Course Overview

This course won the Best New Postgraduate Award (HEA Awards, Ireland) for 2017. More information here.

The world’s climate is rapidly changing due to global warming, and will continue to do so for the decades and centuries ahead. This poses major challenges for future agricultural systems to provide food and other bioresources for the nine billion people that will occupy the planet by 2050.

This programme is aimed at students who want to combine scientific, engineering, technical, social or policy skills so that they are better equipped to understand and make significant contributions regarding the adaptation and mitigation of climate change impacts on global agriculture and food security.The new MSc in Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) provides students with the skills and tools for developing agricultural practices, policies and measures to address the challenge that global warming poses for agriculture and food security worldwide.

Students complete a research project worth one-third of the final grade. This research may be completed at the student’s place of work, within the international CGIAR Research Programme on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security or in collaboration with industry partners.‌

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Applications and Selections

Applications are made online via The Postgraduate Applications Centre(PAC). PAC application code is GYS00. 

Selection is based on the candidate's academic record at an undergraduate level and their aptitude for the course.

Who Teaches this Course

Requirements and Assessment

Semester One Exams: December. Semester Two Exams: April/May. A range of assessment methods are integrated and applied throughout the programme. These include essays, projects, reports, presentations and case studies. A dissertation must also be submitted.

Key Facts

Entry Requirements

NQAI Level 8 honours degree or equivalent to a minimum standard of Second Class Honours, Grade 1 or equivalent in an appropriate discipline is required.

Additional Requirements

Duration

1 year

Next start date

September 2018

A Level Grades ()

Average intake

15

Closing Date

Please refer to the review/closing date website.

Next start date

September 2018

NFQ level

9

Mode of study

Taught

ECTS weighting

90

Award

CAO

PAC code

GYS00

Course Outline

The MSc in Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) will be located within the Discipline of Botany and Plant Science and will have close interactions with the Plant and AgriBiosciences Centre (PABC) at NUI Galway. The CCAFS programme is being developed as a partnership with the international CGIAR Research Programme on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security, which is led by the CGIAR and Future Earth, and currently involves over 700 partners worldwide www.ccafs.cgiar.org

The CCAFS modules will be taught by world-leading scientists and researchers in their areas of expertise. Students will encounter a wide variety of teaching methods. Modules will include webbased learning, lectures, exercises, seminars, excursions and Programme outline group/project work.

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Modules for 2016-17

Curriculum information relates to the current academic year (in most cases).
Course and module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Glossary of Terms

Credits
You must earn a defined number of credits (aka ECTS) to complete each year of your course. You do this by taking all of its required modules as well as the correct number of optional modules to obtain that year's total number of credits.
Optional
A module you may choose to study.
Required
A module that you must study if you choose this course (or subject).
Semester
Most courses have 2 semesters (aka terms) per year.

Year 1 (90 Credits)

Required PAB5101: Climate Change, Agricultural & Global Food Security


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

This module provides an introductory overview of the key topics on the Climate Change, Agriculture and Global Food Security masters degree. The module will provide students with an introduction to a range of climate change, agriculture and food security topics in the context of current challenges regarding sustainable global development.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate knowledge of the current climate change challenges regarding sustainable global development.
  2. Display a clear understanding of the implications of these challenges on sustainable production and global food security.
  3. Identify and discuss the issues and evidence surrounding these challenges and related approaches to mitigation.
  4. Evaluate options for climate change mitigation and adaptation stategies in the context of sustainable production and food security.
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (50%)
  • Continuous Assessment (50%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Climate Change, Agriculture & Global Food Security" by Godfray, H. C. J., Beddington, J. R., Crute, I. R., Haddad, L., Lawrence, D., Muir, J. F., ... & Toulmin, C.
  2. "Achieving food security in the face of climate change: Final report from the Commission on Sustainable Agriculture and Climate Change." by Beddington, J., Asaduzzaman, M., & Clark, M.
  3. "Simultaneously mitigating near-term climate change and improving human health and food security. Science," by Shindell, D., Kuylenstierna, J. C., Vignati, E., van Dingenen, R., Amann, M., Klimont, Z., ... & Fowler, D.
  4. ". Food security, farming, and climate change to 2050: Scenarios, results, policy options (Vol. 172). Intl Food Policy Res Inst." by Nelson, G. C., Rosegrant, M. W., Palazzo, A., Gray, I., Ingersoll, C., Robertson, R., ... & You, L.
  5. "Options for support to agriculture and food security under climate change. Environmental Science & Policy, 15(1), 136-144." by Vermeulen, S. J., Aggarwal, P. K., Ainslie, A., Angelone, C., Campbell, B. M., Challinor, A. J., ... & Wollenberg, E.
  6. "Climate change impacts on global food security. Science," by Wheeler, T., & von Braun, J.
  7. "Handbook on Climate Change and Agriculture." by Ariel Dinar, Robert O. Mendelsohn
  8. "Climate Change and Food Security: Adapting Agriculture to a Warmer World." by David B. Lobell, Marshall Burke
  9. "Impact on Agriculture and Costs of Adaptation" by Impact on Agriculture and Costs of Adaptation
The above information outlines module PAB5101: "Climate Change, Agricultural & Global Food Security" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required PAB5102: Climate Change, Agriculture, Nutrition & Global Health


