Course Overview


This programme is specifically designed with dedicated courses to deepen students’ understanding of the forces driving the global economy and the operations of the international financial markets. The programme provides both a rigorous foundation in the theory of international finance and necessary technical skills used in applied financial market analysis.

It provides an emphasis on current issues in international economic policy and on recent developments in the areas of multinational investment flows, dynamics of exchange rates, risk management and asset pricing. Students gain a deeper understanding of both the microstructure and macroeconomic implications of these issues, and necessary technical skills for analysing financial data using computer simulation-based models.

The financial services industry, which is a part of the internationally traded services sector, has been identified by the Irish government as one of the key sectors for the delivery of high value-added jobs in Ireland and a crucial sector in the further development of Ireland’s knowledge-based economy.

The programme provides a special emphasis on current issues in international economic policy and on recent developments in the areas of multinational investment flows, dynamics of exchange rates, risk management and asset pricing.

Students gain a deeper understanding of both the microstructure and macroeconomic implications of these issues, and necessary technical skills for analysing financial data using computer simulation based models.

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Applications and Selections

Applications are made online via the NUI Galway Postgraduate Applications System

Who Teaches this Course

Requirements and Assessment

Semester One exams: December.
Semester Two exams: April/May. 

A range of assessment methods are integrated and applied throughout the programme. These include essays, projects, reports, presentations, and computer simulation-based assignments. Students also submit a minor dissertation.

Key Facts

Entry Requirements

Students admitted to the programme will normally hold a primary degree with Second Class Honours, Grade 1 or equivalent international qualification*, which will have included the study and understanding of economics to intermediate level.** Students who hold a Higher Diploma in Economics with Second Class Honours, Grade 1, or equivalent international qualification may also apply. IELTS scores of 6.5 or equivalent if applicable.

* In exceptional cases a person without a 2.1 primary degree may be admitted if economics is a major part of their undergraduate degree and if they have achieved a 2.1 average in the economics courses they have taken.

** By "intermediate level economics" we mean courses in microeconomics and macroeconomics at a level typically done in second or third year of an undergraduate programme. Accordingly people who have only studied one year of economics are not eligible for admission.


Additional Requirements

Duration

1 year, full-time

Next start date

September 2021

A Level Grades ()

Average intake

30

Closing Date

Please refer to the offer rounds/closing date webpage.

NFQ level

Mode of study

Taught

ECTS weighting

Award

CAO

Course code

1MIF1

Course Outline

The programme provides a special emphasis on current issues in international economic policy and on recent developments in the areas of multinational investment flows, dynamics of exchange rates, risk management and asset pricing.

Students gain a deeper understanding of both the microstructure and macroeconomic implications of these issues, and necessary technical skills for analysing financial data using computer simulation based models.

Graduates with these skills are highly valued by commercial banks, investment banks and other financial institutions, by public institutions such as Central Banks and by multinational corporations.The Financial Services industry, which is a part of Internationally Traded Services, has been identified by the Irish Government as one of the key sectors for the delivery of high value-added jobs in Ireland and a crucial sector in the further development of Ireland's knowledge-based economy.

The programme includes such modules as:

  • Macroeconomic Theory and Policy
  • Microeconomic Theory
  • Applied Portfolio Management
  • Derivatives and Risk Management
  • Economics and the Global Economy
  • Financial and Macroeconomic History
  • Financial Data Analytics
  • Financial Econometrics
  • Global Financial Economics
  • International Finance

Curriculum Information

Curriculum information relates to the current academic year (in most cases).
Course and module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Glossary of Terms

Credits
You must earn a defined number of credits (aka ECTS) to complete each year of your course. You do this by taking all of its required modules as well as the correct number of optional modules to obtain that year's total number of credits.
Module
An examinable portion of a subject or course, for which you attend lectures and/or tutorials and carry out assignments. E.g. Algebra and Calculus could be modules within the subject Mathematics. Each module has a unique module code eg. MA140.
Optional
A module you may choose to study.
Required
A module that you must study if you choose this course (or subject).
Semester
Most courses have 2 semesters (aka terms) per year.

