Tuesday, 7 June 2005

Award-winning Galway writer, Ken Bruen is among a number of internationally acclaimed authors who will contribute to a conference on Memory in the Crime Genre, which will take place in the Information Technology Building, NUI Galway on 10th and 11th June, 2005. Ken Bruen, whose novels include The White Trilogy, 'Vixen', 'The Guards' and 'The Magdalen Martyrs', will give a public talk on his work at 6.00pm on Saturday 11 June in Room 125. Bruen, has published 11 books since leaving a career in teaching that brought him to South America, South East Asia, Africa and Japan. Crime Writer, Peter Tremayne will give a public lecture entitled "Sister Fidelma s World: Crime and Punishment in 7th Century Ireland," at 6.00pm on Friday 10th June again in Room 125. Sister Fidelma first appeared in short stories in 1993 and has gone on to enjoy critical acclaim. A Celtic scholar of note, Tremayne's other works include 'The Druids' and 'Dictionary of Celtic Mythology.' Dr Eamonn O Ciardha from the Keough Institute for Irish Studies, Notre Dame University, will open the conference with a keynote address on "The Irish Outlaw". The conference, hosted by NUI Galway's departments of French and Spanish, in association with the Centre for Irish Studies, has attracted delegates from Latin America, the USA, Australia and New Zealand, in addition to those from Britain and Ireland. Ends Information from: Kate Quinn, Dept of Spanish, NUI Galway on 091 492702 Phil Dine Dept of French, NUI Galway on 091 492391

Monday, 11 July 2005

Severe brain injury is the most serious outcome of many road traffic accidents. Having received medical treatment, it is vital for the patient to undergo an effective rehabilitation programme to ensure maximum recovery. However, as there is just one specialist rehabilitation centre in Ireland which is based in Dublin, most people have no option but to return home where they are dependent on their families for the rest of their lives. Professor Agnes Shiel of NUI Galway's Department of Occupational Therapy says that treatment facilities and a proper rehabilitation service should be available in Galway. She was speaking in advance of the Neuropsychological Rehabilitation Conference 2005 at NUI Galway (11th and 12th July), where international delegates addressed issues including neuropsychological or memory rehabilitation, cognitive rehabilitation and socio-emotional functioning. Professor Shiel said: "In Ireland, specialist rehabilitation of problems such as serious brain injury is wholly inadequate. There is only one specialist rehabilitation unit and this is based in Dublin. A successful rehabilitation programme needs to be accessible both in terms of starting as soon as possible after the injury is incurred and also in terms of location – that is - it needs to be regionally based so that the person's return to their community can be facilitated. A city the size of Galway should have a dedicated brain injury rehabilitation facility. " According to Professor Shiel, the average head injury survivor is male and aged between 15 and 25 years. While the numbers with physical difficulties are small (about 10% of the total), the vast majority have ongoing problems with memory, concentration, planning and paying attention. These difficulties mean that they may be unable to lead independent lives, work in open employment and resume their lives as before. Many return home and are dependent on their families for the rest of their lives. These problems are also experienced by people who incur brain injury from other causes, such as stroke, brain haemorrhage and tumours. This is creating a significant population of people living with ongoing severe difficulties. While people with brain injury may access local Occupational Therapy, Speech and Language Therapy, Physiotherapy and Neuropsychology services, these services are already stretched to capacity. It is estimated that there are approximately 150 people per 100,000 in the UK who have ongoing difficulties as a result of brain injury. Professor Shiel says that accurate figures for the Irish population are not available but are possibly higher because of the higher number of road traffic accidents. However, survival rates after head injury are increasing she says. This is mainly due to car safety features such as airbags, improvement in acute and intensive care and advances in pharmacological treatment of secondary complications. "However, the increased survival rates mean that there is an ever-increasing population of people who survive with significant and debilitating problems. Many survivors of head injury never access a rehabilitation programme and cope as best they can with the help of family and friends." Among those addressing the Neuropsychological Rehabilitation Conference in NUI Galway was Professor Barbara Wilson OBE from Cambridge who helped establish one of the first centres in the UK for memory rehabilitation. Professor Skye McDonald from Sydney discussed emotional difficulties experienced by people suffering from brain injury who are unable to respond to non-verbal communication, while Professor Nadina Lincoln from the University of Nottingham compared different types of rehabilitation pointing out the most effective. Ends

Monday, 11 July 2005

Nicholas Canny, Professor of History and Academic Director of the Centre for the Study of Human Settlement and Historical Change at NUI Galway, has been accorded the exceptional accolade of being elected as a Corresponding Fellow of the British Academy at the annual meeting of the Academy on 7 July 2005. According to the Academy, this is the 'highest honour that the Academy is able to confer in recognition of scholarly distinction'. It is awarded each year to only seven scholars from all subjects in the humanities who may be chosen from any country in the world except the United Kingdom. Professor Canny is only the second living scholar resident in the Republic of Ireland who has been honoured in this way. In the citation recommending Professor Canny for election, reference was made first to his consistent record of scholarly publications spanning thirty years and including two prize winning books, the most recent Making Ireland British, 1580-1650 (Oxford University Press, 2001); and The Elizabethan Conquest of Ireland, (Harvester Press, 1976); then to his outstanding career as a teacher of History at undergraduate and post-graduate levels; and finally to his leadership role in promoting multi-disciplinary research in the Humanities in Ireland and abroad. Particular mention was made of his leadership role at NUI Galway that led to the establishment of the Centre for the Study of Human Settlement and Historical Change. This Centre, created by the Higher Education Authority under its Programme for Research in Third Level Institutions has recently completed its first major research programme to the highest international standard. The Centre facilitates multi-disciplinary and co-operative research on topics related to the histories of human migration, settlement and cultural change. The Centre has forged strong collaborative links with other national and international institutions, including Harvard University, Johns Hopkins University, the Institute for Migration and Ethnic Studies Zagreb, Croatia and the Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study in the Social Sciences, Uppsala. Congratulating Professor Canny on his success, Dr Iognáid Ó Muircheartaigh, President of NUI Galway said: "This is a great honour for an outstanding historian. Through his own research and the leadership he has shown in the Centre for the Study of Human Settlement and Historical Change, Professor Canny has demonstrated the highest standards of scholarship and academic excellence we are so proud to have at NUI Galway." Ends

Friday, 8 July 2005

This year two NUI Galway crews made the final of Henley Royal Regatta. The crew of John Forde, Marc Stevens, Paul Giblin and Dave Mannion raced in the Visitors Challenge Cup. They easily qualified for the quarter final, but encountered stiff opposition from Molsey Rowing Club in the semi-final. Having defeated Molsey, NUI Galway progressed to the final against a strong Oxford Brookes crew stroked by an Irish man, Derek Holland. The final took place on Sunday in front of a packed stadium. NUI Galway stormed into a strong lead which they maintained throughout the race, winning the coveted Visitors Challenge Cup. A very young and inexperienced crew of James Wall, Steve Keyes, Paul Murray and Evin Donelly raced in the Student Coxed Fours Challenge Cup. They were led by Ruadhan Cooke who coxed several Henley and Irish Championship winning crews. The most exciting race of the event and arguably the regatta was their semi final against tipped favourites, Imperial College London and Goldsmith College. The Imperial crew had a very strong first half, taking up a length lead. The NUI Galway students fought back and in a sprint for the line won by an official verdict of one foot. However, in the final, the Galway crew was pipped at the line by Durham University, who on the way to winning the event, broke all the course records. Ends