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

This module covers the key issues and topics regarding climate change, agriculture, nutrition and global health. The module will provide students with the latest scientific evidence and approaches regarding how climate change can impact on; global health, malnutrition, water, sanitation, food systems, infectious diseases, disasters and emergencies and emerging environmental health issues. A key focus will be on case studies and emerging approaches to address problems.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Identify and discuss the key global health challenges for sustainable development
  2. Describe how climate change currently impacts upon global health
  3. Discuss the links between climate change, agriculture and health impacts
  4. Gain insights regarding how health outcomes are linked to climate change challenges
  5. Assess emerging environmental health issues and their relationships with climate change
  6. Harness effective methods and approaches for assessing health impacts due to climate change
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (50%)
  • Continuous Assessment (50%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Impact of regional climate change on human health. Nature, 438(7066), 310-317." by Patz, J. A., Campbell-Lendrum, D., Holloway, T., & Foley, J. A.
  2. "Climate change and human health: present and future risks. The Lancet, 367(9513), 859-869." by McMichael, A. J., Woodruff, R. E., & Hales, S.
  3. "Climate change and human health: impacts, vulnerability and public health."" by Haines, Andy, et al.
  4. "Food, livestock production, energy, climate change, and health. The lancet, 370(9594), 1253-1263." by McMichael, A. J., Powles, J. W., Butler, C. D., & Uauy, R.
  5. "Health and climate change: modelling the impacts of global warming and ozone depletion. Routledge." by Martens, P.
  6. "The effectiveness of public health interventions to reduce the health impact of climate change: a systematic review of systematic reviews. PloS one, 8(4), e62041." by Bouzid, M., Hooper, L., & Hunter, P. R.
  7. "Public health impact of global heating due to climate change: potential effects on chronic non-communicable diseases." International journal of public health 55.2 (2010): 97-103." by Kjellstrom, Tord, et al.
  8. "Climate change and infectious diseases: From evidence to a predictive framework. science, 341(6145), 514-519." by Altizer, S., Ostfeld, R. S., Johnson, P. T., Kutz, S., & Harvell, C. D.
The above information outlines module PAB5102: "Climate Change, Agriculture, Nutrition & Global Health" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required PAB5103: Policy & Scenarios for Climate Change Adaptation & Mitigation


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

This module will highlight the importance of policy analysis methods to address challenges posed by climate change, including how to engage in policy processes and prepare policy-relevant information. The module will cover policy options for dealing with the effects of climate change on agriculture and food security that are being pursued or considered by policy makers globally and locally as well as provide an understanding of how to engage in the policy process.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Display a clear understanding of policy processes and policy frameworks relating to climate change, agriculture and food security, and the importance of linkages between different policies.
  2. Identify and evaluate a range of policy options for dealing with the effects of climate change on livelihoods, agriculture and food security.
  3. Identify, utilise and apply policy analysis tools and frameworks for development of improved policies for climate change, agriculture and food security.
  4. Be aware of the latest policy developments, trends and issues relating to climate change, agriculture and food security
  5. Evaluate a range of policy options for dealing with the effects of climate change on livelihoods, agriculture and food security.
  6. Update students on the latest policy developments, trends and issues relating to climate change, agriculture and food security
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (50%)
  • Continuous Assessment (50%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Handbook on Climate Change and Agriculture." by Ariel Dinar, Robert O. Mendelsohn
  2. "Climate Change: Impact on Agriculture and Costs of Adaptation" by Gerald C Nelson et a
  3. "The economics of climate change. Vol. 30." by Stern Review
    Publisher: London: HM treasury
  4. "The policy process: an overview. London: Overseas Development Institute." by Sutton, R
  5. "Policy entrepreneurs and the diffusion of innovation. American journal of political science," by Mintrom, M
The above information outlines module PAB5103: "Policy & Scenarios for Climate Change Adaptation & Mitigation" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required PAB5104: Gender, Agriculture & Climate Change


