies in the School of Political Science and Sociology at NUI Galway. The post holder will have primary responsibilities for teaching, assessment, supervision and programme coordination relating to the MA in Gender, Globalisation and Rights; a planned BA in Equality, Diversity and Advocacy, a minor in Gender Studies and related teaching in gender and organisation studies; and supervision of gender-focused PhD research. The Lecturer in Women’s Studies will also contribute to teaching of gender, equality and diversity dimensions of taught programmes delivered in conjunction with other disciplines and Schools, such as the J.E. Cairnes School of Business and Economics. The School is, in particular, interested in developing gender programmes in a work setting. The post requires enthusiastic commitment to the discipline and active contribution to knowledge in the post-holder’s field through publishing and disseminating high quality research outputs. The Centre for Global Women’s Studies offers innovative, interdisciplinary, taught programmes that combine women’s and gender studies with sociology, politics, applied social sciences and other cognate disciplines, as well as coordination with other Schools and Colleges engaged in teaching and research related to gender, equality and diversity. Teaching programmes are research-led and practice-oriented, involving cooperation with a range of external partners and agencies across governmental, non-governmental, community and business sectors. Graduates are equipped for employment in advocacy, communications, policy and research roles and for further study/research in areas related to advancing equality, diversity, development and human rights. The post of Lecturer in Women’s Studies requires active collegiate and community contribution in the School, College and University to bring the benefits of the discipline to the wider university and community.  The Lecturer in Women’s Studies will play a central role in further developing the scope and impact of the teaching, research, and wider contributions of the Centre for Global Women’s Studies in the School, College and University.  The School of Political Science and Sociology is one of the largest academic units in the university, hosting more than 1,000 students. In addition to a growing suite of BA programmes, the School currently offers four taught Master’s programmes and supports a vibrant PhD research community. All Staff in the School are engaged in research and publication in one or more of the following domains, in which events, seminars and conferences are organised each year: Centre for Global Women’s Studies; Governance and Sustainable Development Cluster; Power, Conflict and Ideologies Cluster; UNESCO Child and Family Research Centre and the Social Science Research Centre.  Cooperation and collaboration is encouraged across the School’s research domains and beyond the School with related research institutes (ILAS, Moore Institute, Whitaker Institute) and the Gender ARC research network at NUI Galway.    For informal enquiries, please contact Dr Anne Byrne (Anne.Byrne@nuigalway.ie ) cc Gillian Browne (Gillian.Browne@nuigalway.ie) Additional information on the Discipline is available at: Centre for Global Women's Studies - NUI Galway Salary: €37,230 to €57,782 p.a. (applicable to new entrants effective from January, 2011) (This appointment will be made on the Lecturer Below the Bar scale in line with current Government pay policy) (For pre 1995 public sector entrants in Ireland, the D class Salary rates will apply) Closing date for receipt of applications is 17:00 (Irish Time) on  1st June 2017.  It will not be possible to consider applications received after the closing date. Garda vetting may apply. Appointments will be conditional on work authorisation validation. Further details are available atwww.djei.ie For more information and Application Form please see website:  http://www.nuigalway.ie/about-us/jobs/ Applications should be submitted online. Please note that appointment to posts advertised will be dependent upon University approval, together with the terms of the Employment Control Framework for the higher education sector. National University of Ireland Galway is an equal opportunities employer.    

Friday, 21 April 2017

  The Centre for Global Women's Studies is pleased to announce a number of Clár leader roles will be awared to students in 2017-2018 on a paid basis over the academic year (approx. €500 each). This involves, for example, co-coordination of guest speaker visits and field trips or development of the MA graduate network in collaboration with staff.   Application Process Interested candidates must first complete an application for admission to the MA in MA in Gender, Globalisation and Rights online via the Postgraduate Application Center ( http://www.pac.ie/). Further details on application process will be announced in September.    

Thursday, 20 April 2017

  Join us at  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DdRQeDJr370 to listen to recent seminar on Challenges to Gender Equality, Public Health and Human Rights in the Trump Era: Critical issues for development. The seminar was held in recognition of International Women's Day, hosted by the Gender Study Group of the Development Studies Association of Ireland, in collaboration with MUSSI (Maynooth University Social Science Institute) and the Centre for Global Women's Studies (NUI Galway), and with the support of the Trinity International Development Initiative (TIDI).     Speakers:   Dr. Su-ming Khoo, School of Political Science and Sociology, NUI Galway Dr. Greg Martin, Department of Public Health, Dublin   Chair:  Dr. Stacey Scriver, Global Women's Studies, NUI Galway   Bios: Dr Greg Martin is a medical doctor with an Masters in Public Health and an MBA and is currently working for the Department of Public Health in Dublin. Dr Martin is Editor-in-Chief of the journal Globalization and Health and hosts a Global Health YouTube channel. He also sits on the Board of Trustees of a number of health related NGOs. Dr Martin has worked in leadership roles in the global health space including working as the Head of Science and Research at the World Cancer Research Fund and as the Director of Elimination of Mother to Child Transmission at the Clinton Health Access Initiative.    Dr. Su-ming Khoo is a Lecturer in the School of Political Science and Sociology at NUI Galway and a member of the Gender Advanced Research Consortium. Her research, teaching and publications are focused on human rights, public goods, development alternatives; human development and capability approaches, alternative economics, consumer activism, higher education, internationalization and public scholarship.https://nuigalway.academia.edu/SumingKhoo  

Wednesday, 19 April 2017

  Dr Stacey Scriver, NUI Galway, presented this talk on the dynamics of public and private violence on behalf of the Conflict, Humanitarianism and Security research cluster at the 2017 Whitaker Institute Research Day held on the 6th of April 2017. For further details and presentation slides  'Dynamics of Public and Private VIolence: Situating domestic violence within conflict research' Please see: https://www.slideshare.net/Whitaker_Institute/20170406-dynamics-of-public-and-private-violence   ‌‌

Thursday, 9 March 2017

‌‌‌‌PATH BREAKING WOMEN OF NUI GALWAY: 1912-1922 AND BEYOND With keynote speaker Máire Geoghegan Quinn  Thursday March 9th, 2017 11.00am - 12.30pm Hardiman Library Exhibition Pavilion, NUI Galway Reception to follow - All Welcome Please RSVP: gillian.browne@nuigalway.ie Marking International Women’s Day and History Month, PATH BREAKING WOMEN OF NUI GALWAY is a visual history exhibition that foregrounds 12 women, each a former faculty member or student of NUI Galway, who have made remarkable contributions, across the arts, sciences and political life, in the years around 1916, or subsequently in the  rst decades of Irish independence.  The project was supported by the IRC New Foundations scheme 2015 (Decade of Centenaries), the School of Political Science and Sociology, the Centre for Global Women’s Studies and the Moore Institute for Research in the Humanities and Social Studies, NUI Galway. It is led by Professor Niamh Reilly, with contributing researchers Mary Clancy and Dr Muireann O’Cinneide, in association with the Gender ARC research network and University Women’s Network at NUI Galway. For further details see: www.nuigalway.ie/pathbreakingwomen   ‌  