Friday, 1 July 2005

An international conference on Feminisms Within and Without,' organised by the Women's Studies Centre at NUI Galway, will take place from Thursday 7th to Saturday 9th July 2005 in the Arts Millennium Building. Many of the papers to be presented reflect debates central to contemporary feminist politics and Women's Studies, such as the distinction between education and activism, and theory and practice, as well as the many and varied feminist frameworks within which women's work – paid and unpaid – can be analysed. Delegates from Ireland, Europe, the United States, Canada, Australia and New Zealand will present papers on many different areas of the social, political, academic and creative aspects of Women's, Feminist and Gender Studies. The conference provides an opportunity to bring together experts in these fields, as well as from related disciplines, to exchange ideas and information. The international thrust of the conference is reflected in the extensive range of papers being presented, which include "The evolution of Spanish Feminism", "A Critical Look at New Zealand's Gender-based Art Environment," and "The Sufism of Ibn' Arabi." The Irish dimension includes papers on "Republican Women TDs in Early Twentieth Century Ireland," and "Fetal Imaging and the Creation of Knowledge." There are also papers on topics such as ethics in medicine/nursing, feminist child-rearing, and masculinity studies. An opening plenary panel, made up of Ailbhe Smyth (Ireland), Katharine Side (Canada) and Sandra Krajewski (USA) will address various aspects of feminist politics in Ireland and beyond. Guest speaker for the conference is film director, Mystelle Barbée, whose film 'Highway Courtesans' will be shown as part of the conference, in conjunction with the Galway Film Fleadh. The conference will also include a sean-nós performance workshop, and a feminist writing for performance workshop. Sessional fees are available for half- or full-day attendance. Details of the programme and conference events are available on www.conference.ie Ends

Wednesday, 31 August 2005

- New €2.6 million centre will give Ireland a supercomputing capability- Researchers at eight Irish third level institutes today (August 29th 2005) announced that Ireland's first supercomputing centre – the Irish Centre for High End Computing, (ICHEC) will commence operation on Thursday, 1st September 2005. The centre, which will deliver a national research infrastructure, has been funded through a €2.6 million Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) grant, a €0.7M equipment loan from the HEA PRTLI funded CosmoGrid programme and an equipment loan of €1.2M from TCD's HEA PRTLI funded IITAC programme. When completed, ICHEC, will address the growing need for computational resources to assist Irish researchers in their work in disciplines as diverse as medical device simulation, marine modelling, bio-informatics, drug discovery, astrophysics and computational chemistry. High End Computing, also known as 'super computing', uses the most advanced aspects of modern computer science to produce supercomputers capable of many trillions of calculations per second. With this power many physical problems can be simulated on the computer – in silica. For example it is possible in silica to determine how a surgical implant such as a stent will fatigue during its lifetime. Doing this on a computer has clear benefits over measuring the fatigue after it has been put into a patient. The development of the centre is the first of a three-phase project with the objective of ensuring that Ireland is a leader in high end computing on a per capita basis by 2010. It is expected that the centre will be a major power house for the knowledge based economy, benefiting Universities, SMEs – through its technology transfer work – and multi nationals. Commenting on the importance of the project, Dr Andrew Shearer, Dept of Information Technology, NUI Galway and Director of ICHEC said, "Ireland's ability to compete for international science projects has been hindered by the lack of computational resources, with no machines in the country making the world's Top 500 Supercomputers list. This centre will transform computational science in Ireland, creating facilities, which will be on a par with those in the rest of Europe. "Computational science is one of the few areas where Ireland can contribute to 'big' science projects. In the future, we intend that Ireland will be a Centre of Excellence in High End Computing. The ICHEC will also be of immense importance in economic terms, by keeping Ireland competitive and attracting high tech industries to the country. As high end computing can answer almost any question that a researcher in academia or industry would want to ask, the benefits of the ICHEC are endless," he says. Prof. Luke Drury, Director of CosmoGrid said "The CosmoGrid project is delighted to be part of this exciting development which will significantly enhance our ability to deliver grid-enabled computation as a tool for Irish researchers." As well as aiding Irish academic research another important aspect of the new centre will be its role in embedding advanced computing methodology into Irish research and through spin off and collaboration, to transfer advanced computing technology and expertise to the Irish economy. The Irish Centre for High End Computing involves eight partner institutions; NUI Galway, Trinity College, Dublin, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies (DIAS), UCD, UCC, NUI Maynooth, Dublin City University and the Tyndall Institute. ICHEC will also have an industrial outreach programme working with those researchers and industries that do not normally have an interest in super computing. In addition, an outreach programme will be developed to encourage second-level students to develop an interest in computational science. Ends

Monday, 29 August 2005

A major international conference entitled "Enhancing Individual, Family and Community Health" will be held in NUI Galway from the 31st August to 3rd September 2005. The European Health Psychology Conference 2005, which will be attended by 620 delegates from 34 countries, brings together a range of academics, healthcare professionals and organisational psychologists who will present cutting edge research on a wide variety of topics, which are impacting health and the quality of family life in society. The diverse range of topics to be discussed include the stress of illness; sexual health; perceptions, attitudes and the experience of aging; quality of life following childhood illness; coping with cancer and chronic pain; influences of exercise and physical activity; and public attitudes towards advances in genetic technology. Professor Shelley Taylor, UCLA will deliver a keynote address on Wednesday on 'Why people tend and befriend under stress', which will address the importance and source of social support for those suffering illness or stress. For many people suffering severe stress or trauma, expressing their feelings through writing has proved both therapeutic and life-enhancing. Professor James Pennebaker, University of Texas, who has carried out extensive research in this field, will deliver a keynote address on Thursday, entitled ''Two decades of expressive writing and health.' Commenting on the conference Professor Ruth Curtis, Conference President and member of Dept of Psychology, NUI Galway, said, "We are very honoured to host this prestigious conference, which recognises the outstanding contribution that the Department of Psychology at NUI Galway has made to health psychology in Ireland. "This conference brings together many of the leaders in this field and recognises the importance of health psychology in helping us to explore and understand how we cope with and manage the impact that an ever changing society is having on people's lives. "We have a duty to ensure that policy makers understand the important role that health psychology plays in preparing strategies for the development of health services in Ireland. It is vital that the Government recognises this important role in the future and provides funded training places to enable graduates to specialise in health psychology." Health psychology can play an important role in significant health promotion initiatives such as the introduction of the smoking ban in Ireland. NUI Galway was the first university in Ireland to introduce a professional training programme in Health Psychology. -ends-