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

This module will address climate change from a social perspective, including considering how its causes and effects relate to concepts of equity. This will include examining issues such as gender equality, human rights and livelihoods in relation to climate change, agriculture and food security.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand climate change and gender linked ramifications in four pillars of food security: food availability, food accessibility, food utilization and food systems stability.
  2. Outline gender linked differences in other key issues in the context of climate change (water, health, migration patterns due to environmental degradation)
  3. Underline the importance of involving women as agents of change in climate change responses and incorporate gender perspectives in research agendas, information, and climate change responses.
  4. Appreciate the gender-relevance of frameworks for policy analysis, databases, methods and ex ante impact assessment for planning responses to climate change in agriculture.
  5. Generate ideas for gender sensitive responses to the effects of climate change – in technology developments and financing mechanisms (gender analysis of budget lines and financial instruments for climate change, gender-sensitive investments in programmes for adaptation, mitigation, technology transfer and capacity building).
  6. Outline how governments can incorporate gender perspectives into their interventions on climate change
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (50%)
  • Continuous Assessment (50%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Climate change vulnerability, impacts, and adaptation: why does gender matter?. Gender & Development, 10(2), 10-20." by Denton, F.
  2. "Uncertain predictions, invisible impacts, and the need to mainstream gender in climate change adaptations. Gender & Development, 10(2), 51-59." by Nelson, V., Meadows, K., Cannon, T., Morton, J., & Martin, A.
  3. "Climate change: Learning from gender analysis and women's experiences of organising for sustainable development. Gender & Development, 10(2), 21-29." by Dankelman, I.
  4. "The gender dimensions of poverty and climate change adaptation. IDS bulletin, 39(4), 24-31." by Demetriades, J., & Esplen, E.
  5. "No climate justice without gender justice: an overview of the issues. Gender & Development, 17(1), 5-18." by Terry, G.
  6. "Climate justice: A new social movement for atmospheric rights." by Pettit, J.
  7. "Climate justice and historical emissions. Critical review of international social and political philosophy, 13(1), 229-253." by Meyer, L. H., & Roser, D.
  8. "The Trade-off between Intra-and Intergenerational Equity in Climate Policy (No. 4285). CESifo Working Paper." by Kverndokk, S., Nævdal, E., & Nøstbakken, L.
  9. "Climate geoengineering: solar radiation management and its implications for intergenerational equity. Stanford Journal of Law, Science & Policy" by Burns, W. C.
  10. "Women: The key to food security." by Brown, L. R., Feldstein, H. S., Haddad, L., & Peña, C.
  11. "Gender, development, and climate change." by Masika, R. (Ed.)
  12. "Climate Change and Global Policy Regimes" by Timothy Cadman
  13. "Gender and Climate Change: An Introduction." by Dankelman, I.
    Publisher: Earthscan
  14. "Gender and Climate Change Research in Agriculture and Food Security for Rural Development http://www.fao.org/docrep/018/i3385e/i3385e.pdf" by FAO and CCAFS
  15. "Gender in Agriculture Sourcebook" by Gender in Agriculture Sourcebook
    Publisher: World Bank, Washington DC, USA
The above information outlines module PAB5104: "Gender, Agriculture & Climate Change" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required PAB5105: Low-Emissions & Climate-Smart Agriculture & AgriFood Systems


