Thursday, 10 October 2019

  An Evening with Sally, Hayden, Award-winning freelance journalist and photographer focused on migration, conflict and humanitarian crises  Venue: AM200, Arts Millennium Building, NUI GalwayDate: Tuesday 12 November 2019Time: 6.15pm  Sally Hayden is an Irish journalist and photographer focused on migration, conflict, and humanitarian crises. She has reported across Europe, Africa, and the Middle East, for outlets including VICE News, BBC, the Washington Post, Newsweek, CNN International, Al Jazeera, the Irish Times, the Thomson Reuters Foundation, RTE, ELLE, Magnum Photos, and many others. She was a first prize winner at the European Migration Media Awards in 2018, for her work on Syrian refugee returns, and won 'foreign correspondent of the year' at the Irish Journalism Awards, for reports from Syria, northeast Nigeria, and Sudan. She was also a finalist for the Amnesty International, One World Media, Frontline Club and Kurt Schork International Journalism Awards, and sat on Transparency International's International Anti-Corruption Award committee.  All welcome!   ****       Website:    www.nuigalway.ie/human_rights/Twitter: https://twitter.com/IrishCentreHRFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/IrishHumanRights  

Thursday, 7 November 2019

  Lunchtime Seminar Karen Hoffman, Attorney at Law Aldea – The People’s Justice Centre ‘Representing immigrant detainees and separated migrant families in the USA’ Date: Friday 15th November 2019 Time:  1pm to 2pm Venue: Seminar Room, Irish Centre for Human Rights, NUI, Galway    Karen Hoffman is a Philadelphia based attorney, with Syrena Law, specialising in the rights of refugees, migrants, detainees, communities and nature. She works with Aldea-The People's Justice Center and the Community Environmental Legal Defense Fund,  representing detained and separated immigrant families in the USA, and communities engaged in disputes relating to rights to water, land, air. She has worked extensively NGOs and pro-bono lawyers, as a lawyer and previously as a freelance journalist,   focusing on human rights and environmental justice in Latin America and the Caribbean. She has lived and worked in Colombia, Mexico, and Brazil, covering indigenous struggles, threatened human rights defenders, and police militarisation, and the rights of migrants and refugees, in Greece and the U.S.   All welcome!    **** Website:    www.nuigalway.ie/human_rights/Twitter: https://twitter.com/IrishCentreHRFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/IrishHumanRights

Thursday, 7 November 2019

  Lunchtime Seminar “African Cinema and Human Rights” Date: Wednesday 13th November 2019 Time: 1pm to 2pmVenue: Seminar Room, Irish Centre for Human Rights, NUI, Galway  A discussion of the relevance and difficulties of realising rights cinema in the context of Africa. Screening extracts of films by Gaston Kaboré, and discussing his work in the creation of the Institute Imagine and the production of a FESPACO Newsreel, Rod Stoneman will pay tribute to the major contribution Kaboré has made to politically committed cinema and screen part of an interview with him, which is published in full in a new book, African Cinema and Human Rights, edited Mette Hjort and Eva Jøholt (Indiana University Press 2019).  Rod Stoneman is an Emeritus Professor at the National University of Ireland, Galway and a Visiting Professor at the Universities of Exeter and the West of England in Bristol. He was the Director of the Huston School of Film & Digital Media, Chief Executive of Bord Scannán na hÉireann / the Irish Film Board and previously a Deputy Commissioning Editor in the Independent Film and Video Department at Channel 4 Television in the United Kingdom. In this role he commissioned and bought and provided production finance for over 50 African feature films. His 1993 article 'African Cinema: Addressee Unknown', has been published in 6 journals and 3 books. He has made a number of documentaries, including Ireland: The Silent Voices, Italy: the Image Business, 12,000 Years of Blindness and The Spindle. He is the author of Chávez: The Revolution Will Not Be Televised, A Case Study of Politics and the Media; Seeing is Believing: The Politics of the Visual and Educating Filmmakers: Past, Present and Future with Duncan Petrie.   All welcome!  **** Website:    www.nuigalway.ie/human_rights/Twitter: https://twitter.com/IrishCentreHRFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/IrishHumanRights

Thursday, 31 October 2019

  The Sexual Politics of Freedom May 22nd & 23rd 2020 Irish Centre for Human Rights, National University of Ireland, Galway Keynote speakers: Prof Ratna Kapur (QMUL) and Prof Linda Martín Alcoff (CUNY) At stake in framing the theme of this conference in terms of ‘the sexual politics of freedom’ as opposed to ‘the politics of sexual freedom’ is to draw our attention to the ways in which the politics of freedom has always been implicated in sexual politics (Bhattacharyya 2008, Butler 2016, Kapur 2018). Such a sexual politics is rooted in the histories of colonialism, secularism, and progress and attuned to a temporality and geography of European "civilization" and liberalism (Mohanty 1988, Spivak 1993). Such a political logic has onto-epistemologically placed limits upon our capacities to imagine a politics of freedom. The hegemonic account of liberal feminism which pervades discourse on human rights, justice and equality, both within and outside the academy, has meant that much of our scholarship and theorising has taken place in the shadow of, and in response to this liberal rendering of feminist politics. Such a fact has meant, we have engaged in a logic of self-sabotage, preventing us from thinking critically about and articulating, on our own terms, new forms of feminist struggle for freedom (Phillips 2019). With this conference, we hope to explore and begin to address this problematique, refusing the questions posed of women who do not conform to the liberal ideal of "female" freedom, as to why they would "subject" themselves to a life within a so-called "patriarchal order." Such an experience is one many of us who research and write about the lives of women living in the non European ‘World’ encounter on a regular basis in explaining and analysing why freedom for these women need not align with gender- and identity-neutral onto-political presuppositions of liberal subjectivity and the hegemonic paradigm of human rights discourse (Alcoff 2006). At stake, still, is the problem of subalterneity, and the location of such women in the place of "disappearance," which Spivak (1988) describes as ‘the violent aporia between subject and object status.’ Taking our lead from the work of Saba Mahmood and Lila Abu-Lughod, we raise the question of the sexual politics of freedom from a non-Kantian conception of ethics as Idea (Colebrook 1998), exploring rather, the ethical lives and practices of women struggling for freedom. Such an approach, inspired by Mahmood (2005/12) and Foucault (1988, 1989) opens up a space for us to understand more clearly how practices – ethical, religious, social, and political – are concerned not simply with the regulation of life, but the constitution of an embodied form of agency and subjectivity which is particular to its own contexts and conceptions of freedom. What can a feminist politics of freedom that centres and begins with the experiences, lives and struggles of women look like (Narayan & Harding 2000)? What would our thinking and research become if the work of post-colonial feminists and the experiences (cf. Alcoff and Potter 1993) of non-European women were not an afterthought (Bhambra 2014), a footnote, a feature of the Undercommons (Moten and Harney 2013), a final lecture to be rushed through before exam preparation? At stake in short, is an invitation to scholars and activists motivated by any of the concerns and provocations raised here, to assemble, accompany one another, think together, and engage in critique concerning the sexual politics of freedom. The Irish Centre for Human Rights, at the National University of Ireland - Galway, invites potential participants from across the disciplinary spectrum to submit papers of 20 minutes duration. Topics and themes which presenters may like to explore in their papers include, but are not limited to the following: •Frames of recognition and apprehension •Feminist Epistemologies •Epistemic injustice •The myth of "neutral objectivity" •Re-thinking the basis of feminist solidarity •Ethics, gender and embodiment •Feminism in and outside of the "teaching machine" •Challenges for contemporary human rights practice •The politics of sexual time •Feminist practice beyond Eurocentrism •Sec(x)ularism and Islamophobia •Theorising subject formation •Refusing subjecthood •Differential allocations of grievability •Feminist conceptions of freedom •Feminist solidarity •Sex, gender and rights Please submit abstracts (approx. 250 words) to sexualpolitics.freedom@gmail.com by the 21st of February 2020. The abstracts should be submitted as a world/pdf attachment, and contain the authors name, institutional affiliation, and a summary of the proposed paper. For further information or queries contact conference organiser Hasret Çetinkaya (h.cetinkaya1@nuigalway.ie) A registration fee for attendance and participation will apply for The Sexual Politics of Freedom Conference. For more details see: https://thesexualpoliticsoffreedom.blogspot.com/p/registration.html          Website:    www.nuigalway.ie/human_rights/Twitter: https://twitter.com/IrishCentreHRFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/IrishHumanRights  