Monday, 22 August 2005

The amazing diversity of bats, of which there are 10 species native to Ireland, is the focus of a week-long conference at NUI Galway (22nd – 26th August). Over 200 scientists from 40 countries are attending the 10th European Bat Research Symposium where they will dispel myths regarding the blindness of these nocturnal creatures and explain the important role bats play in agriculture. NUI Galway's long involvement in bat research, first initiated by Professor James Fairley in the early 1980s, led to the University being chosen as the venue for the conference's first visit to Ireland. A keynote address delivered by Professor Thomas Kunz, Professor of Biology at Boston University, will focus on the role bats play in controlling agricultural pests. For example, the local bat population of the Brazilian Free Tailed Bat species in south central Texas may exceed 100 million each night. These bats disperse over varied landscapes to feed on flying insects. Some of their prey includes crop pests such as the corn earworm and the cotton hole worm. Dr James Dunne of NUI Galway's Department of Zoology explained how beneficial the creatures are in controlling Ireland's insect population. "The small bat seen first at dusk, weaving around and over trees is the Pipistrelle. This is the most common bat in Ireland and feeds mainly on midges, mosquitoes, caddis flies and crane flies. A pipistrelle may eat 3,000 small insects in a single night. A roost of 100 can account for the annihilation of many millions of harmful insects over a summer," he said. Dr Dunne also put paid to some of the more popular misconceptions about the common bat. "Despite several myths, bats are not blind, they do not entangle themselves in people's hair and the species native to Ireland, do not spread disease." Other areas to be explored throughout the week-long symposium include research which sheds light on the eating habits of bats. Although the vast majority of bats feed on insects, research by scientists in the Basque region has shown that the long-fingered bat is capable of also feeding on free swimming fish by plunging onto the water surface and grasping them with their hind feet. The Lesser Horseshoe Bat is one of Europe's rarer species and is the subject of a number of papers to be delivered at the conference. Sinead Biggane, a researcher with the Department of Zoology at NUI Galway, has been part of a team who have been studying a maternity roost in County Clare for many years. Using radio transmitters, Sinead tracked individual bats to determine their main feeding areas and pattern of feeding. She shows that the bats use mixed woodland, riparian woodland and associated habitats for foraging. They use hedgerows and stone walls to commute to their feeding areas and will not cover large open spaces. This research has important implications for the conservation of bats. The economic boom throughout Europe has resulted in the destruction of many bat inhabited old buildings. The conference will include a special workshop which will deal with the problems associated with this growing trend and also the legal obligations under European law to protect bats and their habitats will be discussed.

Monday, 15 August 2005

Reachtálfaidh Acadamh na hOllscolaíochta Gaeilge, acadamh de chuid OÉ Gaillimh, sraith agallamh ar an Aoine, 19 Lúnasa do dhaoine atá ag iarraidh tabhairt faoi chúrsa i scileanna raidió. Beidh na hagallaimh seo ag teacht sna sála ar thorthaí na hArdteiste a fhoilseofar an tseachtain seo. Cúrsa bliana lánaimseartha is ea an Dioplóma i Scileanna Raidió a bheas ar bun in ionad an Acadaimh ar an gCeathrú Rua i gConamara. Is é seo an dara bliain ina bhfuil sé ar siúl. Cuimsíonn sé raon leathan ábhar, ón iriseoireacht go scileanna craoltóireachta, léiriú agus iarléiriú fuaime agus raidió, cúrsaí eitice agus dlí agus scileanna cumarsáide pearsanta. Tá tréimhse taithí oibre ceithre sheachtaine mar chuid den chúrsa. D'oibrigh mic léinn an cúrsa le RTÉ Raidió na Gaeltachta, RTÉ Lyric FM agus BBC Thuaisceart Éireann roimhe seo agus tugadh cuireadh do chuid acu leanúint lena gcuid oibre ann. Dar le roinnt de na mic léinn ar chúrsa na bliana seo, "oscailt súl" ar thionscal na meán ab ea an cúrsa. Tá gné den iriseoireacht chlóite mar chuid de, agus chuir mic léinn na bliana seo caite forlíonadh le chéile a foilsíodh sa nuachtán Foinse. Bhí Pádraig Ó Duithche as Corr na Móna i measc na ndaoine ar an gcéad chúrsa. "Cheap mé, cosúil le go leor daoine, nach raibh tada ann ach a ghabháil chuig an micreafón. Ach tá an t-uafás ag baint leis. D'fhoghlaim mé conas thú féin a chur i láthair agus go gcaithfidh tú tú féin a chur ar an eolas faoin ábhar a bhfuil tú ag caint faoi, má tá tú beo ar an aer ag caint," a dúirt sé. Chaith Cathal Mac Gearailt ceithre sheachtaine ar thaithí oibre le RTÉ Raidió na Gaeltachta i gCiarraí. "Tá mé ag déanamh rudaí difriúla gach aon lá. Tá mé ag déanamh na nuachta, tá mé ag déanamh na bhfógraí agus tá mé ag déanamh na fuaime agus rudaí mar sin," a dúirt sé. Is iad na hiriseoirí Norita Ní Chartúir agus Uinsionn Mac Dubhghaill na príomhtheagascóirí ar an gcúrsa. Tá taithí na mblianta ag Norita Ní Chartúir mar chraoltóir le RTÉ Raidió na Gaeltachta agus tá taithí ag Uinsionn Mac Dubhghaill mar Eagarthóir Gaeilge an Irish Times, agus mar iriseoir le Nuacht TG4 agus le heagrais eile. Cuirtear béim mhór ar scileanna praiticiúla le linn an chúrsa, agus é mar aidhm aige na rannpháirtithe a réiteach chun fostaíocht a bhaint amach in earnáil an raidió, bíodh sin os comhair an mhaidhc mar láithreoir nó taobh thiar den deasc fuaime mar theicneoir nó mar léiritheoir. Tháinig forbairt mhór ar na deiseanna fostaíochta atá ar fáil do dhaoine in earnáil na cumarsáide Gaeilge le blianta beaga anuas. Bíonn éileamh mór ar dhaoine a bhfuil na scileanna cuí craoltóireachta, teicniúla agus fuaime acu, ag eagraíochtaí ar nós RTÉ Raidió na Gaeltachta, stáisiúin raidió eile, TG4, Telegael, Abú Media agus neart comhlachtaí eile. Ar an iomlán bíonn os cionn 40 stáisiún raidió ag craoladh in Éirinn agus deiseanna éagsúla oibre ar fáil do lucht an chúrsa dá réir. De bharr tacaíocht fhlaithiúil Údarás na Gaeltachta ní bhíonn táille ar an gcúrsa agus íocann an tÚdarás liúntas seachtainiúil do rannpháirtithe. Cuirfear tús leis an Dioplóma i Scileanna Raidió ar an 12 Lúnasa 2005 agus é faoi réir ag Acadamh na hOllscolaíochta Gaeilge ar an gCeathrú Rua, Co. na Gaillimhe.