Wednesday, 8 March 2017

  Violence against women (VAW) is now recognized as a global issue that is prevalent in all societies at all levels of development. Globally the leading form of VAW is intimate partner violence (IPV) with more than 1 in 3 reporting experiencing it in their lifetime (WHO 2013). Despite the recent UN declaration on the new Sustainable Developmental Goals (the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development) incorporating the issue of VAW in the global development policy agenda, there is considerable inertia in policy action. One of the reasons for policy inaction is the lack of translation of the individual specific micro level costs that arise in the incidents of violence to the macroeconomic level. Economists in the What Works to Prevent Violence: Economic and Social Costs of VAWG team at NUI Galway have undertaken to do just this in their forthcoming publication in Feminist Economics (“Estimating the macroeconomic loss due to violence against women: The case of Vietnam”).   The infographic presents the details of key findings and policy implications of this important study.  http://whatworks.co.za/resources/evidence-reviews/item/278-macro-economic-loss-due-to-violence-against-women-infographic-the-case-of-vietnam   ‌  

Wednesday, 8 March 2017

In recognition of International Women's Day, the Gender Study Group of the Development Studies Association of Ireland, in collaboration with MUSSI (Maynooth University Social Science Institute) and the Centre for Global Women's Studies (NUI Galway), and with the support of the Trinity International Development Initiative (TIDI), is hosting the following free event which is open to all to attend:     Challenges to Gender Equality, Public Health and Human Rights in the Trump Era: Critical issues for development.   Location: TRISS seminar room, Room C6.002, 6th Floor, Arts Block, Trinity College Dublin    Time: 1:30-3:30pm.   Speakers:   Dr. Su-ming Khoo, School of Political Science and Sociology, NUI Galway Dr. Greg Martin, Department of Public Health, Dublin   Chair:  Dr. Stacey Scriver, Global Women's Studies, NUI Galway   Bios: Dr Greg Martin is a medical doctor with an Masters in Public Health and an MBA and is currently working for the Department of Public Health in Dublin. Dr Martin is Editor-in-Chief of the journal Globalization and Health and hosts a Global Health YouTube channel. He also sits on the Board of Trustees of a number of health related NGOs. Dr Martin has worked in leadership roles in the global health space including working as the Head of Science and Research at the World Cancer Research Fund and as the Director of Elimination of Mother to Child Transmission at the Clinton Health Access Initiative.    Dr. Su-ming Khoo is a Lecturer in the School of Political Science and Sociology at NUI Galway and a member of the Gender Advanced Research Consortium. Her research, teaching and publications are focused on human rights, public goods, development alternatives; human development and capability approaches, alternative economics, consumer activism, higher education, internationalization and public scholarship.https://nuigalway.academia.edu/SumingKhoo   For further information and to confirm your attendance please contact Stacey Scriver at stacey.scriver@nuigalway.ie   This event will also be accessible via live web-stream. Details will be provided via the Gender Study Group webpage at http://www.dsaireland.org/about/study-group-clusters/gender-study-group.html shortly.

Wednesday, 8 March 2017

FemSoc, in collaboration with the Centre for Global Women's Studies, DanSoc and Film Soc, are hosting a 1 Billion Rising Flash Mob on Tuesday March 7th at 1pm, in the open space to the side of the Arts Millennium Building. 1 Billion Rising seeks to raise awareness and call for an end to violence against women. The largest mass action worldwide, it employs dance as a creative form of protest and resistance. Placing a focus on violence against women, while recognising all forms of gender-based violence, we are calling on women, men and marginalised genders to RISE! There will be a choreographed dance so please come to show your support and dance along, if you would like to.For more information regarding the global campaign, please visit http://www.onebillionrising.org/. For more information on the NUIG event, please visit https://www.facebook.com/events/1811464572453658/ or contact FemSoc at feminist@socs.nuigalway.ie. ‌  

Thursday, 26 May 2016

Last Saturday, November 26th, was the fundraising event Whistles for refugees organized in order to raise donations for a refugee camp in France. The night was filled with interesting talks and lots of music. Amanda Cosgrove and Rachel Apfelbaum, two students from the MA in Gender, Rights and Globalisation, gave a thought provoking presentation in which they discussed gender-based violence in relation to refugees. Amnesty International describes gender-based violence as: “violence committed against a person because of their gender. This includes violence against women and girls but also violence targeted towards individuals on the basis of their real or perceived sexual orientation or gender identity/expression and also men who may be targeted due to discriminatory attitudes about what constitutes masculinity.” Amanda and Rachel discussed gender-based violence of both women and men. In their conclusion they shared some solutions provided by NGOs and the United Nations to fight gender-based violence. The evening was recorded and will soon be posted on the Whistles for refugees Facebook page. The presentation was a part of the 16 Days Campaign of Activism against Gender-Based Violence. The next activity will be Tuesday, November 30th . The documentary “Sex in a Cold Climate” will be screened in conjunction with the NUI Galway Feminist Society. The documentary shows the experiences of several women in the Magdalene Laundries. The entry is free, the screening starts at 3 pm in  the Patrick F. Fottrell Theatre, Arts Millennium building, NUIG campus.   If you want to know more about this topic, follow the Global Women’s Studies on twitter (@GlobalWS_NUIG). They will share ‘facts’ on violence against women drawn from recent research and analysis each day during the 16 Days of Activism. ‌  

Thursday, 26 May 2016

In recognition of the 16 Days Campaign of Activism against Gender-Based Violence, the Centre for Global Women’s Studies  in the School of Political Science and Sociology is hosting a series of activities. All are welcome to participate. 16 Days Campaign Activities with the Centre for Global Women’s Studies *** ‘Gender-based violence in Refugee Camps ‘ Whistles for Refugees Event, hosted by the Banner Theatre Company Presentation by students of the MA in Gender, Globalisation and Rights, Centre for Global Women’s Studies Date: 26th November 2016 Time: 7pm Venue:  Aras na nGael, Dominick St., Galway *** Documentary Screening: Sex in a Cold Climate Documentary screening in conjunction with the NUI Galway Feminist Society, detailing the experiences of several women who spent time in the Magdalene Laundries. Following the screening, there will be a discussion regarding the Magdalene Laundries and what Ireland has done since to address the violations committed. Date: 30th November 2016 Time: 3pm Venue: Patrick F. Fottrell Theatre, Arts Millennium building, NUIG campus Free entry *** Twitter Campaign16 Facts for 16 Days: What you need to know about violence against women now. Throughout the 16 Days, students from the Gender, Globalisation and Rights MA programme, in conjunction with the NUI Galway Team of the What Works to Prevent Violence: Economic and Social Costs of VAWG project will be releasing ‘facts’ on violence against women drawn from recent research and analysis each day fo the 16 Days of Activism. Follow us at: @GlobalWS_NUIG     The 16 Days Campaign of Activism agaist Gender-Based Violence is an international campaign with participants in over 164 countries and involving more than 3400 organisations. The campaign links November 25th, International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women, to December 10th, International Human Rights Day, in order to symbolically connect violence against women and human rights and to emphasize that such violence is a human rights violation.