Year 1 (90 Credits)

Required EC5128: Financial Econometrics


Semester 1 | Credits: 10

The aim of this course is to provide students with an accessible introduction to current models and techniques in time series analysis. This course is designed to provide students with the tools needed to carry out empirical research in international finance. Students will be given the opportunity to apply these tools in a financial econometrics research project. The project and course lab sessions will provide students with hands on experience in analysing time series data sets.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Develop an understanding of the principles underlying the Ordinary Least Squares (OLS)
  2. Understand the implications of assumptions underlying OLS
  3. Conduct hypothesis tests
  4. Test for the presence of Unit Roots
  5. Model univariate time-series using the ARIMA methodology
  6. Model multivariate time-series using the VAR methodology and test for causation between variables
  7. Explore co-integration between series
  8. Model volatility using ARCH/GARCH Models
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Written Assessment (70%)
  • Continuous Assessment (30%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Applied Econometrics: A Modern Approach (An Introductory Text)" by Asteriou, Dimities and Hall, Stephen
    Publisher: Palgrave: London
  2. "Introductory Econometrics for Finance" by Brooks,Chris
    Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  3. "An Introduction to Applied Econometrics" by Patterson, Kerry
    Publisher: Macmillan Press: London
  4. "Applied Econometric Time Series (A more advanced text)" by Enders, Walter
    Publisher: Wiley: New York
The above information outlines module EC5128: "Financial Econometrics" and is valid from 2020 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required EC505: Dissertation


12 months long | Credits: 10

The thesis provides an opportunity for independent and original work. The aims of the dissertation is to enable the student to critically evaluate research in economics; to demonstrate independent research and to apply theoretical knowledge acquired; to demonstrate critical thinking skills and to produce a well written minor dissertation of approximately 10,000 words in length that contributes to existing knowledge; and where appropriate is normally linked to an internship. This module involves a series of discussions and meetings with supervisors, submission of research proposals, progress reporting to supervisors within agreed timeframes, and linked to the internship where appropriate.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Formulate a valid research question and explain the rationale for this question
  2. Conduct a literature review
  3. Review secondary data, where appropriate
  4. Choose the appropriate method to address this question (theoretical, empirical or both)
  5. Present research findings at the standard appropriate
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Research (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module EC505: "Dissertation" and is valid from 2019 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required EC5104: Applied Portfolio Management


Semester 1 | Credits: 10

Successful portfolio management requires the development of a broad array of quantitative and qualitative skills, involving an analysis of both the investment instruments available in the capital market and the objectives and constraints of the ultimate investor. In addition, we will explore the linkages between portfolio management and modern risk management. This involves some interaction with the Semester 2 module EC568 Derivatives & Risk Management. We will also explore how to perform some of the quantitative analysis using Excel. This will be integrated into your years work assignment. To facilitate your learning of Excel, a series of laboratory sessions will be scheduled later in the semester. Guest speakers from the financial services industry will give talks on aspects of portfolio management. Further details will be made available as the times and dates for these talks are confirmed.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Explore how to perform some of the quantitative analysis using Excel
  2. On completion of the course, students should be in a position to understand these issues in quantitative financial economics from both an academic and practitioner perspective.
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Written Assessment (60%)
  • Continuous Assessment (40%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Investments and Portfolio Management" by Bodie, Kane & Marcus,
    Publisher: McGraw-Hill
  2. "Running Money: Professional Portfolio Management" by Stewart, Piros & Heisler
    Publisher: McGraw-Hill
  3. "Quantitative Equity Portfolio Management" by Chincarini & Kim
    Publisher: McGraw-Hill
  4. "Investments" by Cuthbertson & Nitzsche
    Publisher: Wiley
  5. "Modern Porfolio Theory and Investment Analysis" by Elton, Gruber, Brown, Goetzmann
    Publisher: Wiley
  6. "Options, Futures and Other Derivatives" by Hull
The above information outlines module EC5104: "Applied Portfolio Management" and is valid from 2015 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required EC5109: Macroeconomic Theory and Policy


Semester 1 | Credits: 10

The objective of this module is to provide a masters-level introduction to macroeconomics organised under six topics: 1. Why are some countries so rich and others so poor? Introduction to growth and development; 2. Irish Economic Growth; 3. Understanding Unemployment: A medium-Run Perspective; 4. Understanding Business Cycles. 5. Macroeconomic Policy I - Monetary and Banking Policy; 6. Macroeconomic Policy II: Fiscal Policy. Policy-focused debates will be a key component of this course.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Develop a modern tool-kit for macroeconomic modelling
  2. Develop an understanding of key papers in the literature on policy-relevant macroeconomic models
  3. Demonstrate a capacity to critically assess econometrics studies in macroeconomics
  4. Critically assess current developments in national and European macroeconomic policy
  5. Demonstrate a capacity to clearly present as part of a team an analysis on a policy-relevant macroeconomic topic
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Written Assessment (80%)
  • Continuous Assessment (20%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Advanced Macroeconomics" by Romer, David.
    Publisher: McGraw-Hill
The above information outlines module EC5109: "Macroeconomic Theory and Policy" and is valid from 2015 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required EC5127: Financial Data Analytics