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

Agriculture and food production/supply is threatened by climate change with impacts of climate change expected to be overall negative, thereby threatening global food supply and food security. This module will evaluate low-emissions and climate-smart agriculture strategies for the emerging decades where sustainable intensification is urgently required to meet food and bio-resource demands.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Describe past and present day impacts of agriculture on greenhouse gas emissions and climate change.
  2. Evaluate the synergies and trade-offs which exist among emissions reductions, food and energy security, climate change adaptation and other sustainable development goals.
  3. Examine the incentives for lower emissions food systems that have a lower environmental footprint.
  4. Assess how to quantify greenhouse gas emissions from smallholder farming systems.
  5. Assess emerging technologies for precision and smart agriculture for their potential to deliver significant emissions reductions from agriculture
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (50%)
  • Continuous Assessment (50%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Climate-smart agriculture: smallholder adoption and implications for climate change adaptation and mitigation. Mitigation of Climate Change in Agriculture Working Paper, (3)." by McCarthy, N., Lipper, L., & Branca, G.
  2. "Precision agriculture and food security. Science," by Gebbers, R., & Adamchuk, V. I.
  3. "Achieving food security while switching to low carbon agriculture. Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy, 4(4), 041405." by Fan, S., & Ramirez, A.
  4. "The poverty implications of climate-induced crop yield changes by 2030. Global Environmental Change, 20(4), 577-585." by Hertel, T. W., Burke, M. B., & Lobell, D. B.
  5. "Achieving food security while switching to low carbon agriculture. Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy, 4(4), 041405." by Fan, S., & Ramirez, A.
  6. "Energy and the food system. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 365(1554), 2991-3006." by Woods, J., Williams, A., Hughes, J. K., Black, M., & Murphy, R.
  7. "Where are the best opportunities for reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the food system (including the food chain)?. Food policy, 36, S23-S32." by Garnett, T.
  8. "Integrated food–energy systems for climate-smart agriculture" by Bogdanski, A.
  9. "Life cycle assessment: past, present, and future†. Environmental science & technology, 45(1), 90-96." by Guinee, J. B., Heijungs, R., Huppes, G., Zamagni, A., Masoni, P., Buonamici, R., ... & Rydberg, T.
  10. "Climate Change and Crop Production" by Matthew P. Reynolds
  11. "Climate Change and Crops." by S.N. Singh,
  12. "Climate Change and Global Crop Production" by K. Raja Reddy, H. F. Hodges,
The above information outlines module PAB5105: "Low-Emissions & Climate-Smart Agriculture & AgriFood Systems" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required PAB5106: Climate Change Adaptation, Mitigation & Risk Management


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

Managing risks associated with climate change is an integral component of a comprehensive strategy for adapting agriculture and food systems to a changing climate. This module will assess climate innovations for managing climate-related agricultural risk at local, national and international level and strategies for their implementation in both the developed and developing worlds.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Describe the underlying basis and parameters of climate change prediction models in relation to agriculture and food security.
  2. Identify evidence-based risks associated with climate variability and emerging strategies for adapting agriculture and food systems to a changing climate.
  3. Identify and evaluate innovations in partnerships between rural communities that enable then to better manage climate-related risk and build more resilient livelihoods.
  4. Apply strategies/tools to use advance information to better manage climate challenges associated with food production, supply and crisis management.
  5. Appreciate the role of risk management through enhanced prediction tools and techniques for climate impacts on agriculture and food security.
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (50%)
  • Continuous Assessment (50%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Quantification of modelling uncertainties in a large ensemble of climate change simulations. Nature," by Murphy, J. M., Sexton, D. M., Barnett, D. N., Jones, G. S., Webb, M. J., Collins, M., & Stainforth, D. A.
  2. "Prioritizing climate change adaptation needs for food security in 2030. Science, 319(5863), 607-610." by Lobell, D. B., Burke, M. B., Tebaldi, C., Mastrandrea, M. D., Falcon, W. P., & Naylor, R. L.
  3. "Global response of terrestrial ecosystem structure and function to CO2 and climate change: results from six" by Cramer, W., Bondeau, A., Woodward, F. I., Prentice, I. C., Betts, R. A., Brovkin, V., ... & Young?Molling, C.
  4. "Climate change and global water resources. Global environmental change" by Arnell, N. W.
  5. "Adaptation to climate change in forest management. Journal of Ecosystems and Management, 4(1)." by Spittlehouse, D. L., & Stewart, R. B.
  6. "Adapting agriculture to climate change. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 104(50), 19691-19696." by Howden, S. M., Soussana, J. F., Tubiello, F. N., Chhetri, N., Dunlop, M., & Meinke, H
  7. "A climate-change risk analysis for world ecosystems. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 103(35), 13116-13120." by Scholze, M., Knorr, W., Arnell, N. W., & Prentice, I. C.
  8. "Extinction risk from climate change. Nature, 427(6970), 145-148." by Thomas, C. D., Cameron, A., Green, R. E., Bakkenes, M., Beaumont, L. J., Collingham, Y. C., ... & Williams, S. E.
  9. "Climate Change and Flood Risk Management" by E. Carina H. Keskitalo
  10. "Climate Change and Disaster Risk Management." by Walter Leal Filho
  11. "Climate Change Adaptation and Disaster Risk Reduction" by Rajib Shaw, Juan M. Pulhin, Joy J. Pereira
The above information outlines module PAB5106: "Climate Change Adaptation, Mitigation & Risk Management" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required PAB5107 : Sustainable Bio-Based & Circular Economy