Friday, 25 October 2019

  Lunchtime Seminar  “Jurisdiction And non-States Parties of the International Criminal Court” by Josh Kern  Venue: Seminar Room, Irish Centre for Human Rights, NUI, GalwayDate: Tuesday 5th November 2019Time: 1pm to 2pm  Josh Kern specialises in complex crime cases with an emphasis on international and transnational criminal law. He is registered on both the International Criminal Court’s (ICC’s) and Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia’s List of Assistants to Counsel and is a Member of the American Bar Association’s International Criminal Justice Standards Advisory Group.  Josh has experience as a member of defence teams at the ICC (Kenyatta), ICTY (Prlić), and ECCC (Ieng Sary) and he has appeared in complex extradition cases involving a historical and political dimension in which he has successfully defended extradition requests both as a led junior and as junior alone.  Most recently, through 2018 and into 2019, he has published on the topic of ICC jurisdiction over nationals of non-states parties, as well as on issues relating to the ICC’s Preliminary Examination of the Situation in Palestine. Josh will be speaking on the legal and policy issues which may arise as the ICC’s Chambers address situations which involve the exercise of jurisdiction over nationals of non-State parties absent a Security Council resolution for the first time.          **All Welcome**   Website:    www.nuigalway.ie/human_rights/Twitter: https://twitter.com/IrishCentreHRFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/IrishHumanRights  

Thursday, 24 October 2019

    Lunchtime Seminar "Building a Prosecution Case"Venue: Seminar Room, Irish Centre for Human Rights, NUI, GalwayDate: Wednesday 30th OctoberTime: 12.30pm to 1.30pm   Prof Greg Townsend will give a presentation on "Building a Prosecution Case", detailing the challenges of proving international crimes before international criminal tribunals. He will focus on evidentiary, witness and practical challenges in trials before the ad hoc and hybrid tribunals. After studying at UCLA (B.A.), IUHEI-Université de Genève (D.E.S.), the Fletcher School (M.A.L.D.) and Loyola Law School (J.D.), Gregory Townsend started his legal career as a deputy public defender in Los Angeles.  In 1998, he joined the ICTR and clerked for judge before joining the prosecution, spending more than seven years working on Rwandan genocide cases.  He later became a prosecutor for both the U.N. peacekeeping mission in Kosovo (UNMIK) and ICTY.  He then served as Head of Office for the Special Court for Sierra Leone in The Hague on the trial of Liberian President Charles Taylor.  He joined the Special Tribunal for Lebanon in 2010 as chief legal advisor to the Prosecutor. From 2014 to 2018, he was chief of the Registry’s Court Services Section at the ICTY and IRMCT, overseeing witness protection and court operations. He lectures in International Law at The Hague Univ. and for UCLA School of Law.      **All Welcome**   Website:    www.nuigalway.ie/human_rights/Twitter: https://twitter.com/IrishCentreHRFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/IrishHumanRights  

Tuesday, 15 October 2019

Lunchtime Seminar  “Fear is contagious, poverty is deadly, Ebola is a virus”   by Prof Martin Cormican  Date: Friday 18 October Time: 1.30pm Venue: Seminar room, Irish Centre for Human Rights Prof Martin Cormican, HSE national lead for healthcare-associated infection and antimicrobial resistance, will talk about his experience during the Ebola crisis in West Africa.  Martin graduated from NUI Galway Medical School in 1986. He trained in Ireland, UK and USA and was appointed Professor of Bacteriology at NUI Galway and Consultant Microbiologist in 1999.  He is director of the GUH National Microbiology Reference Laboratory services which include services for Carbapenemase Producing Enterobacteriaceae and was appointed as National Clinical Lead for HCAI and AMR to support and urgent response to the epidemic spread of CPE.  His research interests include antibiotic resistance and food borne infection. With colleagues he established a Centre for Health from Environment at NUI Galway to promote research and advocacy on the central role of the environment in enabling people to live fulfilling and joyful lives.   **All Welcome** Website:    www.nuigalway.ie/human_rights/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/IrishCentreHRFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/IrishHumanRights  

Thursday, 10 October 2019

  Lunchtime Seminar Dr. Caroline Sweeney, University of Limerick, ‘Justice for Syria: Is the International Criminal Court now a Realistic Option?’ Venue: Seminar Room, Irish Centre for Human Rights, NUI Galway Date: Monday 18 November 2019 Syria has been engulfed in a brutal armed conflict for over seven years. Numerous internal and external actors have directly participated in the hostilities, which have been characterised by a blatant disregard for the rules of international law. Despite attracting virulent condemnation, apart from a few prosecutions in European states, there has been widespread impunity for international crimes committed in Syria since 2011. The International Criminal Court (ICC) is arguably the most suitable forum for prosecuting alleged perpetrators. However, the Prosecutor has yet to even open an investigation due primarily to the inability to establish a precondition for the exercise of jurisdiction. This presentation examines if this situation is now likely to change in light of a number of recent and controversial decisions of the Court, namely: (i) Pre-Trial Chamber I’s ruling that the Court may exercise jurisdiction on a territorial basis over the alleged deportation of members of the Rohingya people from Myanmar, a non-state party to the ICC Statute, to Bangladesh, a state party, because an element or part of the alleged crime took place on the territory of a state party; and (ii) Pre-Trial Chamber II’s refusal to authorise an investigation proprio motu into the situation in Afghanistan since May 2003 on the grounds that it would not serve the interests of justice.       Website:    www.nuigalway.ie/human_rights/Twitter: https://twitter.com/IrishCentreHRFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/IrishHumanRights  

Tuesday, 8 October 2019

  Irish Research Council PhD scholarships Three Irish Research Council PhD scholarships have been awarded to Irish Centre for Human Rights incoming, and current PhD students: Keelin Barry (Reception conditions for asylum seekers with disabilities), Noemi Magugliani (Male victims of trafficking and access to protection) and Sahara Nankan (Hardiman PhD Scholar) (Gender, Water and Sanitation rights).    (Pictured here, L to R, Professor Eilionóir Flynn, Professor Siobhán Mullally, Noemi Magugliani, Keelin Barry, Sahara Nankan and Clíona de Bhailís).       Website:    www.nuigalway.ie/human_rights/Twitter: https://twitter.com/IrishCentreHRFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/IrishHumanRights  

Friday, 4 October 2019

    REFUGEE AND MIGRATION LAW SEMINAR SERIES  'The Dream of a Borderless Africa: Migration, Free movement & African Union Law' Date: Thursday 10th October    Time: 3-4pm Seminar Room, Irish Centre for Human Rights, NUI, Galway    About the speaker:  Dr Femi Amao is a Reader in Law at the Sussex Law School. He is the author of African Union Law: The Emergence of a Sui Generis Legal Order (Routledge, 2019) and Corporate Social Responsibility, Human Rights and the Law: Multinational Corporations in Developing Countries (Routledge, 2011). His research has appeared in leading law journals including, Australian Journal of Corporate Law, Journal of African Law, Journal of Business Ethics, Dublin University Law Journal, Australian Journal of Legal Philosophy, Journal of International Economic Law. He runs a database for Nigerian law (www.nlii.org), and is a frequent speaker at national and international conferences. He is the PI for the AHRC funded African Union Law Research project. (http://africanunionlaw.org/)       Website:    www.nuigalway.ie/human_rights/Twitter: https://twitter.com/IrishCentreHRFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/IrishHumanRights  

Monday, 23 September 2019

  The Irish Centre for Human Rights welcomed the inaugural BCL Law and Human Rights 1st years to the centre, with Programme Director Dr Maeve O’Rourke and ICHR Director, Prof Siobhán Mullally.  