Thursday, 26 May 2016

Friday the fourth of November was the interdisciplinary conference Before 1916: Robert Lynd and Visions of Ireland to Come at the NUI Galway campus. The Gender ARC of NUI Galway organised the conference together with the Moore Institute. Simultaneously with the conference was an exhibition of publications by Robert Lynd, Tom Kettle, Katherine Tynan, Stephen Gwynn and other contemporary writers on display in the foyer of the James Hardiman Library. Writer and critic Robert Lynd selected in his book Ireland a nation (1919) “voices of the new Ireland” which were expressed by George Russel (AE), Alice Stopford Green, Patrick Pearse, Dora Sigerson and Tom Kettle. These alternative visions and voices of the new Ireland before the 1916 Rising were explored during the conference. ‌In the morning, Margaret O’Callaghan spoke profoundly about Alice Green, Roger Casement and the politics of Irish history before the Rising. After a short break, Bryan Fanning continued with sharing his insights on Patrick Pearce’s ghost frequencies. Subsequently followed the lunch and an entertaining music and performing programme. The final item of the conference was a roundtable. Five members of the Gender ARC individually discussed from an interdisciplinary and gender perspective one of the five “voices of new Ireland”.   ‌‌ This conference was part of the NUI Galway’s 1916 commemoration programme – A Nation Rising. If you are interested to stay informed about upcoming events or additional information, please visit http://www.nuigalway.ie/anationrising/. For more information about the Gender ARC or the Moore Institute you can visit their websites http://www.genderarc.org/ and https://www.nuigalway.ie/mooreinstitute/.

Thursday, 26 May 2016

Despite the recognition that violence against women (VAW) is a global health emergency – one in three women and girls experience violence at least once in their life from the age of 15 – it has not inspired action by governments.   At an individual level, violence immediately affects the health of a woman or girl. The mental and physical health effects can lead to poor earnings, employment instability, and low productivity; they can also result in women being unable to undertake household tasks, like cooking or bringing her children to school, which in turn affects the wellbeing of her children and extended family. These impacts, over a lifetime, reflect a loss of human potential for the individual, her community and the society and economy. My work is on measuring the impacts to prove the suffering reaches much further than the individual victims, survivors and perpetrators. Some of these impacts can be monetised, such as the cost of seeking healthcare for injuries, and we can easily count these as economic costs. However, this is the tip of the iceberg. Capturing the cost of pain, or the long-term impact on capabilities and potential, is far more difficult, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. It is necessary to look at the costs to families and informal networks, to businesses small and large, and at the ways all of these costs multiply and affect societies over time. Studies in the global south demonstrate that violence imposes burdens on the informal systems of family, kinship, and community networks. A recent study in Egypt found that the most significant economic impacts are the loss of unpaid care work, the burden placed on families to provide refuge for the woman/girl, and the costs to a family of providing protection for women in the public space. This shows that the greatest costs of violence against women are absorbed by informal institutions and thus remain invisible to governments and planners, while placing a significant strain on families, communities and societies.           Meanwhile, in countries where women’s labour force participation rates are high, costing studies show that violence primarily influences absenteeism and productivity loss in the workplace. For example, a study I undertook in Vietnam showed the productivity loss to be equivalent to 1.79% of 2011 GDP. A 2014 study in Peru (pdf) on the costs to businesses estimated that overall 70m workdays (equivalent to about 230,000 full-time jobs) were lost in a year due to the impacts of violence on women’s and men’s absenteeism and presenteeism (being late, leaving early, not concentrating). We are currently looking at ways, through the UK’s Department for International Development What Works programme, to generate new data on the scale of the cost of VAW and provide basic benchmark data to monitor effectiveness of efforts to address violence. The global What Works programme is also testing ways of preventing violence as well as measuring cost effectiveness to make the rigorous case for investment priorities in promising interventions. The effectiveness of economic empowerment programmes, poverty reduction programmes and others working to address inequality depend on the efforts to combat VAW, which is at the core of the economic and social challenges of our times. We hope that our evidence will translate into systemic action at national and international levels.