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

The aim of this module is to introduce students to financial data analytics and empirical methods used in finance. The module focuses on quantitative techniques that are used in asset valuation, portfolio management, derivative valuation, risk management and financial decision making. Different core financial models are estimated and discussed. In addition, students are introduced to machine learning techniques in finance. Overall, the module has an applied focus and students will get hands-on experience with financial data analytics based on real data. Students will also be introduced to computer programming in Python, where these financial techniques are implemented.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the role of different computational and analytical techniques used in quantitative finance
  2. Explain stochastic processes and their importance for quantitative finance
  3. Conduct approriate risk management analytical techniques
  4. Use machine learning methods to help analyse and prepare investment strategies
  5. Implement financial data analytics in the Python programming language
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Written Assessment (60%)
  • Continuous Assessment (40%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module EC5127: "Financial Data Analytics" and is valid from 2020 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required EC5119: Derivatives and Risk Management


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

• This course is an introduction to modern derivatives and risk management. We begin by exploring the basic features of futures, swaps and options with an emphasis on economic intuition and understanding, although important quantitative techniques are developed. • We use the insights developed in these topics to examine some well-known examples of derivatives mishaps and recent applications of derivatives, including credit derivatives and weather derivatives.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. To understand key concepts, equations and terms
  2. Explore the basic features of futures, swaps and options
  3. To examine some well-known examples of derivatives mishaps and recent applications of derivatives, including credit derivatives and weather derivatives
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Written Assessment (60%)
  • Continuous Assessment (40%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Options, Futures, & Other Derivatives" by John C. Hull
The above information outlines module EC5119: "Derivatives and Risk Management" and is valid from 2018 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required EC563: International Finance


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

This module continues the development of macroeconomic tools begun in the Semester 1 module, Macroeconomic Theory and Policy. The focus shifts in this module to international financial and economic issues. Topics to be covered include: international capital flows and financial markets, the current account balance, real and nominal exchange rates, currency and financial crises, exchange rate regimes (including monetary union), monetary and financial policy in the Euro Zone, and sovereign debt and default. The global economic and financial crisis of 2007-08 and the Euro Zone crisis of 2010-2013 again provide the backdrop to much of the material covered. A novel feature of this module will be an ongoing discussion of these crises organised around the treatment in Martin Wolf’s recent book, The Shifts and the Shocks. This module aims to provide an accessible masters-level introduction to open economy macroeconomics and finance.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Motivate each topic by reviewing key facts and policy issues
  2. Show how macroeconomic models can be used to think through the questions and to formulate hypotheses to bring to the data
  3. Demonstrate how econometric tools can be used to improve our empirical understanding of how the macro economy functions
  4. Return to the motivating questions to debate the appropriate policy course
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Written Assessment (70%)
  • Continuous Assessment (30%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "The Shifts and the Shocks" by Martin Wolf
    ISBN: 0718197976.
    Publisher: Penguin UK
  2. "Foundations of International Macroeconomics" by *Obstfeld, M. and K. Rogoff
    Chapters: 1
  3. "Sudden Stops in the euro area" by *Merler S. and J. Pisani-Ferry
    Publisher: Bruegal. Available at: http://www.bruegel.org/publications/publication-detail/publication/718-sudden-stops-in-the-euro-area/
  4. "World Economic Outlook" by International Monetary Fund
    Publisher: http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/weo/2014/02/
    Chapters: 4
  5. "“The Breakup of the Euro Area,” In Europe and the Euro, Alberto Alesina and Francesco Giavazzi, editors" by Eichengreen, B.
    Publisher: The University of Chicago Press.
The above information outlines module EC563: "International Finance" and is valid from 2020 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional EC501: Microeconomic Theory