Thursday, 19 September 2019

    Biography   Owen Moriba Momoh KaiCombey, a Sierra Leonean, and a law graduate from the University of Liverpool, UK.  He is a first year Hardiman Scholar, pursuing a Structured PhD at the Irish Centre for Human Rights in the College of Business, Public Policy and Law under the supervision of Dr Kathleen Cavanaugh.   PhD Topic   Owen’s current research topic is "Constitutionalism and the Question of the 'Colonial Deficit' in Sub-Saharan Africa: An Examination of Selected African States". His research seeks to investigate the challenges to the development of legal accountability and good governance systems in Africa, using a multidisciplinary approach, and engaging both doctrinal and empirical research methods.          Website:    www.nuigalway.ie/human_rights/Twitter: https://twitter.com/IrishCentreHRFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/IrishHumanRights  

Thursday, 19 September 2019

  The Human Rights Podcast     On 18 September we published the pilot episode of The Human Rights Podcast, a new podcast from the Irish Centre for Human Rights. It is available now on Soundcloud and will shortly be available on Apple Podcast and Stitcher.   The purpose of the podcast is to share the work, ideas and debates that go on here in the ICHR and more broadly in NUI Galway with a wider audience. We look forward to publishing interviews with some of the world-leading academics, policy-makers and practitioners who visit us during the year, and with members of our staff and student community.   In our pilot episode of The Human Rights Podcast, we speak to Professor Donncha O'Connell about Ireland's progress towards a human rights-based approach to policing. Among the many topics we discuss are community policing, state security and access to justice.   This episode is published on the first anniversary of the publication of the Report of the Commission on the Future of Policing, entitled 'The Future of Policing in Ireland'. You can access the Report here: www.policereform.ie/   See Professor Donncha O'Connell's bio here: www.nuigalway.ie/business-public-…donnchaoconnell/   With thanks to Tom Felle, Head of Journalism and Communications at NUI Galway, for the use of the journalism recording studio at NUI Galway.   Producer: Noemi Magugliani ‌‌ 

Friday, 13 September 2019

  Ryan Institute & Irish Centre for Human Rights Climate Justice Lecture Series 2019 - 2020   CLIMATE JUSTICE: WHOSE RESPONSIBILITY IS IT? An Evening with Activists On the occasions of the UN Climate Summit & Global Climate Strike Date: Monday 23 September 2019Time: 6pmVenue:  Aula Maxima (Ground Floor), Quadrangle, NUI, Galway   Speakers will include: Niamh Garvey (Trocaire)Bulelani Mfaco (Movment of Asylum seekers in Ireland)Saoirse McHugh (Green Party)Sadhbh O’Neill (Climate Case Ireland & Stop Climate Chaos)Eddie Mitchell (Save Leitrim & Love Leitrim Campaigns) NUI Galway Students  THIS EVENT IS FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBIC!  Learn more and register here (tiny.cc/climatejustice)  All welcome!   Website:    www.nuigalway.ie/human_rights/Twitter: https://twitter.com/IrishCentreHRFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/IrishHumanRights  

Tuesday, 27 August 2019

   Award of NUI Dr Peter Sutherland Travelling Studentship in European Studies to Niamh Keady-Tabbal.  Congratulations to Niamh, incoming PhD student and Hardiman scholar on the award of this prestigious NUI 4 year Travelling studentship to support her doctoral research under the supervision of Professor Siobhán Mullally. Niamh’s PhD project examines refugee status determination procedures and access to international protection following the EU Turkey deal.    

Monday, 26 August 2019

 Dr Maeve O’Rourke featured in leading Italian daily newspaper, La Repubblica, in a presentation of 100 women, changing the world. The article highlights Dr O’Rourke’s human rights advocacy work calling for justice for survivors of Magdalene Laundries, and engaging with UN Committee Against Torture.   ‌‌ 

Monday, 26 August 2019

 Dr Shane Darcy is presenting on his forthcoming book, To Serve the Enemy (Oxford University Press) at the Centre for International Law, University of Singapore, August 26 2019. The event is co-hosted with the International Law Association.     ‌ 

Friday, 21 June 2019

  Video of the Public Lecture by Fatou Bensouda, ICC Prosecutor 24th Jun 2019 Chief Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court to speak at 20th Anniversary Summer School at NUI Galway  Ms Fatou Bensouda, the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court will deliver a public lecture during this year’s annual Summer School on the International Criminal Court taking place at NUI Galway from 24-28 June 2019. This special event marks the 20th anniversary of this world-renowned Summer School hosted each year by the Irish Centre for Human Rights at the University’s School of Law.  Prosecutor Bensouda will deliver a public lecture at 6pm on Monday 24 June 2019 in the Human Biology Building at NUI Galway. The title of the lecture is “Whither a ruled-based global order and the import of international criminal justice”. This event of jointly hosted by the Irish Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, and will be chaired by Supreme Court judge Peter Charleton.  The International Criminal Court seated in the Hague is the world’s principal court for the prosecution of genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes and aggression. The Prosecutor plays a pivotal role in investigating and prosecuting serious atrocities and has overseen investigations of alleged crimes in countries such as Libya, Mali, Democratic Republic of Congo, Sudan and Georgia. This year’s ICC Summer School will comprise a series of lectures and seminars by leading practitioners and experts on international criminal law examining the law, policy, challenges and achievements of the International Criminal Court since its establishment.    “We are exceptionally honoured to welcome Prosecutor Bensouda to NUI Galway and to the 20th anniversary Summer School”, said Dr. Shane Darcy, Deputy Director of the Irish Centre for Human Rights. “We look forward to gaining her insights on the Court’s role in a rule-based global order and on the challenges currently facing international criminal justice”.   Website:    www.nuigalway.ie/human_rights/Twitter: https://twitter.com/IrishCentreHRFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/IrishHumanRights  

Thursday, 6 June 2019

    Biography Niamh Keady-Tabbal will begin her doctoral research in September 2019 as a Hardiman Scholar under the supervision of Prof Siobhan Mullally. Her research explores how the EU-Turkey Agreement has shaped asylum policy and practice on the Aegean Islands in Greece. It focuses on the exclusionary role played by ‘vulnerability’ assessments by exploring the impact intersecting discourse on humanitarianism and border security have had on access to asylum seeking. After graduating from Trinity College Dublin with a BA in Middle Eastern Studies and French, Niamh worked with a range of NGOs supporting refugees and asylum seekers in camps across Greece. She is currently completing an LLM in International Human Rights Law at the Irish Centre for Human Rights.         Website:    www.nuigalway.ie/human_rights/Twitter: https://twitter.com/IrishCentreHRFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/IrishHumanRights  

Thursday, 6 June 2019

  Biography Parisa Zangeneh is a lawyer and is currently a consultant at the Cornell Center on the Death Penalty Worldwide. She has completed internships in Chambers at the International Criminal Court, the Mechanism for International Criminal Tribunals, the Special Tribunal for Lebanon, the Special Court for Sierra Leone, and the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia.        PhD Topic   The present legal framework of the International Criminal Court (“ICC”) depends on the participation of states for it to function, and it also seeks to place the primary responsibility for prosecutions of international crimes on states, which is also known as the principle of complementarity. However, the Rome Statute, the foundational document of the ICC, does not contain a definition of what constitutes a “state”. In the future, states will inevitably dissolve and re-form themselves, and the ICC will not be able to engage with all actors that are not clearly recognized as states. Also, indigenous groups, which may need to request the ICC’s assistance, do not clearly fall under the presumption of statehood upon which the ICC is based. This research seeks to fill the gaps in our knowledge regarding why and how the ICC has been designed to interact only with states and not with the multitude of actors that may need its assistance.        Website:    www.nuigalway.ie/human_rights/Twitter: https://twitter.com/IrishCentreHRFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/IrishHumanRights  