Thursday, 26 May 2016

  Gender ARC at NUI Galway is pleased to invite you to Before 1916: Robert Lynd and Visions of Ireland to Come – an interdisciplinary conference as part of NUI Galway’s 1916 commemoration programme - A Nation Rising.   Organised by Gender ARC at NUI Galway in association with the Moore Institute, this day-long conference will explore alternative visions of Ireland before the 1916 Rising, as expressed by five “Voices of the New Ireland” selected by the writer and critic Robert Lynd in his book Ireland a Nation (1919). The five well-known voices at the time, chosen by Lynd were Easter Rising leader Patrick Pearse, historian Alice Stopford Green, writer and artist George Russell (AE), essayist, constitutionalist nationalist, and women's rights advocate Tom Kettle, and sculptor and poet Dora Sigerson.   9.00am – 9.30am Registration & Tea/coffee   9.30am – 9.45am Welcome   Mary Harris, Nation Rising Coordinator Niamh Reilly, Gender ARC, NUI Galway – Overview of Programme   9.45am – 11.00am KEYNOTE PRESENTATION 1   Title: “Alice Green, Roger Casement and the politics of Irish history before the Rising” Speaker: Margaret O’Callaghan, Political Science, Queens University Belfast Chair: Dan Carey, Moore Institute and English, NUI Galway   11.00am – 11.15am Tea/Coffee break   11.15am – 12.30pm KEYNOTE PRESENTATION 2   Title: “Patrick Pearse’s Ghost Frequencies” Speaker: Bryan Fanning, Social Policy, Social Work, and Social Justice, University College Dublin Chair: Anne Byrne, Political Science and Sociology, NUI Galway   Launch of Bryan Fanning's Irish Adventures in Nation-Building (Manchester 2016)   and "Lynd Exhibit: Writings In The Library", organised by Mary Clancy, researcher and curator and Marie Boran, Special Collections Librarian.     12.30pm – 1.45pm Lunch   1.45pm – 2.30pm MUSIC & PERFORMANCE   Music by: Garry O Briain, Jack Talty, Caitleen Courtney (Musicians) and Alice Hegarty (Singer) Coordinated by: Mary McPartlan (Director, Arts in Action Programme, NUI Galway)   Dramatic readings by students of the Centre for Drama, Theatre and Performance Coordinated by: Miriam Haughton, Centre for Drama Theatre and Performance, NUI Galway   2.30pm – 3.30pm ROUNDTABLE   Title: Lynd’s “Voices of the new Ireland” – Gender ARC members at NUI Galway discuss interdisciplinary and gender perspectives Speakers:   Anne Byrne (Political Science and Sociology) on George Russell (AE) Mary Clancy (Global Women’s Studies/History) on Alice Stopford Green Miriam Haughton (Drama, Theatre and Performance) on Patrick Pearse Muireann O’Cinneide (English) on Dora Sigerson Niamh Reilly (Political Science and Sociology) on Tom Kettle   Chair: Margaret O’Callaghan Respondents: Margaret O’Callaghan and Bryan Fanning   The conference is free and open to the public but places are limited. The programme will commence at 9.30am and finish at 3.45pm (registration starts at 9.00am). To reserve a place, email Gillian Browne at:  gillian.browne@nuigalway.ie or tel. 091 492297.  

Thursday, 26 May 2016

    UN Women costing evidence improves essential services for women experiencing violence in Indonesia, Lao PDR, Timor-Leste and Viet Nam   (from left to right) Dr Nata Duvvury, Senior Lecturer, School of Political Science & Sociology, National University of Ireland, Galway, Anna-Karin Jatfors, Deputy Regional Director of UN Women, and Asha Sharma, Representative from Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Government of Australia launching costing tools for responding to violence against women in Southeast Asia. . Photo: UN Women/Pathumporn Thongking With growing evidence that violence against women is a major drag on national economies, there is new interest in understanding what the costs of appropriate responses are for governments to curtail the short- and long-term consequences and support survivors in their journey for healing and justice. New evidence shows that a minimum level of support services for survivors is more affordable than may have been imagined- and carries gains that go well beyond economic terms. The total cost of the minimum services for Lao PDR to establish and operate services over a three-year time frame is estimated to be approximately USD 13.5 million, equating to 0.25 per cent of GDP. In Timor-Leste, the minimum package would cost approximately USD 6 million over a three-year period, equating to 0.31 per cent of GDP - less than 0.5 per cent of the national budget based on current service utilization. Click here to download publication. The consequences of violence are astounding. It has long-term effects on women’s physical, reproductive and mental health effects, results in social stigma and isolation from family and communities, and prevents girls and women from pursing education and work. Cultures of impunity, where violence is not met with appropriate justice or sanctions, lead to a general acceptance and continuation of violence. In families affected by violence, it is more likely that children who grow up witnessing violence will later be involved in violence. The consequences reach deeply into nearly every sector, with significant impacts on individuals, families, communities, and society at large. Efforts by civil society groups, governments, and UN agencies to eliminate violence against women are on the rise. As violence against women has become more visible, the understanding of the devastating impacts it has, on not only the individual survivors- but also children, families and entire communities and countries, has grown. Photo: UN Women/Pathumporn Thongking The past 10 years have seen growing commitments in Southeast Asia to advance a improved responses to VAW by health, social services, policing, and justice agencies. Despite this, ongoing challenges still exist. The lack of coordination between actors limits a comprehensive response that places survivors at the center of an often complex web of needs and services. Programme allocations are limited to prevent VAW, to provide treatment and care, or to aid reintegration. Reliable and rigorous evidence of the resource requirements for a governments are in short supply. UN Women has been working closely with partners in Asia and the Pacific to better understand the costs of addressing violence against women more fully, including through allocating needed budgets for services for survivors. Services include counselling, health treatment, police response, justice assistance, and practical needs such as shelter and emergency assistance. Recognising these needs, UN Women engaged Dr Nata Duvvury, a leading expert in the area of costing violence against women, in undertaking costing studies in Indonesia, Lao People’s Democratic Republic (Lao PDR) and Timor‑Leste- countries with national legislation and/or national action plans on violence against women. Dr. Duvvury noted, “An important finding is that cost estimates show that the Essential Services Minimum Package is not a substantial burden for governments.” This dispels the myth that for governments to implement a comprehensive response system for survivors of violence against women, it would be too costly to be feasible. This research has shown that improved networks of services for survivors are within reach. The studies resulted in two user-friendly costing tools to estimate resource requirements for comprehensive responses to violence against women. The costing tools, Estimating Resource Requirements for Responding to Violence against Women in Southeast Asia: Synthesis of Findings and Lessons and A Costing Tool for Action: Estimating Resource Requirements for Responding to Violence against Women in Southeast Asia were launched on 2 June in Bangkok. The tools were presented at a results sharing meeting reviewing the successes and lessons drawn from Leveraging Technical Tools, Evidence, and Community Engagement to Advance the Implementation of Laws and Provision of Services to Women Experiencing Violence in South-East Asia, UN Women’s 3-year programme supported by the Australian Government, Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade. Each costing study begins with a review of national laws and policies, in consultation with women’s rights organisations, to understand what the government needs to provide to survivors of violence against women. This review results in a much more comprehensive understanding of what survivors need, and agreements on what survivors need at a minimum - such as crisis hotlines, shelters, counseling, health treatment, and dedicated policing and justice services- often referred to as a minimum package of essential services. Women’s rights activists in governments and civil society have seen positive results in using costing estimates to negotiate budget allocations. For example, UN Women and civil society advocates have used the costing study results to successfully advocate for a 100% increase in budget in Jakarta province from 2011 to 2016, connected to investing in quality of services. Since 2011 when the budget started to increase gradually, the budget has increased to 2 million in 2011, 2.5 million in 2012, and 4 million in 2016, respectively. Photo: UN Women/Pathumporn Thongking Costing estimates have also proved to be successful in Timor-Leste, “We used this costing information for advocacy. We met with the Ministry of Social Solidarity about a proposal we gave them for shelters. At first they refused our budget by more than 70%. So we advocated using the costing study. I was asked to explain why we needed the money. Then they increased the budget to 100% of our request,” Marilia da Silva Alves, from Fokupers NGO reported. Click here to download publication. “The costing study is important to implement the law on VAW. It allows us to know more about services- what is the cost of services across multiple sectors. This has already helped inform budgetary allocations linked to the Minimum Essential Services Package.” Liliana Amaral, EVAW Programme Officer for UN Women in Timor-Leste added. UN Women’s Regional Programme, Leveraging Technical Tools, Evidence and Community Engagement to Advance the Implementation of Laws and Provision of Services to Women Experiencing Violence in South-East Asia, is generously supported by the Australian Government, Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade.