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Required PAB5113: PAB5113 CCAFS Research Project


12 months long | Credits: 30

The CCAFS research project placement will allow students to conduct research to address the challenges climate change poses to agriculture and food production and overall sustainable global development. The CCAFS research project will be conducted with partners & research groups who are engaged in research on climate change, agriculture and food security.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate knowledge of the specific climate change challenges regarding sustainable global development in the region where CCAFS research project is conducted.
  2. Display a clear understanding of the implications of these challenges on sustainable production and global food security in the region of their CCAFS project placement.
  3. Identify and discuss the issues surrounding these challenges and related approaches to mitigation in a practical context in the region.
  4. Evaluate options for mitigation and adaptation stategies in the context of sustainable production and food security given the available resources.
  5. Identify future projects that can be valuable in the region of the CCAFS project placement.
  6. Engage in a research program or support an existing research program in the region of the CCASF research project that is already addressing some of the challenges of climate change, agriculture and food security.
Assessments
  • Research (100%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module PAB5113: "PAB5113 CCAFS Research Project" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required PAB5111: PAB5111 CCAFS Perspectives


Semester 1 and Semester 2 | Credits: 5

This module will provide a range of different and multi-disciplinary perspectives & case studies on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security involving seminars and discussion with CCAFS experts from government, research centres, universities, NGOs, private sector and other stakeholders. The module will develop students breadth of knowledge and perspectives regarding CCAFS and develop critical thinking skills that are of relevance for research to inform decision-making and actions regarding climate change, agriculture and food security.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Consider how different disciplines and sectors have differing perspectives regarding climate change, agriculture and food security
  2. Appreciate how presentations and case studies on CCAFS topics can be differently framed by different sectors and disciplines
  3. Critically review case studies and perspectives in the context of CCAFS challenges
  4. Present and discuss opinions in an open forum as a group and individually.
  5. Learn how to present questions to different CCAFS stakeholders and to engage in dialogue with other disciplines/sectors regarding CCAFS topics
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module PAB5111: "PAB5111 CCAFS Perspectives" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required PAB5108: Climate Change, Natural Resources & Livelihoods


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

This module deals with how climate change is affecting soils, microbes, water and marine systems, including impacts on sustainable livelihoods and livelihood security. In many instances, climate change impacts are requiring an urgent need for response measures that minimize current vulnerabilities. By understanding how climate change impacts on natural resources and capital, response and resilience systems for adaptation and mitigation of negative effects of climate change can be fostered.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Describe which social or economic groups within the community are particularly vulnerable to climate change
  2. Evaluate which resources are most important to the livelihoods of different social groups
  3. Identify how current climate hazards affect livelihoods and related resources of different groups
  4. Assess which livelihoods resources are most vulnerable to climate change
  5. Investigate adaptation and mitigation strategies to maintain viable livliehoods when faced with climate change challenges
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (100%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module PAB5108: "Climate Change, Natural Resources & Livelihoods" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required PAB5109: PAB5109 AgriBiological Responses to Climate Change


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

Global climate change impacts can already be observed in many physical and biological systems. Climate change will affect agriculture and forestry systems through higher temps, elevated CO2 concentration, precipitation changes, increased weeds, pests, and disease pressure, and increased vulnerability of carbon pools. This module will examine biological responses of plants/crops and agri-systems to climate changes.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Appreciate how climate change can impact on environmental adaptation of biological organisms of relevance to agriculture and agri-food systems
  2. Discuss the difference between avoidance, acclimation and adaptation
  3. Describe how susceptibility to, or tolerance of stress can explain plant survival and habitat preferences
  4. Summarise photosynthetic pathways and how they are affected by different environmental conditions, including climate change
  5. Describe different plant stresses and the implications for global crop productivity.
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (50%)
  • Continuous Assessment (50%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Crop Adaptation to Climate Change" by Yadav et al.
    Publisher: Wiley Blackwell.
  2. "Climate Change and Agriculture: An economic analysis of global impact, adaptation and distributional effects." by Mendelsohn, R., and Dinar, A.
  3. "Climate Change in the 21st Century" by Cohen, S., and Waddell, M.
  4. "Plant growth and climate change" by Morison, J., and Moredroft, M.
  5. "Plants on the Margins" by Crawford, R.
The above information outlines module PAB5109: "PAB5109 AgriBiological Responses to Climate Change" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required PAB5110: CCAFS Science Communication