Wednesday, 5 June 2019

Appointment of UN Special Rapporteur on Trafficking in Persons, Dr Maria Grazia Giammarinaro, as Adjunct Professor of Human Rights, Irish Centre for Human Rights, NUI Galway. We are delighted to announce the appointment of Dr Maria Grazia Giammarinaro, UN Special Rapporteur on Trafficking in Persons, especially women and children, as an Adjunct Professor of Human Rights. This appointment further strengthens the Irish Centre’s engagement with and support for the UN Special Procedures and multilateral system for the protection of human rights. Dr Giammarinaro’s extensive experience at EU, OSCE and UN levels, promoting a human-rights based approach to trafficking in persons, will be of great benefit to our students working in the fields of international migration, refugee protection, peace operations and human rights law, in particular. Commenting on her appointment, Dr Giammarinaro said: “As UN Special Rapporteur on trafficking in persons, especially women and children, I’m aware that the protection of the human rights of its victims requires sustained and joint efforts involving institutions, civil society, media and academia. Trafficking implies severe exploitation, often amounting to slavery and forced labour, and frequently targeting migrants, asylum seekers, refugees, members of minorities, displaced persons, and people fleeing conflict, persecution and discrimination including gender-related discrimination. In many countries governments’ measures to counteract human trafficking have had negative impacts on trafficked persons’ rights. I’m proud and grateful for my appointment as Adjunct Professor at the Irish Centre for Human Rights. This connection gives me the opportunity to share my experience as Special Rapporteur, especially with a view to identifying the need for further reform of international standards, and their implementation. It will also provide an opportunity for exchanges of ideas and discussion on new strategies to combat this serious human rights violation, and to promote the social inclusion of trafficked and exploited persons as the ultimate goal of any legislation and policy.”    Dr. Maria Grazia Giammarinaro has served as a Judge in Italy since 1991. She previously served as a Pre-Trial Judge at the Criminal Court of Rome, and currently serves as a Judge in the Civil Court of Rome. From March 2010 to February 2014 she was the Special Representative and Co-ordinator for Combating Trafficking in Human Beings of the OSCE (Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe). In this position she hosted the Alliance against Trafficking in Persons, a platform for consultation and cooperation including UN Agencies, International Organizations and NGOs. She served from 2006 until 2009 in the European Commission's Directorate-General for Justice, Freedom and Security in Brussels, where she was responsible for combating human trafficking and sexual exploitation of children. In this capacity, she led the drafting of the EU Directive on preventing and combating trafficking in human beings and protecting its victims.

Thursday, 30 May 2019

  New England School of Law Summer Program Every year since 2001, the Irish Centre for Human Rights has hosted a summer programme in international human rights offered by a consortium of universities in the United States and led by the New England School of Law, Boston. As well as providing a venue for the programme, several members of the Centre’s faculty also deliver courses for the programme that are credited towards American Bar Association approved law degrees. Approximately 25 students from United States law schools attended the programme in 2019. The photo shows Prof Ray Murphy with a number students taking the 2019 summer programme at the Irish Centre for Human Rights, School of Law, NUI Galway.     Website:    www.nuigalway.ie/human_rights/Twitter: https://twitter.com/IrishCentreHRFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/IrishHumanRights  

Friday, 10 May 2019

      '2019 Annual PhD symposium, Irish Centre for Human Rights and guests’   Here is a picture of our annual PhD symposium that took place in the Irish Centre for Human Rights on the 29th of April to Friday 3rd April 2019   The names of the external visitors in attendance was Professor Ratna Kapur (QMW / Harvard / Symbiosis, Pune); Professor Noam Lubell (University of Essex); Dr Lars Waldorf (University of Dundee).          

Friday, 26 April 2019

   "Education, the Rights of Linguistic Minorities, and the Irish Language: An International Human Rights Perspective". UN Special Rapporteur on Minority Issues Professor Fernand de Varennes Friday May 3rd, 1.30pm – 3.30pm (Lecture Theatre, Roinn na Gaeilge, NUI Galway Panel discussion: Ronán Ó Domhnaill, An Coimisinéir Teanga |Language Commissioner Prof Tadhg Ó hIfearnáin, Roinn na Gaeilge | Dept of Irish, NUI Galway Dr Rióna Ní Fhrighil, Roinn na Gaeilge | Dept of Irish, NUI Galway  ALL WELCOME!  Twitter: https://twitter.com/IrishCentreHR Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/IrishHumanRights              

Friday, 12 April 2019

  If you missed the  Annual Distinguished Lecture that took place on the Thursday 11th April 2019 in the Aula, you can now see it on the following link:    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3pgdxNoxXlc  Pictured: Professor Fionnuala Ní Aoláin and Professor Siobhán Mullally   Annual Distinguished Lecture Distinguished Lecture ‘Gendering Counter-Terrorism’ Professor Fionnuala Ní Aoláin, UN Special Rapporteur on Counter-Terrorism Chair: Hon Ms Justice Iseult O’Malley, Supreme Court of Ireland Co-hosted with the International Law Association (Irish Branch) April 11th 5pm to 6.30pm,  Aula Maxima, NUI Galway CPD 1.5 points available  Places are limited. Please register in advance at: https://www.eventbrite.ie/e/distinguished-lecture-gendering-counter-terrorism-by-fionnuala-ni-aolain-tickets-59319862305?aff=ebdshpsearchautocomplete Biography Professor Fionnuala D. Ní Aoláin was appointed to the position of UN Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms while countering terrorism, in August 2017. She is a University Regents Professor at the University of Minnesota; holder of the Robina Chair in Law, Public Policy, and Society; and faculty director of the Human Rights Center at the University of Minnesota Law School. She is concurrently a Professor of Law at Queens University Belfast.  Professor Ní Aoláin’s publications include: Law in Times of Crisis (Cambridge University Press); On the Frontlines: Gender, War and the Post-Conflict Process (Oxford University Press, 2011);  Exceptional Courts and Military Commissions in Comparative and Policy Perspective (Cambridge University Press, 2013); Oxford Handbook on Gender and Conflict (2017). Ms. Ní Aoláin was a representative of the prosecutor at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia at domestic war crimes trials in Bosnia (1996-97). In 2003, she was appointed by the Secretary-General of the United Nations as Special Expert on promoting gender equality in times of conflict and peace-making. In 2011, she was appointed as consultant jointly by the Office of the High Commissioner on Human Rights and UN WOMEN to prepare a Study on Reparations for Conflict Related Sexual Violence. In 2015, she was appointed by the International Criminal Court’s Trust Fund for Victims to lead an Expert Review on Reparations to victims in the Court’s first case. In 2000, she was appointed by the Irish Minister of Justice to the Irish Human Rights Commission and served until 2005. She is an elected member of the Executive Committee for the Belfast-based Committee on the Administration of Justice, and is also a member of the Irish Council for Civil Liberties.            