Thursday, 26 May 2016

      Gender ARC and Global Women’s Studies at NUI Galway are pleased to invite you to the following events: …………………………..…………………………..   1916: Home: 2016 Conference   Inter-institutional conference co-sponsored by NUI Galway’s ‘1916: A Nation Rising’ programme, the Centre for Drama, Theatre and Performance, the Centre for Global Women’s Studies, the Moore Institute and the NUI Galway Feminist Society   Date: Friday 7 – Saturday 8 October 2016 Venue: The Hardiman Research Building, G010   …………………………..…………………………..   Women building peace in the Democratic Republic of the Congo   Gender ARC Research Seminar with Salomé Ntububa, Mary Robinson Centre Visiting Scholar   Date: Tuesday 18 October 2016 Time: 4pm – 5pm Venue: The Centre for Global Women’s Studies Building, No 10 Newcastle Road, Seminar Room   …………………………..…………………………..   Before 1916 - Robert Lynd and Visions of Ireland to Come    Gender ARC conference as part of NUI Galway's 1916 commemoration programme - A Nation Rising.       Keynote speakers are Margaret O'Callaghan (QUB) and Bryan Fanning (UCD)   Gender ARC presenters and discussants, Anne Byrne, Caitriona Clear, Mary Clancy, Miriam Haughton, Muireann O'Cinneide and Niamh Reilly   Music from the period (coordinated by Mary McPartlan) and dramatic readings of work by the “five voices” by students from NUI Galway’s Centre for Drama, Theatre and Performance.      Date: Friday 4 November 2016 Time: 10am – 4pm Venue: To be announced   …………………………..…………………………..   Arpilleras: Textile language of testimony, resistance and memory   Public lecture and seminar with Chilean human rights activist and curator of women’s political arpilleras (quilts), Roberta Bacic Co-hosted by Gender ARC, NUI Galway Discipline of Spanish and the Irish Centre for Human Rights, in advance of this year’s 16 Days of Action against Gender Violence     Public Lecture Date: Thursday 17 November 2016 Time: 6pm – 8pm Venue: The Hardiman Research Building, G010   Postgraduate Seminar Date: Friday 18 November Time: 10am – 12pm Venue: The Irish Centre for Human Rights, Seminar Room   …………………………..…………………………..    ‌

Thursday, 26 May 2016

  Dr Nata Duvvury Director of the Centre will be a key speaker at the SAFE Ireland Summit 2016. Prepare to discover some of the world’s most disruptive, change agents – the SAFE Ireland Summit 2016 is just around the corner. On the 14th and 15th November, the SAFE Ireland world will come to life in The Round Room at the Mansion House, Dublin as we gather world thinkers, creators and doers who have so much to contribute to the vision of a safe country. Expect more than 20 fascinating speakers, experience the installations of art, video and music in our Corporate Partner’s SAFE Ireland Spaces, and enjoy exceptional networking with more than 200 like-minded individuals. For more information and registration see: http://safeirelandsummit.ie/summit-host/      ‌

Thursday, 26 May 2016

  With one in three women worldwide experiencing abuse, violence against women is a global epidemic. The economic cost of this violence will be discussed by current and former women Heads of State and Government at the UN Headquarters in New York today. Dr Nata Duvvury, Senior Lecturer and Director of the Centre for Global Women’s Studies at the National University of Ireland (NUI) Galway, will be acting as an expert advisor at the High Level Discussion on Economic Costs of Violence against Women (VAW). Dr Duvvury’s groundbreaking work on the costs of violence against women has gained international recognition, cited by Hilary Clinton, Mary Robinson, World Bank economist Caren Grown, by UN Women, and international donor agencies and cited in numerous journal articles. Speaking ahead of the event, Dr Duvvury said: “Violence against women is a fundamental human rights violation, a priority public health issue and a development issue with significant implications for economic growth. In studies in Australia, UK, or Vietnam where women’s labour force participation rates are high, the costs of violence are reflected in absenteeism and productivity loss. In Vietnam the productivity loss was equivalent to 1.79% of GDP. A study in the Peru on the costs to businesses estimated that overall 70 million workdays were lost in a year due to the impacts of violence on women’s and men’s absenteeism and presenteeism (being late, leaving early, not concentrating, etc.). Both the Vietnam and Peru studies found that intimate partner violence also had an impact on men, which is an important insight to highlight. Policymakers must recognise the ripple effects of violence against women across various sections of society and businesses, to understand that the effects/impacts of VAW do not stop at the factory door but seep into every nook and cranny of the production system. We need commitment from world leaders to invest to prevent and respond to VAW.” The panel was called by The President of the Republic of Lithuania, H.E. Dalia Grybauskaitė, as Chair of the Council of Women World Leaders, to discuss the economic impact of VAW during the High Level Week of the 71st Session of the UN General Assembly in September 2016. In addition to Dr Duvvury, Ms Jurgita Pečiūrienė, Gender Expert at the European Institute for Gender equality, will be presenting expert evidence. The panel includes Heads of State and Government and International Organisations including: the Presidents of the Republic of Chile, Lithuania, Malta, Croatia and the Prime Minister of Namibia; H.E. Dr Margaret Chan, Director-General of the World Health Organization; Rt Hon Patricia Scotland, Secretary-General, The Commonwealth; Ms Sivana Koch-Mehrin, Founder of the Women in Parliaments Global Form; and Ms Laura Liswood, Secretary-General, Council of Women World Leaders. Building on more than 20 years of international engagement and gender-focussed research at the cutting edge of HIV, women’s asset ownership, nutrition and gender based violence, Dr Duvvury has made seminal contributions to the policy discourse on gender, equality, health and empowerment. At the High Level Discussion, Dr Duvvury will be making the argument that violence against women and girls has cumulative impacts over the life-time of individuals undermining individual capability resulting in overall economic loss over time.         ‌