Semester 1 | Credits: 10

The course will cover the core topics in microeconomic theory at the Masters level.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand the properties of binary relations
  2. Prove the utility representation theorem
  3. Understand how to derive Marshallian and Hicksian demands using the method of Lagrange multipliers
  4. Derive the Slutsky Equation and understand the principle of duality in consumer theory
  5. Understand the central tenets of producer theory; Debreu's representation of production, profit maximisation, Hotelling's Lemma
  6. Derive a “Law of Supply”.
  7. Understand general equilibrium theory and prove existence of equilibrium using Brouwer's fixed point theorem
  8. Understand the principles of social choice and understand the reasoning behind Arrow’s Impossibility Theorem.
  9. Understand the principles of non-cooperative game theory and Nash's proof of the existence of equilibrium in these games
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Written Assessment (70%)
  • Continuous Assessment (30%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Advanced Microeconomic Theory" by Geoffrey A. Jehle & Philip J. Reny
    Publisher: F.T. Prentice-Hall
  2. "Microeconomic Analysis" by Hal R. Varian
    Publisher: W. W. Norton and Co.
  3. "Microeconomic Theory" by A. Mas-Colell, M.D. Whinston & J. R. Green
    Publisher: Oxford University Press
  4. "A Course in Microeconomic Theory" by D. Kreps
    Publisher: FT Prentice Hall
  5. "Mathematics for Economists" by C.P. Simon & L. E. Blume
    Publisher: WW Norton
The above information outlines module EC501: "Microeconomic Theory" and is valid from 2020 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional EC5129: Global Financial Economics


Semester 1 | Credits: 10

This module surveys developments in global financial markets and institutions, providing an overview of challenges for industry, policy and society. A key focus is on sourcing high quality data and analysis on industry developments, and on framing interpretations in the light of evolving theoretical approaches, and societal concerns. Particular attention is paid to developments in banking systems and securities markets in a post-global financial crisis environment, and to challenges for regulators and for industry in respect of rapid technological and political change.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Identify and assess significant developments in financial market structures and institutional forms
  2. Access and analyse relevant quantitative indicators of financial market developments
  3. Relate empirical industry data to influential theoretical frameworks in financial economics
  4. Relate developments in the financial sector to policy goals and instruments
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Written Assessment (70%)
  • Continuous Assessment (30%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module EC5129: "Global Financial Economics" and is valid from 2020 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional EC5124: Economics and the Global Economy


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

The aim of this module is to increase students’ understanding of economics and economic issues in the global economy. Topics include the scope of economics, global economic issues, methodology and economic models, role of economic policy and policymakers, economic performance: measurement and analysis, and the economic and business environment.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand the scope of economics
  2. Assess global economic issues
  3. Knowledge and application of methodologies and economic modelling
  4. Appraise economic policy and the role of policymakers
  5. Interpret and analyse economic performance
  6. Evaluate the economic and business environment
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Written Assessment (80%)
  • Continuous Assessment (20%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Principles of Economics" by Turley, G., Maloney, M. and O'Toole, F.
    Publisher: Gill and Macmillan
The above information outlines module EC5124: "Economics and the Global Economy" and is valid from 2020 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional EC5126: Financial and Macroeconomic History


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

Economists and financial market participants increasingly value the perspectives and insights offered by historical approaches. This module surveys the evolution of financial markets and institutions, and their relationships to the evolving global macroeconomic environment. Focussing initially on Europe and Atlantic economies, we survey the development of equity, foreign exchange, and government debt markets over historical time, exploring the availability of empirical evidence from diverse sources. There is a particular emphasis on how modern finance theory and time series econometrics are both useful in, and challenged by, historical financial data.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Identify and use a range of historical financial data from diverse sources
  2. Relate the evolution of key financial markets and institutions to historical and contemporary macroeconomic environments
  3. Apply a range of empirical techniques (including core time-series econometrics methods) to the analysis of historical financial data
  4. Assess the usefulness of contemporary theoretical models in interpreting historical financial data in a variety of contexts
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Written Assessment (70%)
  • Continuous Assessment (30%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module EC5126: "Financial and Macroeconomic History" and is valid from 2020 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Why Choose This Course?

Career Opportunities

Graduates with the skills taught in this programme are highly valued by commercial banks, investment banks and other financial institutions, by public institutions such as Central Banks and by multinational corporations. Employers of graduates of this programme include Goldman Sachs, J.P. Morgan, First Derivatives, European Central Bank, and Central Bank of Ireland. This
programme can also be a stepping stone to a PhD programme.