Tuesday, 26 March 2019

  LUNCHTIME SEMINAR Date: Monday 8th April 2019 Time: 1-2 pm Location: Seminar Room, Irish Centre for Human Rights. Dan Sheeran - The challenges of Protection of Civilians in UN Peacekeeping Operations in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). Daniel Sheeran is an LLM graduate from the Human Rights Centre. He currently works for the UN Peacekeeping Mission in DRC (MONUSCO) within the Mission's Joint Operations Centre. Daniel has also worked for the UN in the Central African Republic, Nigeria and most recently in Colombia. He is a former Officer in the Irish Army having served as a peacekeeper in Liberia, Chad and Lebanon.  Daniel will discuss the challenges of Protection of Civilians in UN Peacekeeping, especially in a time of profound cultural and budgetary change with UN peacekeeping. The focus of his talk will be on the UN Peacekeeping Mission in DRC (MONUSCO).   *** All Welcome   Website:    www.nuigalway.ie/human_rights/Twitter: https://twitter.com/IrishCentreHRFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/IrishHumanRights  

Friday, 29 March 2019

    Invitation: Open Day 2019 Date: Tuesday 9 April 2019 Time: 10am – 4pm Location: Irish Centre for Human Rights, Earl’s Island, NUI Galway  On Tuesday 9 April 2019 the Irish Centre for Human Rights will host an Open Day at NUI Galway. If you are interested in visiting the Centre and hearing about the LLM programmes we offer at the Centre, please call in for a coffee, meet our staff and students, and learn more about our teaching, research and advocacy activities. The Irish Centre for Human Rights is currently accepting applications for the following programmes: LLM in International Human Rights Law LLM in International Criminal Law LLM in Peace Operations, Humanitarian Law & Conflict LLM in Migration and Refugee Law & Policy Full details on our programmes are available here: https://www.nuigalway.ie/irish-centre-human-rights/academics/llmprogrammes/  If you are not able to make it in person, feel free to contact us by phone 091-493948, e-mail or on social media.      Website:    www.nuigalway.ie/human_rights/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/IrishCentreHR Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/IrishHumanRights  

Tuesday, 26 March 2019

Distinguished Lecture  ‘Gendering Counter-Terrorism’  Professor Fionnuala Ní Aoláin, UN Special Rapporteur on Counter-Terrorism  Chair: Hon Ms Justice Iseult O’Malley, Supreme Court of Ireland  Co-hosted with the International Law Association (Irish Branch)  April 11th 5pm to 6.30pm,  Aula Maxima, NUI Galway  CPD 1.5 points available  Places are limited. Please register in advance at: https://www.eventbrite.ie/e/distinguished-lecture-gendering-counter-terrorism-by-fionnuala-ni-aolain-tickets-59319862305?aff=ebdshpsearchautocomplete Biography Professor Fionnuala D. Ní Aoláin was appointed to the position of UN Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms while countering terrorism, in August 2017. She is a University Regents Professor at the University of Minnesota; holder of the Robina Chair in Law, Public Policy, and Society; and faculty director of the Human Rights Center at the University of Minnesota Law School. She is concurrently a Professor of Law at Queens University Belfast.  Professor Ní Aoláin’s publications include: Law in Times of Crisis (Cambridge University Press); On the Frontlines: Gender, War and the Post-Conflict Process (Oxford University Press, 2011);  Exceptional Courts and Military Commissions in Comparative and Policy Perspective (Cambridge University Press, 2013); Oxford Handbook on Gender and Conflict (2017). Ms. Ní Aoláin was a representative of the prosecutor at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia at domestic war crimes trials in Bosnia (1996-97). In 2003, she was appointed by the Secretary-General of the United Nations as Special Expert on promoting gender equality in times of conflict and peace-making. In 2011, she was appointed as consultant jointly by the Office of the High Commissioner on Human Rights and UN WOMEN to prepare a Study on Reparations for Conflict Related Sexual Violence. In 2015, she was appointed by the International Criminal Court’s Trust Fund for Victims to lead an Expert Review on Reparations to victims in the Court’s first case. In 2000, she was appointed by the Irish Minister of Justice to the Irish Human Rights Commission and served until 2005. She is an elected member of the Executive Committee for the Belfast-based Committee on the Administration of Justice, and is also a member of the Irish Council for Civil Liberties.            

Thursday, 4 April 2019

   Dr Maeve O’Rourke appointed to Lectureship in Human Rights Law Dr Maeve O’Rourke has taken up a new position as Lecturer in Human Rights Law, and Programme Director of the Bachelor of Law and Human Rights degree programme. Dr O’Rourke will also lead the development of a new International Human Rights Law clinic and clinical training on our LLM programmes.  Dr O’Rourke said: “It is a privilege for me to join this internationally renowned centre of academic excellence and commitment to justice. I’m eager to learn from colleagues and to work with them and our students to strengthen understanding and protection of human rights in Ireland and around the world. I am particularly looking forward to welcoming our first cohort of BCL Law & Human Rights students this September, and to establishing a Human Rights Law Clinic here at the Centre.”  Welcoming Dr O’Rourke’s appointment, Professor Siobhán Mullally, Director of the Irish Centre for Human Rights, said:  “We are delighted to welcome Dr Maeve O’Rourke to the Irish Centre for Human Rights, School of Law here at NUI Galway. Dr O’Rourke is a renowned advocate and teacher, and the recipient of many honours and awards for her outstanding contribution to human rights research and practice. We are particularly excited to be launching the new undergraduate BCL Law and Human Rights programme, under Dr O’Rourke’s leadership, and to the development of the Human Rights Law clinic at the Irish Centre for Human Rights. Dr O’Rourke’s appointment continues to build on our commitment to teaching and advocacy in the field of human rights, and to world-class research that contributes to law and policy reform.” Dr O’Rourke’s research interests lie primarily in the development of the rule against torture and ill-treatment in international human rights law, human rights protections for older people, access to justice and redress for systemic and so-called ‘historical’ human rights abuses, and human rights research and advocacy methods. She was awarded her PhD (entitled ‘Older People, Dignity and Human Rights: Towards the Development of the Rule against Torture and Ill-treatment in International Human Rights Law’) in 2018 from Birmingham Law School where she was supervised by Professor Fiona de Londras and Professor Rosie Harding. From October 2017 to January 2019, Dr O’Rourke held the position of Senior Research and Policy Officer at the Irish Council for Civil Liberties. Maeve is a barrister at 33 Bedford Row, London, and she is registered as an Attorney at Law in New York State. She has previously practised family law, and between 2013 and 2014 she worked with Leigh Day solicitors representing 15,000 claimants from Bodo, Rivers State, Nigeria in their claim against Shell Petroleum Development Company in the Technology and Construction Division of the English High Court. Since 2010 Dr O’Rourke has provided pro bono assistance to the voluntary advocacy groups, ‘Justice for Magdalenes’ and ‘Adoption Rights Alliance’, and she is currently a member of the research group, ‘Justice for Magdalenes Research’ (www.jfmresearch.com). She is co-director of the evidence-gathering initiative with Hogan Lovells LLP, ‘Clann: Ireland’s Unmarried Mothers and their Children: Gathering the Data’ (www.clannproject.org). Maeve’s legal research and public advocacy concerning Ireland’s Magdalene Laundries and the forced separation of unmarried families in Ireland during the 20th century has received international and national recognition; awards include UK Family Law Pro Bono Lawyer of the Year (2013), Ireland Fund of Great Britain ‘Forgotten Irish’ Award (2013), University College Dublin Inaugural Alumni Achievement Award in Law (2014), Ireland/United States Alumni Association Inaugural Emerging Leader Award (2015), Lord Mayor of Dublin Award (2016), and PILnet Local Pro Bono Impact Award (2018). Dr O’Rourke has previously worked as a Consultant to the United Nations Special Rapporteur on Torture, Professor Nils Melzer; Harvard Law School Global Human Rights Fellow at Equality Now; and researcher at the Harvard Law School Human Rights Program, the University of Minnesota Law School Human Rights Center and Just for Kids Law (UK).    