Thursday, 26 May 2016

  Over the course of the year, the Gender Arc research seminar included talks on a diverse cultural, social and historical issues with a focus on gender. Topics addressed included: ‘The Subject of Choice and the Story of Single Motherhood’; ‘Constructing Gender in the French Algerian Context’, ‘What we preserve from the past and what we ignore: some new perspectives on women in Ireland in the 1950s and 60s’, and ‘Irish Women Screenwriters cast in the shadows - Knocknagow (1918) and Guests of the Nation (1935).’ Gender Arc at NUI Galway is a programme of the Centre for Global Women’s studies.  Global Women’s Studies PhD candidate and Gender Arc research associate Amie Lajoie coordinated the speakers’ series. The events give students and NUI Galway staff regular opportunities to contribute to lively discussions on new gender focused research. Dr. Catriona Clear’s book launch, for example, ‘What we preserve from the past and what we ignore: some new perspectives on women in Ireland in the 1950s and 60s’, provided the audience with an fascinating historical and gender analysis of the social and cultural significance of women’s magazines in Ireland, particularly the ‘problem pages’.      ‌

Thursday, 26 May 2016

In March 2016, historian and university faculty member Mary Clancy from The Centre for Global Women’s Studies, along with students from the MA module historical perspectives, helped curate an exhibition which illuminated the past stories of women from the University. Drawing on the library resources, the exhibition aimed to highlight the lives of women graduates since the late 19th century. This was achieved in association with staff of the library, post-graduate student support and translation services. The importance of retelling stories of women from the past, and keeping their memory alive and visible in the university is of particular importance to all involved in women’s and gender studies. Mary Clancy, said of the project, that ‘The exhibition was an important way to situate past effort and to draw upon readily available local materials. Visibility is sometimes a necessary first step in leading to analysis about roles in the past. Exhibitions such as this will help to expand knowledge, to complicate stories and contexts and to raise research questions’. This historical and cultural exhibition was held in the foyer of The James Hardiman Library and was very well received by staff, students and visitors to the university, with future collaborative projects pending.    ‌

Thursday, 26 May 2016

On July 11-14th 2016, a group of students in the MA in Gender, Globalisation and Rights went on a field trip to Geneva, Switzerland organised by Professor Niamh Reilly and Mary Clancy with the support of Gillian Browne.  Geneva was chosen as the site of the Head Quarters of the UN in Europe and home of the UN Human Rights Council. On the trip the students observed the review of Turkey’s women’s rights record by the UN Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women.  They also had the opportunity to meet with María Muñoz Maraver, the Human Rights Programme Director at the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom, and researchers at the Gender Centre of the Graduate Institute, Geneva, Professor Elisabeth Prügl and Dr. Christelle Rigual who spoke about their comparative research on women and peacebuilding. Katie Hennessy, an M.A. student who participated said that, ‘The trip to Geneva was a great way to see how the theory which we had learned during the course of our studies was applied in practice.  For example, the processes taking place in the U.N., including the dialogue during Turkey's review under CEDAW, civil society engagement and field research undertaken by academics in the graduate school’.  These few days in Geneva allowed the students to view human rights in practice, and gave them insight into the professional projects undertaken by organisations, which they may participate in, in their future workplace environments.    ‌

Thursday, 26 May 2016

  On July 1st -2nd, The Centre for Global Women’s Studies and The Mary Robinson Centre co-hosted a major International Symposium to discuss ways and means to advance implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals, with a focus on gender equality and human rights provisions.   The event, held in Ballina, featured keynote presentations by international and national experts including: former President of Ireland Mary Robinson; former head of UNIFEM, Noeleen Heyzer; Paul Gillespie of The Irish Times; Sorley McCaughey of Christian Aid Ireland; Professor Diane Elson of the University of Essex; Geraldine Fraser-Moleketi, Gender Envoy for The African Development Bank; Heather Grady, Vice President, Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors, San Francisco USA; and Monica McWilliams, Professor of Women’s Studies, University of Ulster. The Symposium, attended by an international audience of about 150 delegates has helped to facilitate new connections between like-minded groups so that they can learn from and support each other in moving forward with efforts to implement the SDGs. The event connected NGOs, development practitioners and policy researchers, underlining the importance of linking research to activism. It was a valuable opportunity for the students and staff of Global Women’s Studies and NUI Galway more generally to engage directly in a formative international dialogue on this current and pressing issue.     ‌

Thursday, 26 May 2016

The 25th International Association for Feminist Economics Conference titled ‘Transitions and Transformations in Gender Equality’ was held from June 24-26, 2016 at the National University of Ireland, Galway and was organised by Dr. Nata Duvvury along with the help of volunteers from the M.A. programme. This conference resulted in some of the leading feminist economists from around the world gathering over the course of the three days to attend and speak at various seminars which covered pressing economic issues, through a gendered lens. The long weekend saw some important talks, including two on the Sustainable Development Goals, and what they mean in practice and a further opening and closing plenary which highlighted gender issues in Ireland, and posed questions about the future paths which should be taken for recognising and implementing, feminist economics. The event brought many leading scholars, and advocacy workers together to discuss and debate feminist economics, and how gender is understood within the current economic system, while also paving the way for future feminist economist thinkers.  

Thursday, 26 May 2016

On Friday June 17th, the Inclusive Centenaries Conference took place NUIG, in order to reflect on the ideals of inclusivity and inequality contained in the 1916 proclamation. Funded by the Irish Research Council New Foundations Scheme, the conference was organised by the Centre for Global Women’s Studies, led by Professor Niamh Reilly in partnership with Dr. Ciara Smyth, Law School, and Dr. Charlotte McIvor, Centre for Drama, Theatre and Performance and community partners including the Galway County Council Intercultural Forum and Youth Works Ireland Galway. The event brought together different members of the community, such as those in direct provision, and other new community members in order to create awareness about how different groups are living in Ireland today. Laoise Talty, one of the M.A. students who attended the event, said that, ‘the opening talks were really emotional and difficult to listen to, as they were the reality for people in direct provision’.  In response to the Inclusive Centenaries project, NUI Galway was pleased to launch a new Inclusive Centenaries Scholarship Scheme with support from Galway University Foundation. This scheme targets those leaving secondary school who are from new communities, in order to facilitate their integration into third level education.    