Special emphasis is given to current issues in international economic policy and to recent developments in cross-border investment, exchange rates, risk management and asset pricing. Graduates with these skills are highly valued by banks and other financial institutions, by public institutions such as central banks and by multinational corporations.

Develop a Career Path

The programme is your passport to the exciting and rewarding world of financial services. This postgraduate qualification opens up a wide variety of career opportunities in the financial services industry, both in Ireland and abroad. From Galway to Singapore, from New York to London, financial services businesses such as banks, insurance companies, stockbrokers and investment funds, as well as government agencies, central banks and multinational corporations all put enormous value on the skills taught in this programme

Education to the highest international standards

The programme aims to deepen students’ understanding of the forces driving the global economy and the operations of international financial markets. The programme is designed to provide students with a rigorous analysis of the theory of international finance and the essential technical skills for using frontier methods of applied financial analysis. The programme offers students’ hands-on training of computer-based simulation models for both business analytics and the analysis of financial data.

J.E. Cairnes School of Business & Economics M. Econ. Sc International Finance Scholarship

Details of our merit Scholarships for the Masters in Economics programmes will be published in Spring 2021.  For more information on the scholarship application process, please contact business@nuigalway.ie

Who’s Suited to This Course

Learning Outcomes

 

Work Placement

Study Abroad

Related Student Organisations

Course Fees

Fees: EU

€10,000 p.a. 2021/22

Fees: Tuition

€9,776 p.a. 2021/22

Fees: Student levy

€224 p.a. 2021/22

Fees: Non EU

€17,400 p.a. 2021/22

Note to Non EU students: Learn about the 24 month Stayback Visa here


What Our Graduates Say

Antriksh

Antriksh Panwar |   Funds Officer at Alter Domus

Pursuing MEConSc (International Finance) at the National University of Ireland, Galway was an amazing learning experience for me. The Finance aspect of the curriculum was more inclined towards current industry requirements. It came in handy for me during FRM Level I exams as it touched base on some of the core readings of the FRM curriculum. The economics part focussed mainly on research and use of statistical tools. Throughout the year, we worked on several assignments, including a year-end dissertation that helped us groom these skills. The professors were easily approachable and helped us whenever it was required. I would highly recommend this course to anyone who desires to pursue PhD or wants to get into Financial Services.
in Connect with Antriksh
James

James McDonald |   Performance Analyst with Irish Life Investment Managers

The MEconSc will equip any student with the necessary soft & technical, both quantitative & qualitative skills required to succeed in a very competitive industry. A great feature of the MEconSc was the fact that you could deliver tutorials to students. This was genuinely a great experience as it turns the student who just intakes all the information provided to the lecturer who transfers the information in the easiest, most effective way to a large group of students. The MEconSc will challenge you as Semester 1 is very hands-on with group work & assignments so be willing to put your head down & give it your all, these skills & competencies that you develop throughout the Masters will stand to you as you progress to interview for some of the top companies in Ireland & abroad. I'm currently working for Irish Life Investment Managers (ILIM) where my current role is an Investment Analyst as part of the Performance team. Applied Portfolio Management was one of my favorite modules in the MEconSc & I regularly use the knowledge & skills I developed throughout this module in my day-to-day job.
Anthony Patrick

Anthony Patrick Saoud |   3M Data Analyst, Canada

The MEconSc (International Finance) at NUI Galway equipped me with advanced quantitative tools and techniques, which allowed me to standout and work in a competitive Fortune 500 company. The program exposed me to several fields in finance and quantitative research that enabled me to think outside the box and adapt to a variety of sectors.
Mohit

Mohit Agrawal |   ‎Ph.D. Candidate in Economics, Yale University

As a Master’s student in Economics, I was impressed by NUI Galway’s students, faculty, and facilities. The program size was small, allowing me to learn from and become friends with my fellow students in a collegial atmosphere. The faculty were fully dedicated to students, easy to talk to, and well-versed in their fields. Meanwhile, the facilities at NUI Galway were top-notch, with great computer labs, libraries, and social spaces. Lastly, I enjoyed living in Galway, with its historic city center and scenic seaside promenade; Galway was a perfect launching pad for trips across Ireland and Europe. During my time in Galway, I gained a unique understanding of economic policy in the context of Ireland and the Eurozone. I strongly encourage international students to consider study at NUI Galway.

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