Thursday, 21 February 2019

  Annual Galway Business and Human Rights Symposium “Non-Financial Reporting:  Implications for business and human rights in Ireland” A symposium organised by the Irish Centre for Human Rights  Tuesday 2 April 2019 11am - 3pm, Room THB G011, Hardiman Building National University of Ireland Galway * * Registration closes on 28 March 2019 * * The Irish Centre for Human Rights at the National University of Ireland Galway will host a half-day symposium on Tuesday 2 April 2019 exploring the growing role of non-financial reporting in the context of international and national efforts aimed at advancing business respect for human rights. This event will explore recent international developments in this area and consider the implications in an Irish context of the EU laws requiring non-financial and diversity disclosures by certain business enterprises. The symposium will bring together a number of legal and policy experts, as well as practitioners. Register at www.conference.ie  Registration rates (including a light lunch): ·       Professionals (3 CPD points available):                   €50 ·       University/civil society/unwaged:                            No charge    

Monday, 25 March 2019

Lunchtime Seminar Series  Human Rights and Development: Preventing Crimes Against Humanity in Myanmar  Dr. Daniel Aguirre Senior Lecturer, University of Roehampton London  Wednesday 27 March, 1-2pm Seminar Room, Irish Centre for Human Rights The world was shocked by the crimes against humanity committed against the Rohingya in Myanmar. The country's transition to 'open for business' had been promoted as the regional good news story. Yet human rights activists had were not surprised and had adopted a more 'gloomy' outlook: the transition was incomplete, basic human rights laws and protection mechanisms were not in place and violations continued with impunity. Legal and institutional reform were inadequate and into this regulatory gap flowed billions of dollars in investment.  Despite the Rule of Law being put forward in the Sustainable Development Agenda, the international community insisted on legal protections for investor's interests while pursuing a policy of soft 'engagement' on human rights. The results showed that a failure to reform institutions, law and accountability mechanisms in transition results in a breakdown of the rule of law, and fosters a culture of impunity, emboldening human rights violators. This sets the stage for crimes against humanity. More must be done to prevent international crimes by ensuring that the rule of law and human rights are central to development.   Website:    www.nuigalway.ie/human_rights/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/IrishCentreHR Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/IrishHumanRights

Friday, 22 March 2019

The Irish Centre for Human Rights launched the on Thursday, 28 February, 2019.  Ms Gráinne O'Hara, Head of the Department of International Protection at the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, gave the keynote address reflecting  on her experience of working with refugees in Mexico, the former Yugoslavia, Burundi, Sudan (Darfur), the US, Syria, Afghanistan and Iraq.  Ms O’Hara also spoke to the need for highly qualified postgraduates in the area of migration and forced displacement, both at the policy level and in the field: “At a time when human mobility, and forced displacement in particular, is to the forefront of so many highly charged political discussions, the value of academic discipline on the distinct but related issues of migration and refugee flight comes into its own. The LLM in International Migration and Refugee Law and Policy on offer from the Irish Centre for Human Rights at NUI is a case in point. A clear understanding of the relevant legal frameworks, coupled with evidence-based analysis on field realities, is critical to good policy making.” The LL.M in International Migration and Refugee Law will commence in September, 2019 and is the only course of its kind on offer in an Irish university.  The Irish Centre for Human Rights, as one of the world’s premier university-based institutions for the study and promotion of human rights, is uniquely placed to deliver this course.  The programme enables the development of expertise in international, regional and domestic law, policy and practice in the areas of migration, human trafficking and refugee law.  There is the opportunity to combine the study of international migration with specialised courses in international humanitarian law and peace operations, gender and law, child rights, and international criminal law.The core-teaching programme is supplemented with an exciting programme of guest seminars, workshops and conferences engaging with leading experts and practitioners in the field of refugee protection, human trafficking, international migration, human rights law and public policy.

Tuesday, 26 March 2019

  LUNCHTIME SEMINAR ‘Good Relations: A Rights-Based Approach to Kinship Care in Liverpool’ By Dr. Aoife Daly Date: 29th March 2019 Time: 1pm -2pm Venue: Seminar room, Irish Centre for Human Rights Kinship carers – family or friends who take on the care of children who cannot be cared for by parents – are the unsung heroes of the child care system in England and Wales. They are usually grandparents, frequently have health problems, and often live in poverty. They step in to care for children at a time of crisis. Yet they are primarily left by the state without financial or other support to provide this particularly vulnerable group of kinship children with what they need. Relevant rules are complex and unclear, and kinship carers are often unaware of their legal position. This seminar outlines how a project in Liverpool aimed to frame kinship care as a rights issue, using the framework of rights and law to progress understanding amongst authorities of the experiences and needs of kinship families, and to assist them in accessing assistance and entitlements. Professionals working with kinship families were asked their views on and experiences of kinship care as a rights issue. It is concluded that their views on rights are complex and often subtle, with varied understandings as to the meaning of rights and various degrees of ambivalence as to their legitimacy. This is considered in light of Klug’s framework of human rights as part law, part philosophy, and part political movement. It is finally concluded that human rights should be presented to professionals as both a journey and an end point towards and for better practice and outcomes.  Dr Aoife Daly is Senior Lecturer at the School of Law, University of Liverpool. She is also Deputy Director of the European Children’s Rights Unit which seeks to progress children’s rights through research. She recently published Children, Autonomy and the Courts: Beyond the Right to be Heard with Brill Nijhoff (2018).   Website:    www.nuigalway.ie/human_rights/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/IrishCentreHR Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/IrishHumanRights

Wednesday, 13 March 2019

“We tortured some folks”: The Legacy of US torture Dr Michelle Farrell Senior Lecturer in Law at the University of Liverpool  Irish Centre for Human Rights, Seminar Room Wednesday 20 March 2019, 1-2pm  Co-hosted with the Whitaker Institute Conflict, Humanitarianism and Security Cluster How do governments talk about torture - whether to deny having tortured, to justify a practice of torture, or to admit to a history of torture – without sounding tyrannical? In 2014, then President Barack Obama admitted to a history of torture.  He did not use rhetorical techniques of denial, justification and qualification, the kind of techniques so commonly employed by governments in handling allegations of torture; indeed, techniques that were deployed as a matter of course during the Bush administration. “We tortured some folk”, said Obama, earnestly, candidly, and calm as you like. There was no effort to euphemise, no use of the passive voice, no shifting of blame on to any particular person, agency, or a few bad apples.   Obama used these four little words in August 2014, at a White House press conference, in pre-emption of the publication of the damning Senate Intelligence Committee Report on Torture. The sentence is undoubtedly jarring. He admits to the commission of an international crime. He describes the victims, quite colloquially, in friendly terms, as 'folks'. He says 'we' did it.  In this paper, I will examine this admission with a view to critiquing the US attitude to, and handling of, its post 11 September policy of torture. I will also use Obama’s words as a vehicle to explore the practice of torture beyond the strictures of the human rights and accountability frameworks, that dominate the discussion. In fact, I will use Obama's words to try to enrich our understanding of the act or practice of torture. These words can be interpreted to disclose, I argue, first, torture in all of its liberal democratic glory, second, torture as part of a civilising mission and, finally, torture as a sacrificial practice revealing a political theology of torture.      

Monday, 11 March 2019

Lunchtime Seminar Series   Human Rights & Exonerations: Is Innocence Enough? By Dr. Brian Farrell  Lecturer in Law & Human Rights, University of Iowa College of Law and President of the Innocence Project of Iowa. Friday 15 March, 1-2pm Seminar Room, Irish Centre for Human Rights  In many domestic legal systems, procedural barriers can preclude a wrongfully convicted person from being exonerated despite the existence of evidence of innocence. In 2018, the Iowa Supreme Court joined a small minority of US jurisdictions in recognizing a freestanding claim of “actual innocence” (in a case in which Dr. Farrell was involved as an amicus curiae). Building on recent scholarship identifying an emerging international consensus on the right to claim innocence, this presentation will examine whether procedural barriers can be reconciled with human rights law, or if the incarceration of a factually innocent person is inherently contrary to international human rights norms.       