Thursday, 26 May 2016

ANNUAL CONFERENCE, JUNE 24-26 From June 24th to 26th the National University of Ireland, Galway, will host the 25th International Association for Feminist Economics (IAFFE) Annual Conference. Bringing together leading practitioners from the fields of academia, economics and social justice, the conference presents an exciting opportunity to interact with preeminent feminist and heterodox economics scholars and advocates whose work covers a wide range of issues such as gender equality, gender and development, macroeconomic policy, capabilities and well-being. Confirmed speakers include Bina Agarwal, Naila Kabeer, Diane Elson, Gita Sen and Alicia Girón.  The IAFFE is a renowned international association that focuses on advancing feminist inquiry into economic issues. The conference comes at a time of growing economic and environmental instability across the world. In responding to these issues, the IAFFE members are engaged in critical policy discussions on gender equality at both national and international forums, providing a strong voice in critiques of neo-liberal paradigms, and advocating for an alternative vision of economics focused on equality, capabilities and well-being.  Speaking ahead of the event, chief organizer Dr. Nata Duvvury, a senior lecturer and Co-Director of NUI Galway’s Centre for Global Women’s Studies in the School of Political Science and Sociology, said: “.This conference comes at a very critical juncture as the world is grappling with fragile economic recovery, a refugee crisis of unprecendented proportions, growing income inequality and deepening environmental crisis. Scholars, policymakers and activists will explore the ramifications of these challenges for gender equality and social justice as well as consider alternative sustainable solutions through gender aware macroecnomic policies, innovative social arrangements transforming the gendered nature of care work/social reproudction, and  consistent application of human rights to design of programs and policies.”  On Thursday, June 23rd, a preconference workshop will be held by the IAFFE, designed for scholars and activists new to feminist economics. Topics will include feminist economics methodologies, caring labour, diversity in economics, and global perspectives on gender and economics. The workshop will also provide career-building presentations and discussions, such as publishing feminist economics research and developing a media presence. Full details on the conference can be found at: http://www.iaffe.org/2016-annual-conference/

Friday, 3 June 2016

    The Mary Robinson Centre is pleased to welcome its first international visiting scholar, Professor Jane Freedman (June 13-19, 2016) in partnership with the Centre for Global Women’s Studies, NUI Galway. Professor Freedman will be participating in the following events during her visit:     Tuesday 14th June - The Centre for Global Women’s Studies and Gender Arc at NUI Galway will host a book launch of Jane Freedman’s recent book: Gender, Violence and Politics in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (Ashgate, 2015). For more information contact: Amie Lajoie, Gender Arc Research Associate at: a.lajoie1@nuigalway.ie   Friday 17th June – Jane Freedman will speak at the Inclusive Centenaries conference at NUI Galway. Inclusive Centenaries aims to be a space for reflection on the meaning and significance in 2016 of the ideals set out in the 1916 Proclamation of Independence, from the perspective of Ireland’s new communities. In a spirit of dialogue and celebration of Ireland’s diversity in 2016, Inclusive Centenaries will bring together people living in or transitioning out of direct provision – especially women and young people – as well as members of other immigrant and local communities, elected representatives and NUI Galway leaders and decision makers. Inclusive Centenaries is funded by the Irish Research Council. It is organised by the Centre for Global Women’s Studies, the Law School and the Centre for Drama, Theatre and Performance at NUI Galway, in collaboration with The Mary Robinson Centre and community partners: Galway County Council, Galway County Council Intercultural Forum, and Galway City Partnership Intercultural Consortium. For more information contact: Gillian Browne, Centre for Global Women’s Studies at Gillian.browne@nuigalway.ie   Saturday 18th June – The National Museum of Country Life in County Mayo is hosting an event on immigration to Ireland with a focus on women. Professor Freedman will give the keynote address “Women's Experiences in New and Ongoing Refugee Crises.” This event is organised as part of the Museum’s temporary exhibition Migrant Women - Shared Experiences and is open to the public. For more information see: http://www.museum.ie/Country-Life/Events-Projects/Seminar-Immigration-and-Ireland. To book: email educationtph@museum.ie or call the National Museum on 094 9031769.   Jane Freedman is Professor of Politics at Université de Paris 8, where she leads major international research projects on asylum and migration and violence against women. She is also a Specialist in Gender Equality with UNESCO, Paris on issues relating to: Women asylum and migration; Prevention of violence against women; Gender, peace and security; Women’s political participation. Professor Freedman has published extensively in English and French. Her recent books are: Gender, Violence and Politics in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (Ashgate, 2016), Gendering the International Asylum and Refugee Debate (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015, 2nd Edition) and Engaging Men in the Fight against Gender Violence, (Palgrave Macmillan, 2012).   For information on related events at The Mary Robinson Centre, contact Natasha Price at: natasha@maryrobinsoncentre.ie 

Wednesday, 25 May 2016

Registration is now open for The Mary Robinson Centre International Symposium 2016, organised in partnership with NUI Galway’s Centre for Global Women’s Studies. The Symposium will take place in Ballina, Co. Mayo, on 1-2 July. Mary Robinson, former President of Ireland, who currently serves as the UN Secretary-General’s Special Envoy on Climate Change, explains: “The Mary Robinson Centre International Symposium 2016 will bring together in Ballina an outstanding group of sustainable development champions from Ireland and around the world. It will begin a very important international conversation that puts human rights, peace, tackling inequalities, and promoting women’s leadership at the heart of our collective efforts to implement the new UN Sustainable Development Goals by 2030.” In addition to Mary Robinson, keynote speakers and panellists will include: Alicia Bárcena, Executive Secretary of UN Economic and Social Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC) Dr Paul Gillespie, Irish Times columnist and former Foreign Policy Editor Geraldine Fraser-Moleketi, Gender Envoy for the African Development Bank Heather Grady, Vice-President, Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors, San Francisco, USA Peter Power, Executive Director, UNICEF Ireland, former Minister of State for Overseas Development Colm O’Gorman, Executive Director, Amnesty International Ireland Mouna Ghanem, Member of Women’s Advisory Board to UN Envoy on Syria Jacqueline Pitanguy, Founder and Executive Director of CEPIA (a human and civil rights NGO), Brazil Monica McWilliams, Co-founder of the Northern Ireland Women’s Coalition political party Ray Murphy, Acting Director of NUI Galway’s Irish Centre for Human Rights. Niamh Reilly, Co-director of the Centre for Global Women’s Studies at NUI Galway and Academic Advisor to The Mary Robinson Centre, said: “This exciting Symposium opens up global policy discussion and academic research to local communities – for anyone who is interested in issues of development, peace, human rights and equality, it is fantastic opportunity to participate in an agenda-setting discussion.” A reduced registration fee of €75 is available until Tuesday, 31 May, which includes the conference buffet dinner. A full registration fee of €95 applies after this date. A special concession rate of €30 is available to postgraduate students and others subject to eligibility. To register visit www.conference.ie.