Monday, 15 August 2005

Interviews to allocate the remaining places on a radio skills course, offered by NUI Galway's Irish language institute, Acadamh na hOllscolaíochta Gaeilge, are to be held on Friday, 19th August 2005, following the publication of this year's Leaving Certificate results. The one-year, full-time Dioplóma i Scileanna Raidió course, now is its second year, is based at the institute's centre in An Cheathrú Rua, Connemara. Covering a broad range of subjects including journalism, broadcast skills, sound production, post-production, ethics, law and communication skills, the course includes a four-week work placement. Previous students have worked at RTE Lyric FM, Raidió na Gaeltachta and BBC Northern Ireland where some have been offered further employment. Described by several students as "an eye opener" to the media industry, the course includes an element of print journalism which last year saw students complete a supplement that was published in Foinse. Pádraig Ó Duithche from Corr na Móna, who was among the first group to study the course. "I thought, like many people, that all that was involved in the course was sitting behind a microphone. I learned that you have to present yourself and you have to inform yourself about the subject that you are going to talk about because you talk live on air," he said. Cathal Mac Gearailt, who completed his work experience with Raidió na Gaeltachta in Kerry, said he would recommend the course to anyone. "I am doing different things every day. One day I will be presenting a programme, the next I will be working the sound desk and doing different things in the studio," he said. Course tutors include Norita Ní Chartúir, an experienced journalist who has worked with Raidió na Gaeltachta, and Uinsionn Mac Dubhghaill, a former Irish language editor of the Irish Times who has also worked as a journalist with Nuacht TG4. With a strong emphasis on practical skills, the course is geared towards preparing participants for a career in radio, either in front of the microphone as a presenter or behind the sound desk as a technician or producer. Opportunities in the Irish language media have expanded greatly in recent years with the advent of TG4 where sound, presentation and technical skills are much in demand. And with over 40 radio stations on air across the country there are several career options available to graduates of the course. Course fees will be paid and participants will receive a weekly training allowance from Údarás na Gaeltachta. The Dioplóma i Scileanna Raidió begins on 12th September 2005 and is offered by Acadamh na hOllscolaíochta Gaeilge in An Cheathrú Rua, Co. na Gaillimhe.

Thursday, 11 August 2005

Dr Jane Conroy, senior lecturer at the Department of French, NUI Galway, has become the first woman and first native English speaker to be awarded the prestigious Académie Francaise prize for scholarly work in French. Dr Conroy has been honoured with the Grand Prix de la Francophonie de L'Académie Française for her research into intercultural interactions, real and imaginary, between France and other countries, especially Ireland and Britain. This is the first time since its foundation in 1986 that the award, worth €22,500, has been awarded to someone from Ireland, the UK or the US. Dr Conroy was nominated by the French academician Michel Déon, who lives in Galway and was impressed by her pioneering work on 17th century French theatre and literature, written by French travellers to Ireland between the 17th and 19th centuries. During the 17th century, many French plays were set in the UK, a fact that went largely unnoticed until Dr Conroy wrote and published her book in French Tragic Lands: England and Scotland in 17th Century French Tragedy (Gunter Naar, 1999). This award recognises that and other publications by Dr Conroy in French. A native of Rosmuc, Connemara, Dr Conroy is humanities secretary for the Royal Irish Academy and is one of a team of editors of the Irish Journal of French Studies. She will receive her award in a special ceremony at the Institute de France in Paris in December. Dr Conroy is currently in Paris where she is preparing an edition of the 18th century manuscript travel diaries of Charles-Etienne Coquebert de Montbret, written during his time as French consul in Dublin during the reign of Louis XVI. The document will be published in French by the Irish Manuscript Commission but an English version will be made available to university libraries by Dr Conroy. Several of Dr Conroy's colleagues from the Department of French are also spending the summer in Paris where they are conducting research of a very high standard. The relationship with NUI Galway and several of the most respected French institutions in this regard reflects the quality of the research work and the affinity between the two countries.

Thursday, 4 August 2005

The Governing Authority of NUI Galway today (Thursday August 4th 2005) announced the appointment of Professor Roy Green as Vice-President for Research. The Dean of the University's Faculty of Commerce was appointed for a four-year term of office following a meeting of Údarás na hOllscoile/Governing Authority. The newly established post underpins NUI Galway's commitment to further strengthening the research reputation and ethos of the University. As Vice President for Research, Professor Green will create the structures necessary to ensure that NUI Galway will remain at the forefront of internationally acknowledged research excellence. Specifically, Professor Green will ensure that the University will build on previous successes in attracting competitive research funding, will support and develop opportunities for researchers across all faculties and will also ensure the University's contribution to Ireland's knowledge society by protecting intellectual property through a newly-established Technology Transfer Office. Congratulating Professor Green on his appointment, the President of NUI Galway, Dr Iognáid Ó Muircheartaigh said, "We are very pleased to announce that Professor Green, an outstanding scholar, with an established corpus of professional and personal achievement in research, will continue to lead and develop our research reputation. Professor Green is a very capable individual and under his stewardship, we look forward to ensuring that our internationally acknowledged strengths of excellence in research will continue to grow and prosper." Professor Green is internationally recognised in the fields of innovation studies, industry and labour, market analysis and economic theory. He is currently involved in a study of the ICT sector in Ireland and a research project on structural reform and the knowledge-based economy in Europe. He has contributed to the OECD National Innovation Systems Programme and is on the steering group of the Atlantic Technology Corridor. He is a member of the Irish Research Council of the Humanities and Social Sciences, a member of Enterprise Ireland's National Research Funding Board and is current Chair of the Irish Academy of Management. Professor Green joined NUI Galway in February 2000 as Professor of Management. He was the foundation Director of the Centre for Innovation and Structural Change (CISC), established in NUI Galway in 2002 with funding of €2.8 million under the Irish Government's Programme for Research in Third Level Institutions (PRTLI). He was previously with the University of Newcastle, Australia, where he was Director of the Employment Studies Centre. A Fellow of Clare Hall, Cambridge, he has also played a key role as adviser to Government and Business. NUI Galway has enjoyed remarkable success in recent years in securing some 100m Euro in competitive funding from the Higher Education Authority's Programme for Research in Third Level Institutions (PRTLI) and from Science Foundation Ireland. Ends