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

Science communication can aim to generate support for scientific research or study, to inform decision making, political and policy thinking. This module will develop an understanding of the interactions between science and society, ensuring an understanding of the social significance of science in society. This module with introduce topics in science communication, internet and social media skills, social marketing and critical thinking regarding science and CCAFS communication activities.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Critically evaluate which sources of information regarding climate change, agriculture and food security are most reliable and trustworthy.
  2. Discuss a technical scientific topic for various audiences through news print, broadcast and social media
  3. Identify key approaches and constraints for environmental and risk communication regarding CCAFS
  4. Assess the efficacy of different science communication approaches in context of CCAFS
  5. Consider different approaches for the analysis and implementation of effective science communication
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Communicating climate change: Why frames matter for public engagement. Environment: Science and Policy for Sustainable Development, 51(2), 12-23." by Nisbet, M. C.
  2. "Constructing the scientific citizen: science and democracy in the biosciences. Public understanding of science, 10(1), 1-18." by Irwin, A.
  3. "What’s next for science communication? Promising directions and lingering distractions. American Journal of Botany, 96(10), 1767-1778." by Nisbet, M. C., & Scheufele, D. A.
  4. "Social marketing: Influencing behaviors for good." by Lee, N. R., & Kotler, P.
    Publisher: Sage Publications.
  5. "The new influencers: A marketer's guide to the new social media" by The new influencers: A marketer's guide to the new social media
    Publisher: Linden Publishing.
The above information outlines module PAB5110: "CCAFS Science Communication" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required PAB5112: CCAFS Research Skills & Techniques


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

This module aims to formally introduce MSc CCAFS trainees to the research process regarding CCAFS, including theory, critical thinking and provide an overview of methodologies and methods associated with carrying out independent research or research within a team. This module is designed to provide a basic understanding of the scientific research process and how to identify quality research that is robust and reliable.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Provide an overview of the research process in relation to climate change, agriculture and food security
  2. State clearly their research problem and associated research questions arising, including both descriptive and either explanatory or exploratory questions
  3. Conduct a preliminary literature review of the concepts comprising the research questions
  4. Set out clearly a series of theoretical propositions for testing and demonstrate clearly how they arise from the literature review
  5. Set out the main elements of a potential research instrument for testing the hypotheses
  6. Develop skills for how to classify, analyse, interpret and present quantitative and qualitative data
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Research methods for Science" by Marder, M.
    Publisher: Cambridge Press.
  2. "Research Methodology-An Introduction." by Goddard, W., and Melville, S.,
    Publisher: Juta & Co. Ltd.
  3. "Media and Communication Research Methods." by Berger,A.
The above information outlines module PAB5112: "CCAFS Research Skills & Techniques" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Why Choose This Course?

Career Opportunities

As the climate change challenge for sustainable development and business on the planet intensifies, there will be a need in all organisations for personnel skilled in both climate change adaptation and mitigation strategies/approaches for the development of greener economies, agrifood systems and low-environmental footprint supply chains. Graduates of this MSc will be well positioned for positions in research, policy, enterprise, business, administration and other activities across a wide range of public and private sector institutions internationally. Career mentoring, advice, strategy and facilitation will be provided to all students on the MSc CCAFS to ensure that they rapidly enter employment in relevant institutions and activities, where they can build from their interests, experience and training.

Who’s Suited to This Course

Learning Outcomes

 

Work Placement

Study Abroad

Related Student Organisations

Course Fees

Fees: EU

€7,015 p.a. 2018/19

Fees: Tuition

€6,791 p.a. 2018/19

Fees: Student levy

€224 p.a. 2018/19

Fees: Non EU

€14,750 p.a. 2018/19
For further information on postgraduate funding and scholarship opportunities see here

Find out More

Professor Charles Spillane
Head of Plant and AgriBiosciences Research Centre (PABC)
T: +353 91 494 148 | E: charles.spillane@nuigalway.ie

Dr Peter McKeown
MScCCAFS Programme Co-ordinator
T: +353 91 492340 | E: peter.mckeown@nuigalway.ie