Tuesday, 8 March 2016

Gender ARC is pleased to congratulate the recipients of the Gender ARC Seed Fund Awards 2015-2016: The first was awarded to PhD candidates Seán Burke (NUI Galway) and Ann Marie Joyce (IRC Scholar, UL), supported by Dr Eilís Ward (NUI, Galway); and the second to Dr Ciara Breathnach (UL) and Dr Sarah-Anne Buckley (NUI Galway). The Seed Fund Awards are small, externally adjudicated, competitive grants intended to recognise excellence in gender-focused research. The grant uniquely supports joint initiatives, led by at least two academics or two PhD candidates (one from UL and the other NUI Galway). The funding is provided by the NUI Galway-UL Strategic Alliance fund (NUI Galway) and the Gender, Culture and Society Programme (UL).  We are grateful for the time and expertise of this year’s Gender ARC Seed Fund reviewers, Professor Emerita Pat Coughlan (English, UCC) and Professor Sarah Combellick-Bidney, Political Science, Augsburg College, MN, USA. This year’s Award recipients offered well-constructed research proposals for two important initiatives, one in the social science and one in the humanities. The first, coordinated by Seán Burke (School of Sociology and Political Science, NUI Galway) and Ann Marie Joyce (Gender, Culture and Society programme, UL), is for a one-day colloquium entitled ‘Research on the margins? Commercial sex, the researcher and the researched’ sponsored by the Commercial Sex Research Network Ireland (CSRNI). The CSRNI is an all-Ireland interdisciplinary network for researchers critically engaged in researching issues related to commercial sex. The colloquium, taking place on the Wednesday 3 May 2016, features a key-note address from Dr. Lorraine Nencel, (VU University, Amsterdam) entitled: ‘Researching Sex Work: A job like any other?’ in addition to two interactive workshops lead by Dr Eilís Ward and Dr Leigh Ann Sweeney. The event provides a platform for a timely discussion of current policy issues and debates in the Irish and European context, such as the high-profile ‘Turn off the Red Light’ campaign in addition to the potential introduction of the sex purchase ban in the Republic of Ireland and similar legislative statutes in Northern Ireland. As Seán states: “We very grateful to have received this award – the funding has allowed us the opportunity to collaborate with other researchers focused on the area of commercial sex […] the idea was to foster links already forged between CSRNI in addition to inviting international experts to shed new light on the legislative changes that are imminent in the republic of Ireland.” This event is free and all are welcome. For more information, or to reserve a place, contact Seán directly at seandeburca1986@gmail.com.  The second Award went to Dr Ciara Breathnach (History, UL) and Dr Sarah-Anne Buckley (History, NUI Galway). Ciara and Sarah-Anne have been collaborating over the past three years on research exploring lifecycles, gender and the family in historical perspective. The Seed Fund Award supports these efforts by enabling collaboration in research events and conferences in 2016, in Europe and the USA, to underpin the development of bids for further international funding. Their work sheds light on Irish women’s resilience through time, most notably through experiences of transnational migration, and the ability to keep their families together despite great hardship. For more information on Gender ARC, please visit genderarc.org.

Monday, 29 February 2016

On the 29 November 2015, students from the Centre for Global Women’s Studies MA programme travelled from Galway to Ballina, Co. Mayo to participate in a workshop hosted by the new Mary Robinson Centre. The workshop, entitled “Spotlight on Human Rights & the Refugee Crisis in Europe” examined the legal, humanitarian and community response dimensions of an unfolding crisis. The event was planned to coincide with The Mary Robinson Centre’s annual human rights lecture, which was given by Graça Machel directly after the workshop. Machel is a Mozambican politician and humanitarian, is the widow of former South African president Nelson Mandela. The workshop was the first event in an exciting, developing academic programme with The Mary Robinson Centre designed to engage postgraduate students in particular as a target group in building bridges between local communities, the University and influencers of global policy, and between younger and older advocates for social justice, gender equality and human rights. The Centre for Global Women’s Studies liaised with The Mary Robinson Centre workshop organiser to provide substantive guidance on the topic, speakers and the overall approach. The event was a great success and our students did an exemplary job animating and leading discussion on this important theme. They were invited to meet with Mary Robinson and Graça Machel before the Human Rights Lecture, which was covered in national media and our students appeared in national television coverage of the event on news broadcasts the evening of Nov 29.

Saturday, 6 February 2016

On the 5 December 2015, students from the Centre for Global Women’s Studies MA programme co-organised a "High Tea for Hamlin", with local Hamlin volunteer Sarah Bettaney.  The coffee morning aimed to celebrate and raise money to help support ongoing efforts to treat and prevent obstetric fistulas in Ethiopia. The fundraiser took place on the NUI Galway campus in the Life Course Institute (ILAS) and was a huge success and exceeded the 1000 Euro target set! MA student Kathryn Castillo took the lead in promoting and co-coordinating the event, with much valued assistance from Katie Hennessy and Global Women’s Studies staff on the day.  It included a short film depicting the work of the Hamlin Foundation in Ethiopia and a raffle of gifts donated from local Galway businesses, including 37 West, An Tobar Nua, The Lobster Pot Resturant, Easons and Marks & Spencers  All proceeds from the coffee morning went directly to support the invaluable and much needed work of the Hamlin Foundation. Fistula is a child-birth related injury which causes immense but avoidable hardship for many thousands of women each year. Hamlin Fistula Ethiopia is a world-class centre of excellence for treating obstetric fistulas and training doctors to specialise in this surgery. Rehabilitation services such as physiotherapy, counselling and skills training are available to assist patients regain their self-esteem, find meaningful employment and reintegrate to village life.  The ‘High Tea for Hamlin’ fundraiser was also timely in marking the 2015 Annual Campaign of 16 Days of Action to end Gender-Based Violence. 

Monday, 29 February 2016

On the 3 February 2016, Gender ARC supported by the Centre for Global Women’s Studies hosted the first meeting of a new postgraduate reading group in feminist and queer theory. 12 students from various degree programmes and several disciplines took part in this preliminary group meeting, which is open to all postgraduate students in the University. Members of the first meeting group discussed a chapter of Simone de Beauvoir’s famous The Second Sex (1952) and some introductory themes from critical feminist/gender and queer perspectives.  The group is coordinated by third year Global Women’s Studies PhD student Amie Lajoie, who also serves as the current Gender ARC Research Associate. The group will continue meeting every 2-3 weeks to discuss a single specific piece of work from this field of academic inquiry, with the readings being chosen and agreed upon collectively at each meeting for the following session. The overall objective of this group is to facilitate an environment where interested students (with or without prior knowledge of these themes) can come together and discuss certain influential works from a variety of feminist literature in a relaxed, open and friendly atmosphere. This group is on going and anyone and everyone with interest in these subjects is encouraged to take part!  To learn more about the group or to come to the next meeting, email Amie at a.lajoie1@nuigalway.ie