Thursday, 4 August 2005

D'fhógair Údarás Ollscoil na hÉireann, Gaillimh inniu (Déardaoin, 4 Lúnasa) go bhfuil an tOllamh Roy Green ceaptha mar Leas-Uachtarán um Thaighde. Ceapadh an fear a bhí ina Dhéan ar Dhámh Tráchtála na hOllscoile ar feadh ceithre bliana ag cruinniú d'Údarás na hOllscoile. Cuireann an post nuabhunaithe béim ar chomh dáiríre is atá Ollscoil na hÉireann, Gaillimh maidir le cáil taighde agus éiteas na hOllscoile a láidriú. Mar Leas-Uachtarán um Thaighde, cruthóidh an tOllamh Green na struchtúir chuí le cinntiú go bhfanfaidh Ollscoil na hÉireann, Gaillimh chun tosaigh i sárthaighde idirnáisiúnta. Cinnteoidh an tOllamh Green go dtógfaidh an Ollscoil ar a cumas maoiniú taighde a aimsiú, cuirfidh sé tacaíocht ar fáil agus forbróidh sé deiseanna do thaighdeoirí as na dámha uile agus deimhneoidh sé freisin inchur na hOllscoile i sochaí eolais na hÉireann, trí mhaoin intleachtúil a chosaint tríd an Oifig um Aistriú Teicneolaíochta nuabhunaithe. Agus é ag déanamh comhghairdis leis an Ollamh Green, dúirt an Dr Iognáid Ó Muircheartaigh, Uachtarán OÉ, Gaillimh, an méid seo: "Tá áthas orainn a fhógairt go leanfaidh an tOllamh Green air, scoláire den chéad scoth, a bhfuil cáil bainte amach aige as a chuid taighde, ag stiúradh agus ag forbairt ár gcáil taighde. Duine fíorchumasach é an tOllamh Green agus faoina cheannaireacht, táimíd ag súil go gcinnteofar go dtiocfaidh fás agus forbairt ar na réimsí taighde sin a bhfuil clú idirnáisiúnta tuilte againn mar gheall orthu." Tá cáil idirnáisiúnta ar an Ollamh Green mar gheall ar a chuid taighde i réimse an staidéir nuálaíochta, tionscail agus saothar, anailís ar an margadh agus teoiric eacnamaíoch. Tá sé ag obair ar staidéar don earnáil ICT in Éirinn faoi láthair agus ar thionscadal taighde maidir le hathchóiriú struchtúrtha agus geilleagar eolasbhunaithe na hEorpa. Tá obair déanta aige ar Chlár Náisiúnta Chórais Nuálaíochta de chuid an OECD agus ar ghrúpa stiúrtha do Dhorchla Teicneolaíochta an Atlantaigh. Ar lean/ Tá an tOllamh Green ina chomhalta den Chomhairle um Thaighde sna Dána agus sna hEolaíochtaí Sóisialta, den Bhord Maoiniúcháin Náisiúnta Taighde de chuid Fiontraíocht Éireann; agus tá sé ina Chathaoirleach faoi láthair ar Acadamh Bainistíochta na hÉireann. Thosaigh Roy Green ina phost mar Ollamh Bainistíochta in OÉ, Gaillimh i Feabhra 2000. Ba é an chéad Stiúrthóir ar an Ionad um Nuálaíocht agus Athrú Struchtúrach (CISC), a bunaíodh in OÉ, Gaillimh in 2002 le maoiniú €2.8 milliún faoi Chlár Rialtas Éireann um Thaighde i bhForais Tríú Leibhéal (PRTLI). Roimhe sin, bhí sé in Ollscoil Newcastle, san Astráil, áit a raibh sé ina Stiúrthóir ar Ionad Staidéar na Fostaíochta. Bhí sé ina Ánra de Clare Hall, Cambridge, agus ina chomhairleoir Rialtais agus Gnó. Tá éirithe thar barr le hOllscoil na hÉireann, Gaillimh le blianta beaga anuas ag aimsiú thart ar 100m Euro san iomaíocht maoiniú don taighde trí Chlár Taighde an Údaráis um Ard-Oideachas in Institiúidí Tríú Leibhéal (PRTLI) agus trí Fhondúireacht Eolaíochta Éireann a fháil. Críoch

Monday, 26 September 2005

The Huston School of Film & Digital Media, NUI Galway. 29th September-2nd October 2005 In 1996, it was voted the most popular Irish film of all time by Irish Times readers and continues to fascinate people. When it was released on video in 1985, it sold 200,000 copies in Britain alone within four years. The John Ford classic film The Quiet Man continues to fascinate and enthral audiences, making it a cult movie like others such as Gone with the Wind and Ryan's Daughter. However, some people regard it as idealistic, nostalgic and containing more than its fair share of paddywhackery. A modern viewing of The Quiet Man provides much food for thought and from the 29th September – 2 October a conference entitled "New perspectives on The Quiet Man" will be hosted by the Huston School of Film & Digital Media at NUI Galway. The event involves both the analysis of aspects of The Quiet Man as myth, commodity and fetish and the celebration of a film that has sustained such enthusiastic attention and popular appreciation for 50 years. Among the topics considered will be the complexity of the film's relation to Ireland and to John Ford s other films; its perceived place with regard to indigenous Irish cinema; and the phenomenon of its circulation and reception as a cult film over the years. As Rod Stoneman, Director of the Huston School of Film & Digital Media at NUI Galway has remarked: " The Quiet Man is a pivotal film in Irish culture, a film that has achieved cult status long ago and been much debated in recent years. John Ford s classic film offered an image of Ireland that has circulated internationally and still brings many tourists to these shores. It is especially appropriate to be staging the conference amid the locations of the film's original shooting in 1951." Among the contributors to the conference will be some leading international academics, including Professor Luke Gibbons (Keough Family Chair of Irish Studies, University of Notre Dame), Dr. Ruth Barton (University College, Dublin), Dr. Richard C. Allen (University of Sunderland, UK), and Dr. Michael Gillespie (Louise Edna Goeden Professor of English, Marquette University, Wisconsin, USA). Luke Gibbons, the author of a book on the film, will examine The Quiet Man with regard to John Ford's westerns. Ruth Barton argues that we need to read the character of Mary Kate in The Quiet Man against the background of Maureen O Hara as the star of a series of films previous to The Quiet Man that saw her wield a sword, ride horseback across the desert and make love to pirates of dubious reputation, in films such as The Spanish Main and Sinbad the Sailor, and not exclusively as a fantasised representation of Irish femininity. Richard C. Allen, in a paper entitled " 'I've come home, and home I'm gonna stay': The Quiet Man in Irish-American cinematic history," argues that while the film is fictional and stereotypical, it offers some powerful insights into the experience of exile and homecoming. Indeed, as a vehicle for exploring issues such as emigration and exile; landownership; the subordination of women; and the controlling influence of the Catholic Church, Allen argues that this tragic-comedy allows the audience to engage at a high level with the emotional turbulence of the exile's condition. Michael Gillespie will present the provocatively titled paper 'Is Californication a Mortal Sin?' in which he argues that The Quiet Man, despite its being made along conventional Hollywood lines, is an Irish film and as such provides insights into what features legitimately define that category. A full programme of conference papers and screenings is available from the Huston School. There will also be screenings of a special 35mm print of The Quiet Man brought in from an archive in Los Angeles, and related films and visits to the locations in Connemara where the film was made. The Quiet Man screening, to be held in the Town Hall on Saturday (October 1st) at 4pm, will also be preceded by a Q&A with the acclaimed Irish playwright and screenwriter, Hugh Leonard. The fee for this screening is €6/€4. The conference is one of an ongoing series of events at the Huston School including conferences on 'New Scottish Cinema' on November 4th - 5th and 'Women in the Picture 2' next January.