Thursday, 28 February 2019

  Lunchtime seminar “Unpacking the Use of Amnesties in Conflict and Peace” by Professor Louise Mallinder, Queen’s University Belfast Date: 11th March 2019 Time:  1-2pm Venue: Seminar Room, Irish Centre for Human Rights, NUI, Galway  Prof Mallinder will present the findings of her new Amnesties, Conflict, and Peace Agreement (ACPA) dataset, which has been developed as part as part of the Political Settlements Research Project. The dataset contains large-scale comparative data on trends in state practice on conflict and peace-related amnesties. Using this data, she will explore when and how amnesties are used during conflict and transitions towards peace. In particular, she will examine how the context in which amnesties are adopted can shape decisions on whether to limit the material or personal scope of amnesties or to attach conditions to the grant of amnesty; or on their range of legal effects. She will argue that these aspects of amnesty design can have significant implications for the extent to which amnesty can contribute to inclusive political settlements or conversely to excluding some individuals or groups from the post-conflict political contract.                                                                                                 All welcome!   ****      Website:    www.nuigalway.ie/human_rights/Twitter: https://twitter.com/IrishCentreHRFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/IrishHumanRights

Monday, 25 February 2019

   LUNCHTIME SEMINAR  "From Administration to Law and Rights? Asylum Seekers & Direct Provision" by By Dr Liam Thornton, Sutherland School of Law, University College Dublin  Date: 27th February 2019 Time: 1pm -2pm Venue: Seminar room, Irish Centre for Human Rights Bio Dr Liam Thornton is a lecturer in law the School of Law, UCD, where he teaches undergraduate and postgraduate courses on a range of subjects including refugee protection, human rights law and social inclusion. Liam has a strong interest in social justice and law, and researches in areas relating to immigration law, social security law, European law and human rights law. He has published widely in these fields, and has also carried out tendered research for the Law Society of Ireland, the Irish Human Rights Commission, the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission and the Odysseus Network/European Commission, as well as pro-bono research for legal practitioners and leading national non-governmental organisations. Prior to taking up his position in UCD, Liam was Research and Policy Officer in the Irish Human Rights Commission (2008-9) and a lecturer in law in University of Ulster (2009-2012).

Wednesday, 20 February 2019

The Irish Centre for Human Rights is delighted to announce the appointment of Professor Fernand de Varennes, UN Special Rapporteur on Minority Issues, as an Adjunct Professor of Human Rights Law. Professor de Varennes was appointed United Nations Special Rapporteur on Minority Issues by the UN Human Rights Council and assumed his functions on 1 August 2017. Fernand de Varennes’ work and commitment focusses on the human rights of minorities, as well as the prevention of ethnic conflicts, the rights of migrants, the relationship between ethnicity, human rights and democracies, and the use of federalism and other forms of autonomy arrangements. As part of his UN mandate, he recently completed a country visits to Spain and has continued to focus on the international law questions relating to statelessness and citizenship rights of minorities. Director of the Irish Centre for Human Rights, Professor Siobhán Mullally welcomed Professor de Varennes’ appointment: “The Centre has a long tradition of research, teaching and advocacy on the rights of minorities. Professor de Varennes’ appointment builds on this tradition, giving students and staff the opportunity to work with and to learn from one of the world’s leading experts on this subject. Through this new collaboration, we will further expand the opportunities for our students to gain hands-on, ‘real world’ experience of international human rights law practice. The UN Special Rapporteur’s focus on Language Rights is of particular significance in Ireland, and to the work of the Language Commissioner, located in Spiddal, Co. Galway. The Special Rapporteur’s work on statelessness, as a global phenomenon affecting migrant communities, will be of great interest to students on our new LLM programme in International Migration and Refugee Law and Policy.”   Commenting on his new appointment to the Irish Centre for Human Rights, Professor de Varennes said: “The international human rights system is a bulwark against injustice and instability. I'm looking forward to working with the staff and students at the Irish Centre for Human Rights to better understand and help strengthen, in Europe and elsewhere, this essential dimension of the global community in which we now live." Professor de Varennes will speak at a series of events at NUI Galway, April 29-May 1st, including a joint event on Language Rights, with An Comisinéir Teanga (the Language Commissioner), and a seminar on Minority Rights and Ethnic Conflict. For further information, please contact the Irish Centre for Human Rights, humanrights@nuigalway.ie Information on the work of the Un Special Rapporteur on Minority Issues is available at: https://www.ohchr.org/EN/Issues/Minorities/SRMinorities/Pages/SRminorityissuesIndex.aspx  

Wednesday, 20 February 2019

  Invitation to the Launch of the new LLM in International Migration and Refugee Law and Policy  Thursday February 28th at 6pm, Staff Club, The Quadrangle, NUI Galway Guest speakers: Gráinne O’Hara, Director of International Protection, UN High Commissioner for Refugees  Respondent: Hilkka Becker, (Solicitor) Chairperson, International Protection Appeals Tribunal (Ireland)    

Friday, 15 February 2019

The Irish Centre for Human Rights is delighted to have been awarded a four year contract to work with the EU Fundamental Rights Agency, in the EU wide collaborative research network -  FRANET.   FRANET is a mulitidisciplinary research network of leading experts on EU fundamental rights law and policy. The network supports the work of the Fundamental Rights Agency through expert research and data analysis on fundamental rights across the European Union.  Commenting on the award of the project, Director of the Irish Centre for Human Rights, Professor Siobhán Mullally, stated:  “At this critical time in the protection of fundamental rights in the European Union, the work of collaborative networks such as FRANET is more critical than ever. Through in depth analysis of legislative and policy developments, and data analysis, we can support the work of the Fundamental Rights Agency in providing expert advice to the institutions of the EU and the Member States, helping to ensure that the fundamental rights of people living in the EU are effectively protected. We are delighted to join with academic and civil society partners across the EU and neighbouring states, to continue our work on supporting fundamental rights in the European Union.”Further information on the work of the Fundamental Rights Agency is available at: For more information or queries, contact Professor Siobhán MullallyEmail: siobhan.mullally@nuigalway.ie Tel: +353-(0)91 493 948       Website:    www.nuigalway.ie/human_rights/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/IrishCentreHR Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/IrishHumanRights  

Monday, 4 February 2019

   LUNCHTIME SEMINAR  ‘Truth Commissions and Transitional Justice in Africa: Fulfilling the Promise of Never Again in The Gambia' BY DR. YASSIN BRUNGER  Date: 08th February 2019 Time: 1pm -2pm Venue: Seminar room, Irish Centre for Human Rights Dr Brunger is Lecturer in Human Rights Law and Fellow of the Senator George J Mitchell Institute for Global Peace, Security and Justice. She joined Queens University, School of Law in July 2016, having previously taught at the University of Leicester, University College Dublin and the University of Ulster. Dr Brunger’s primary research and supervision interests are the fields of international criminal law, sexual and gender-based violence, international and comparative criminal evidence, feminist perspectives and transitional justice. Dr Brunger’s work is inherently socio-legal and examines the law in the context of broader conflict and post-conflict dynamics from both a theoretical and empirical perspective. Dr Brunger is currently completing her book on the relationship between the International Criminal Court and UN Security Council (forthcoming Cambridge University Press 2019) which explores the critical intersections between global politics and international criminal justice. Her research has been used to impact and inform policy and practice in the areas of human rights and international criminal justice. Her co-authored paper ‘Witness Preparation in the ICC: An Opportunity for Principled Pragmatism’ was shortlisted for the SLSA Article Prize (2016) and been cited by the Office of the Prosecutor at the International Criminal Court in the case of The Prosecutor v. Laurent Gbagbo and Charles Blé Goudé. Dr Brunger’s Policy Brief for the Institute of Justice and Reconciliation (South Africa) examining “Investigations and Prosecutions of Sexual and Gender-Based Violence by the International Criminal Court” has been widely used to inform the practice of a range of international organizations and NGOs responding to SGBV in conflict and post-conflict countries.    