Monday, 26 September 2005

A valuable collection of personal letters and other material belonging to a close friend of Douglas Hyde, An Craobhín Aoibhinn, eminent Gaelic scholar and first President of Ireland, has been presented to NUI Galway. The collection has come from the family of Tom Morrisroe who was born and raised in Ratra, near Frenchpark, Co Roscommon, close to the home of Dr Douglas Hyde. A strong friendship developed between the two men, which lasted throughout their lives, maintained by regular correspondence. The Hyde papers presented include family photographs showing Tom Morrisroe fishing and socialising with the Hyde family, indicating a close social relationship. The Morrisroe-Hyde papers include an extensive collection of letters in Irish from Douglas Hyde, who had taught Irish to Morrisroe, as well as material relating to Hyde's visit to the US to fundraise for the revival of the Irish language. The papers will join Lamhscribhinní de hÍde, 120 manuscripts gathered by Dr Hyde during the course of his folklore studies and other related material already held in the archives of the James Hardiman Library, NUI Galway. Tom Morrisroe joined An Garda Síochána and served in Mayo and later was stationed in Galway as Garda Sergeant until his death in a car accident in 1954. His daughters, Evelyn Morrisroe Connolly and Sr Bernadine (Breege) Morrisroe, were born and spent their early childhood on what is now the NUI Galway campus at Morrisroe House, current home to the University's Department of Philosophy. Evelyn now lives in Westchester, New York and Sr Bernadine is based in the Convent of Mercy, Dunmore, Co Galway. Speaking at the presentation of the Hyde papers to NUI Galway, Evelyn Morrisroe-Connolly said: I am so happy that these precious documents, which have been in my family's possession for more than fifty years have finally found a suitable home in the James Hardiman Library, which is not a stone's throw from where my sister and I played as children. My father and his beloved friend, 'An Craobhín Aoibhinn', enjoyed a life-long friendship which is reflected in the many letters written to my father from both Hyde's home in Frenchpark and Áras an Uachtaráin. Dr Iognáid Ó Muircheartaigh, President of NUI Galway said: The presentation of the Morrisroe-Hyde papers renews the long-standing relationship of the Morrisroe family with NUI Galway. On behalf of the entire University community, I thank the Morrisroe family, and Evelyn Morrisroe Connolly in particular, for presenting these important Hyde papers to the James Hardiman Library. This donation will substantially enrich our Library's holdings relating to Douglas Hyde and the early years of the Irish language revival. Marie Reddan, Librarian, James Hardiman Library, NUI Galway said; We are delighted to receive this significant collection of historical correspondence which will complement existing material, including manuscripts the Library holds relating to Douglas Hyde. The Morrisroe-Hyde papers are an important primary resource for research into the social, cultural and political history of Ireland in the late nineteenth century.

Monday, 26 September 2005

Tá bailiúchán litreacha pearsanta agus ábhar eile le dlúthchara le Dubhghlas de hÍde, An Craobhín Aoibhinn, scoláire Gaeilge mór le rá agus céad Uachtarán na hÉireann, bronnta ar OÉ, Gaillimh. Ó theaghlach Tom Morrisroe, a rugadh agus a tógadh i Ratra, gar do Dhún Gar, Co. Ros Comáin, in aice le baile an Dr Dubhghlas de hÍde a tháinig an bailiúchán. Bhí dlúthchairdeas idir an bheirt ar feadh a saoil agus bhídís i dteagmháil lena chéile go rialta. I measc pháipéir de hÍde a bronnadh tá grianghraif de Tom Morrisroe agus é ag iascach agus ag sóisialú le teaghlach de hÍde, rud a léiríonn an dlúthchairdeas a bhí eatarthu. I measc pháipéirí Morrisroe-de hÍde tá bailiúchán nach beag litreacha Gaeilge ó Dhubhghlas de hÍde, a mhúin an Ghaeilge do Morrisroe, mar aon le hábhair eile a bhaineann le cuairt de hÍde ar Stáit Aontaithe Mheiriceá agus é i mbun feachtas bailithe airgid d athbheochan na Gaeilge. Beidh na páipéir mar chuid de bhailiúchán lámhscríbhinní agus ábhar eile le de hÍde atá i gcartlann Leabharlann Shéamais Uí Argadáin, OÉ, Gaillimh, cheana féin. Bhí Tom Morrisroe ina Gharda Síochána i Maigh Eo agus ina Sháirsint i nGaillimh go dtí gur cailleadh i dtimpiste cairr i 1954 é. Rugadh a iníonacha, Evelyn Morrisroe Connolly agus Sr Bernadine (Breege) Morrisroe, agus chaith siad cuid mhaith dá n-óige san áit a bhfuil campas OÉ, Gaillimh lonnaithe anois. Roinn Fealsúnachta na hOllscoile atá i dTeach Morrisroe anois. Ag labhairt di ag bronnadh pháipéir de hÍde ar OÉ, Gaillimh, is é a dúirt Evelyn Morrisroe-Connolly: Táim an-sásta go bhfuil baile oiriúnach bainte amach ag na cáipéisí luachmhara seo, atá sa teaghlach seo againne le breis is caoga bliain anois. Níl Leabharlann Shéamais Uí Argadáin ach coiscéim coiligh ón áit a mbíodh mo dheirfiúr agus mé féin ag súgradh le linn ár n-óige. Dlúthchairde ar feadh a saoil ba ea m'athair agus 'An Craobhín Aoibhinn' agus tá sé sin le sonrú sna litreacha a scríodh chuig m'athair le linn do de hÍde a bheith i nDún Gar agus in Áras an Uachtaráin. Dúirt an Dr Iognáid Ó Muircheartaigh, Uachtarán OÉ, Gaillimh, an méid seo: Le bronnadh pháipéir Morrisroe-de hÍde tá athnuachan á déanamh ar an gcaidreamh fada atá ag teaghlach Morrisroe le hOÉ, Gaillimh. Thar ceann phobal na hOllscoile ar fad, glabhaim buíochas le teaghlach Morrisroe, agus le Evelyn Morrisroe Connolly go háirithe, as na páipéir thábhachtacha seo de chuid de hÍde a bhronnadh ar Leabharlann Shéamais Uí Argadáin. Cuirfidh an tabhartas seo go mór le saibhreas ábhair na Leabharlainne a bhaineann le Dubhghlas de hÍde agus leis na blianta tosaigh d'athbheochan na Gaeilge. Is é a dúirt Marie Reddan, an Leabharlannaí, Leabharlann Shéamais Uí Argadáin, OÉ, Gaillimh: Is mór an chúis áthais dúinne an bailiúchán tábhachtach seo de chomhfhreagras stairiúil a fháil agus cuirfidh sé go mór leis an ábhar atá againn cheana féin, lena n-áirítear lámhscríbhinní, a bhaineann le Dubhghlas de hÍde. Is foinse bhunaidh thábhachtach iad páipéir Morrisroe-de hÍde do thaighde ar stair shóisialta, chultúir agus pholaitiúil na hÉireann ag deireadh an naoú céad déag.

Friday, 16 September 2005

Academic programmes will be language-centred, knowledge-based History was made in Gaoth Dobhair today (Friday 16 September), when the €5m NUI Galway Gaoth Dobhair campus, Acadamh na hOllscolaíochta Gaeilge, was officially opened by Éamon Ó Cúiv, T.D., Minister for Community, Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs, in the presence of Dr Iognáid Ó Muircheartaigh, President of NUI Galway. The ceremony also included the conferring of Diplomas on 75 students, who completed academic programmes at the Gaoth Dobhair campus and for the first time in Ireland, NUI Galway conferred Honorary Degrees outside the Galway campus. Tomás Mac Giolla Bhríghde, Mícheál Mac Giolla Easbuic and Máire Mhic Niallais, three remarkable Donegal individuals, were conferred with honorary MA degrees, in recognition of the exceptional contribution they have made to their communities. Tomás Mac Giolla Bhríghde, from Gaoth Dobhair, was honoured for his contribution to the creation of employment and the promotion of arts, culture and the Irish language in Gaeltacht areas. Mícheál Mac Giolla Easbuic, from Cill Chartha, for his contribution to community development and sports through the medium of Irish in Gaeltacht areas, throughout Co. Donegal and nationally. Máire Mhic Niallais, from Machaire Rabhartaigh, for her long-term interest in and exceptional contribution to the Irish language and community development in Gaeltacht areas. NUI Galway established an education centre in Gaoth Dobhair three years ago at the invitation of Coiste na Crannóige and Comharchumann Forbartha Gaoth Dobhair. Údarás na Gaeltachta invited the University to locate in a premises in the Gaoth Dobhair Business Park. NUI Galway carried out extensive refurbishments on the 2,500 square meters of a building leased to it by Údarás na Gaeltachta. The refurbished centre has received generous support from the Department of Community, Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs, making it a most modern education and technology facility. It is estimated that activities at this new campus will generate €2 million annually in the local community. A range of third level full-time and part-time programmes through the medium of Irish, are provided at the Gaoth Dobhair campus, including Diplomas in Television Skills, Applied Computing, a Child Care and Language Acquisition programme and programmes in Irish. Further programmes are being planned in Computing and Business Administration, Translation Studies and Business Technology. In the past year, 150 students completed programmes at the centre. NUI Galway also intends providing degree programmes in Gaoth Dobhair in the near future. Dr. Iognáid Ó Muircheartaigh, President of NUI Galway and Reachtaire of an tAcadamh said: "This is a special day for Donegal when the Gaoth Dobhair University campus celebrates its official opening and we are particularly delighted to honour the commitment to their Gaeltacht communities of three extraordinary people. The conferring of academic qualifications today also recognises the importance of delivering third-level programmes to communities in their own locality. "The University's commitment to the Irish language is exemplified in our strategy of bringing the classroom and the research lab to the Gaeltacht and by supporting those communities to achieve language-centred, knowledge-based, economic self-reliance. "This campus in Gaoth Dobhair is designed to empower the local community to engage in, and benefit from skills and learning, that are key to the development of a knowledge-based economy. University programmes delivered here will focus on the creation of sustainable employment, providing graduates with the opportunity of remaining in their native place and further strengthen the linguistic and technological infrastructure of the area." Mr Éamon Ó Cuív, T.D., Minister for Community, Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs said: "The Government is totally committed to the enhancement of the status of the Irish language throughout the country as the first official language of the State. My Department and the Government have taken many initiatives in this regard. Amongst these is the enactment of the Official Languages Act, the establishment of the office of An Coimisinéir Teanga and achieving the recognition of Irish as an official and working language of the EU. All of these policies present us with tremendous challenges and opportunities. One of the challenges is to provide graduates who have a competence to work through Irish in a wide range of disciplines. "The development of 3rd level education through Irish is an important element of the work of my Department, the Department of Education and Science and Údarás na Gaeltachta. It is well recognised that centres of 3rd level education become magnets for growth in employment and the development of communities. For this reason, my Department and Údarás na Gaeltachta have supported the development of Gaeltacht 3rd level centres in An Cheathrú Rua, Carna and now in Gaoth Dobhair, under the aegis of NUI Galway. "I would like to congratulate NUI Galway for the very proactive role they have played and for their commitment and pioneering work in 3rd level education through Irish, particularly in the Gaeltacht, based on a policy of bringing education to the people rather than people to education. My Department looks forward to working in the future with the Department of Education and Science and with NUI Galway and other 3rd level institutions to assist in further developing this sector, which can contribute much both to the achievement of our national aims and to the future development of the Gaeltacht." Ends