Wednesday, 3 April 2019

Summer School on the International Criminal Court 24 - 28 June 2019 National University of Ireland Galway * * 20th Anniversary Guest Lecture * Fatou Bensouda Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court The Irish Centre for Human Rights is pleased to announce that Ms. Fatou Bensouda, the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court, will deliver a special guest lecture at the annual International Criminal Court Summer School which takes place in Galway from 24-28 June 2019.  This is the premier summer school specialising on the International Criminal Court and comprises a series of intensive lectures and events over five days. The sessions are lead by academic experts as well as by legal professionals working at the International Criminal Court. Participants are provided with a detailed working knowledge of the establishment of the Court, its structures and operations, and the applicable law and policy. This year marks the 20th Anniversary of the ICC Summer School at NUI Galway. Prosecutor Bensouda will deliver her guest lecture on the evening of Monday 24 June 2019 during the Summer School. This lecture is kindly co-hosted by the Irish Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade. The closing date for registrations is 1 June 2019. A special early-bird discounted registration rate of €400 is available until 10 April 2019. In addition, delegates can opt for a one-day registration for Monday 24 June 2019 for €100, which includes the Prosecutor’s guest lecture (5 CPD points available). For the programme and registration for this year’s Summer School go to: https://nuiggalwayccmichr.clr.events/event/127999#registration Please also follow us on Facebook or Twitter for updates. Any queries can be sent to iccsummerschool@gmail.com    

Monday, 14 January 2019

Prof. William Schabas, “Genocide, the Holocaust, and the Lie of Racial Superiority”, Holocaust Memorial Lecture, Irish Centre for Human Rights, School of Law, NUI Galway. 23 January 2019, 7.00pm to 8.30 pmRoom: MRA201 The Ryan Institute Lecture TheatreBuilding: 072 Ryan Institute Annexe, NUI Galway Prof. William A. Schabas, Emeritus Professor at the Irish Centre for Human Rights, School of Law will deliver a Holocaust Memorial Lecture on the role that ideas of racial superiority played in the Holocaust. He will discuss international efforts, including those of international law, to condemn notions of racial superiority, linking this to the Holocaust, but also to colonialism and the slave trade. He will talk briefly about his own family's experiences with Nazi racism and genocide. The event will be introduced by Prof. Siobhán Mullally, Director, Irish Centre for Human Rights and chaired by Prof. Pól Ó Dochartaigh, Registrar and Deputy President, NUI Galway. Professor Schabas is emeritus professor of human rights law at NUI Galway and honorary chairman of the Irish Centre for Human Rights, professor of international law at Middlesex University and at Leiden University, and a member of the Royal Irish Academy. He is invited visiting scholar at the Paris School of International Affairs (Sciences Politiques), honorary professor at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences in Beijing, visiting fellow of Kellogg College of the University of Oxford, visiting fellow of Northumbria University, and professeur associé at the Université du Québec à Montréal. Prof. Schabas is a 'door tenant' at the chambers of 9 Bedford Row, in London. Prof. Schabas has published extensively in the field of international human rights and criminal law. His most recent book is The Trial of the Kaiser, published by Oxford University Press.

Thursday, 8 November 2018

           Website:    www.nuigalway.ie/human_rights/Twitter: https://twitter.com/IrishCentreHRFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/IrishHumanRights  

Thursday, 1 November 2018

The Irish Centre for Human Rights and the School of Law hosted a panel discussion with Dr Mary Robinson on the ‘The Necessity of Advocacy’ at NUI Galway on Wednesday, 24 October. A recording of the event can be watched below or on YouTube.  Opening remarks are provided by Professor Siobhán Mullally and the event was chaired by Judge Tony O’Connor of the High Court. Guest panellists include: Dr Gearóid O’Cuinn and Gerry Liston of the Global Legal Action Network; Dr Maeve O’Rourke, Irish Council for Civil Liberties and Justice for Magdalenes; Professor Donncha O’Connell, NUI Galway and the Law Reform Commission; and Professor Niamh Reilly, NUI Galway. A podcast of the event is available below: A photo gallery is now up on our Flickrpage:

Thursday, 18 October 2018

  Lunchtime Seminar “The Israeli Military Court of Appeal’s Rulings on International Law” Date: Wed 24 October 2018, Location: Seminar Room, Irish Centre for Human Rights, Time: 12 pm to 1 pm.   In this talk Adv. Nery Ramati will discuss the relationship that has been established between international law, the Israelimilitary courts and Israeli military law in the occupied Palestinian territories through the analysis of the rulings of the Israeli military court of appeals. BioAttorney Nery Ramati is a partner in Gaby Lasky and Partners Law Office, a leading human rights office in Israel, specializing in freedom of expression and protest. He has been representing Palestinian, Israeli and international human rights and anti-occupation activists in the military and civil courts since 2008. He has also provided legal counsel to various organizations engaged in documenting and protesting human rights abuses and violations of international law by the Israeli authorities in the Occupied Palestinian Territories. All Welcome!     Website:    www.nuigalway.ie/human_rights/Twitter: https://twitter.com/IrishCentreHRFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/IrishHumanRights    

Tuesday, 2 October 2018

   The Irish Centre for Human Rights and the School of Law, NUI Galway are delighted to host:  ‘The Necessity of Advocacy’ In conversation with Dr Mary Robinson, former UN High Commissioner for Human Rights and former President of Ireland.   24th October 2018 6pm-8.30pm O'Flaherty Theatre - Concourse (Arts/Science Building) Register at www.conference.ie Limited space - Booking is essential   Chaired by High Court Judge Tony O’Connor   Panel Discussion With: Dr Gearóid O’Cuinn and Gerry Liston (GLAN/ ICHR), Dr Maeve O’Rourke (ICCL and Justice for Magdalenes, incoming NUI Galway), Professor Donncha O’Connell (NUI Galway and Law Reform Commission), Professor Niamh Reilly (NUI Galway) ‌ 

Tuesday, 2 October 2018

  We would like to congratulate Claire Raissain who has been awarded the NUI Travelling Studentship in Law.  Her PhD thesis topic is; ‘Separated Children on the Move in Europe: Access to Protection and Legal Responses to Human Trafficking”, and she will be supervised by Professor Siobhán Mullally. 

Thursday, 6 September 2018

Seminar: Accountability for (International) Human Rights Violations: Human Rights Lawyering Skills When: 18th September 2018, 5pm-6.30pm. Venue: Aula Maxima, NUI, Galway. There is no fee for this event, but advance registration is essential: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/accountability-for-international-human-rights-violations-tickets-49807041201 EVENT DESCRIPTION The Irish Centre for Human Rights and the Global Legal Action Network (GLAN) are pleased to announce the launch of a new collaboration which sees the creation of a placement scheme linking the Centre's students to GLAN's international legal actions. To mark this development, the Centre is hosting a seminar bringing together three leading practitioners to share their own insights and experiences in taking legal actions on international human rights issues, the panel includes: Kirsty Brimlow QC is a barrister at Doughty Street Chambers where she is head of their International Human Rights Team. She specialises in international human rights, criminal law, public international, constitutional and international criminal law and has instructed in the most serious, complex and prominent cases in the UK and internationally. Kirsty is Chair of the Bar Human Rights Committee of England and Wales and also sits on the Advisory Committee of the Global Legal Action Network. Colm O'Dwyer SC (Chair) is an Irish barrister who specialises in human rights, asylum, immigration and public law. Colm regularly pleads before Ireland's Superior Courts, he is a Commissioner with the Irish Human Rights and Equality Commission, and was the first Chair of the Bar of Ireland Human Rights Committee. The seminar will begin with a welcome by Prof Siobhán Mullally, Director of the Irish Centre for Human Rights and an introduction to the Global Legal Action Network by its Director Dr Gearóid Ó Cuinn.   More about the ICHR-GLAN collaboration GLAN is a unique non-profit organisation that pursues innovative legal actions across borders, challenging states and other powerful actors involved with human rights violations. This summer, GLAN commenced recruiting a select number of the Centre’s LLM and PhD students to provide hands on support for its international legal actions. The candidates were selected and brought into three separate projects covering war crimes in Yemen, migration rights and human rights in supply chains. The supervised placements are based in Galway and students link to other GLAN teams via regular video conferencing and online case management systems. Since its inception, GLAN has successfully incorporated clinical legal education into its operations ensuring that students gain meaningful and rewarding experiences that boost the organisation’s capacity and develop its litigation strategies.                       Website:    www.nuigalway.ie/human_rights/Twitter: https://twitter.com/IrishCentreHRFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/IrishHumanRights