Friday, 16 September 2005

Beidh na cláir acadúla teanga-lárnach agus eolasbhunaithe D'oscail Éamon Ó Cuív, T.D., an tAire Gnóthaí Pobail, Tuaithe agus Gaeltachta, campas €5m de chuid OÉ, Gaillimh i nGaoth Dobhair, Acadamh na hOllscolaíochta Gaeilge, go hoifigiúil inniu (16 Meán Fómhair), i láthair Uachtarán OÉ, Gaillimh, an Dr Iognáid Ó Muircheartaigh. Ina theannta sin, bronnadh Dioplóma ar 75 mac léinn a chríochnaigh cláir léinn ar champas Ghaoth Dobhair agus den chéad uair in Éirinn, bhronn OÉ, Gaillimh Céimeanna Oinigh taobh amuigh de champas na Gaillimhe. Fuair Tomás Mac Giolla Bhríghde, Mícheál Mac Giolla Easbuic agus Máire Mhic Niallais, céim oinigh MA. Triúr iad seo as Dún na nGall a bhfuil obair eisceachtúil déanta acu dá bpobail. Fuair Tomás Mac Giolla Bhríghde, as Gaoth Dobhair, céim oinigh as a bhfuil déanta aige le fostaíocht a chruthú agus ealaín, cultúr agus an Ghaeilge a chur chun cinn sa Ghaeltacht. Fuair Mícheál Mac Giolla Easbuic, as Cill Chartha, céim oinigh as a bhfuil déanta aige ar son na forbartha pobail agus an spóirt trí mheán na Gaeilge sa Ghaeltacht, ar fud Dhún na nGall agus ar fud na tíre. Fuair Máire Mhic Niallais, as Machaire Rabhartaigh, céim oinigh as an tsuim a léirigh sí sa Ghaeilge le fada agus as an obair éachtach atá déanta aici ar son na Gaeilge agus ar son phobal na Gaeltachta. Bhunaigh OÉ, Gaillimh ionad oideachais i nGaoth Dobhair trí bliana ó shin ar iarratas ó Choiste na Crannóige agus Comharchumann Forbartha Ghaoth Dobhair. Thug Údarás na Gaeltachta spás don Ollscoil i bPáirc Ghnó Ghaoth Dobhair. Rinne OÉ, Gaillimh athchóiriú ar an bhfoirgneamh 2,500 méadar cearnach atá ar léas acu ó Údarás na Gaeltachta. Tá an-tacaíocht faighte ag an ionad ón Roinn Gnóthaí Pobail, Tuaithe agus Gaeltachta, rud a fhágann gur ionad oideachais agus teicneolaíochta nua-aimseartha é. Meastar go gcruthóidh na gníomhaíochtaí ar an gcampas nua seo €2 mhilliún gach bliain don phobal áitiúil. Cuirtear réimse clár lánaimseartha agus páirtaimseartha tríú leibhéal ar fáil trí mheán na Gaeilge ar champas Ghaoth Dobhair, ar a n-áirítear Dioplóma i Scileanna Teilifíse, Ríomhaireacht Fheidhmeach, Clár Cúram Leanaí agus Sealbhú Teanga agus cláir sa Ghaeilge. Tá cláir eile á bpleanáil i Ríomhaireacht agus Riarachán Gnó, Staidéar an Aistriúcháin agus Teicneolaíocht an Ghnó. Le bliain anuas, chríochnaigh 150 mac léinn cláir oideachais san ionad. Tá rún ag OÉ, Gaillimh cláir chéime a sholáthar i nGaoth Dobhair go gairid. Bhí an méid seo a leanas le rá ag an Dr Iognáid Ó Muircheartaigh, Uachtarán OÉ, Gaillimh agus Reachtaire an Acadaimh: Lá speisialta é seo do Dhún na nGall agus oscailt oifigiúil champas Ollscoile Ghaoth Dobhair á cheiliúradh againn. Tá an-áthas orainn céimeanna oinigh a bheith á mbronnadh ar an triúr iontach seo as an obair eisceachtúil atá déanta acu ar son na Gaeltachta. Tugann bronnadh na gcáilíochtaí acadúla seo inniu aitheantas don tábhacht a bhaineann le cláir tríú leibhéal a chur ar fáil i gceantar na ndaoine féin. Tá dílseacht na hOllscoile don Ghaeilge le feiceáil inár straitéis trí a bheith ag tabhairt an seomra ranga agus an tsaotharlainn taighde chuig an nGaeltacht agus tacú leis na pobail neamhspleáchas eacnamaíoch trí chruthú fostaíochta atá eolasbhunaithe agus teanga-lárnach. Cuirfidh campas Ghaoth Dobhair ar chumas na bpobal áitiúil scileanna a fhoghlaim ar mhaithe le geilleagar eolasbhunaithe a fhorbairt. Díreoidh cláir ollscoile an Ionaid seo ar fhostaíocht inmharthana a chruthú, rud a thabharfaidh deis do chéimithe fanacht ina n-áit dúchais agus cur le hinfrastruchtúr teangeolaíoch agus teicneolaíoch an cheantair. Dúirt an tAire Gnóthaí Tuaithe, Pobail, agus Gaeltachta, Éamonn Ó Cuív, T.D., an méid seo a leanas: "Tá an rialtas seo tiomanta go huile agus go hiomlán do stádas na Gaeilge mar chéad teanga oifigiúil, a chur chun cinn ar fud na tíre. Is iomaí sin beart curtha i gcrích ag an Roinn agus ag an Rialtas lena mbainim, i dtaca leis an tiomantas sin. Orthu siúd tá, achtú Acht na dTeangacha Oifigiúla, bunú oifig an Choimisinéara Teanga, agus stádas oifigiúil a bhaint amach don Ghaeilge mar theanga oifigiúil agus mar theanga oibre san AE. Níl a fhios na dúshláin agus na deiseanna a eascraíonn as na beartais seo. Ar cheann de na dúshláin sin tá, céimithe a chur ar fáil i raon leathan disciplíní – céimithe a bheidh inniúil ar a gcuid oibre a dhéanamh trí mheán na Gaeilge. "Is gné thábhachtach de chuid obair na Roinne Gnóthaí Tuaithe, Pobail agus Gaeltachta, na Roinne Oideachais agus Eolaíochta, agus Údarás na Gaeltachta forbairt na hollscolaíochta Gaeilge ar an tríú leibhéal. Tá a fhios ag an saol Fódlach gur as institiúidí tríú leibhéal a eascraíonn fás na fostaíochta agus forbairt an phobail. Is ar an ábhar sin a thacaigh an Roinn Gnóthaí Pobail, Tuaithe agus Gaeltachta, agus Údarás na Gaeltachta, le forbairt na n-ionad tríú leibhéal Gaeltachta ar an gCeathrú Rua agus i gCarna. Is ar an ábhar céanna atáthar ag tacú anois le hionad seo Ghaoth Dobhair, faoi choimirce Ollscoil na hÉireann, Gaillimh. "Is maith liom comhghairdeachas a dhéanamh le hOllscoil na hÉireann, Gaillimh, as an ról forghníomhach a d'imir sí, as an tiomantas atá léirithe aici, agus as an obair cheannródaíoch atá déanta aici i réimse na hollscolaíochta Gaeilge, go háirithe sa Ghaeltacht. Obair í seo atá bunaithe ar an tuiscint sin gur chóir an t-oideachas a thabhairt i láthair na ndaoine seachas na daoine a thabhairt i láthair an oideachais. Is fada leis an Roinn go dté sí ag saothrú arís leis an Roinn Oideachais agus Eolaíochta, agus le hOllscoil na hÉireann, Gaillimh, agus le hinstitiúidí tríú leibhéal eile, le cúnamh a thabhairt le tuilleadh forbartha a dhéanamh ar an earnáil seo, earnáil a bhfuil sé d'acmhainn aici cur go mór le baint amach aidhmeanna náisiúnta na tíre agus le forbairt fhadtréimhseach na Gaeltachta." Críoch

Wednesday, 7 September 2005

Reframing Islam: Politics into Law, 10-11th September, Irish Centre for Human Rights, NUI Galway Some of the most influential writers and thinkers on Islam will travel to Galway this week to address and recapture the debate on the social, political and religious dimensions of Islam. They will be attending a conference on "Reframing Islam: Politics into Law," which will be hosted by the Irish Centre for Human Rights in the Arts Millennium Building at NUI Galway on Saturday and Sunday, the 10-11th September. Sunday is the fourth anniversary of 9/11. Speakers will include a leading Iranian activist, imprisoned in Tehran for criticising the regime and an acclaimed Islamic scholar recently refused entry to the US by Homeland Security. The conference aims to challenge and move beyond the stereotypes that currently grip the discourse on Islam—terrorism, enforced democracy building, Islamophobia, and militant regimes. Topics to be addressed include: challenges to the Muslim world post September 11th, the question of democracy in Islam, rights of non-Muslims in Islam, human rights and Islam, women within Islam, and specific regional challenges and attempts to create a civic Islam. The conference will explore what Islamic political thought is, and how it originated, developed and changed over the past 1400 years, and particularly since 2001. Dr Kathleen Cavanaugh, of the Irish Centre for Human Rights, NUI Galway and conference director said: It is a great privilege for the Irish Centre for Human Right to welcome the pre-eminent writers and thinkers in the Muslim world to NUI Galway, to debate critical issues facing Islam and current Western liberal perceptions of Islam. There is an urgency to begin to reframe the debates and the narratives that have enveloped the discourse on Islam, especially post September 11th—the twinning of Islam and violence, the arguments that there cannot be faith in democracy, the notion that there is a 'clash of civilizations.' This conference hopes to provide a space that goes beyond the idea of right thinking and wrong thinking and to lend some empirical and theoretical weight to the current debate on Islam. Dr Cavanaugh went on to say that change and reform within Islam, grassroots in origin, is underway and, as one commentator has noted is, "Islam's best kept secret." Change can be charted in countries such as Malaysia, Morocco and Turkey where civil society (informing political establishments) have endeavoured to address questions of democracy, gender equality and reinforcing and nourishing a vibrant civil society. Yet these changes and challenges are off the radar. This conference will attempt to refocus and reframe the debate on Islam, looking beyond the current 'face of Islam' to what is actually happening within Islam—which is both multifaceted and complex and often contradictory, i.e., moderate to extreme, reform to regressive, she said. Amongst those addressing the conference will be: Professor Tariq Ramadan, recently appointed (August 2005) by Tony Blair to a UK government taskforce attempting to root out Islamic extremism in Britain, is the grandson of Hassan al-Banna, founder, in 1928, of the Muslim brotherhood. Dr. Ramadan lectures at academic institutions and civic organizations around the world. He has authored and co-authored over 20 books and over 700 articles. Through his writings and lectures, he has contributed substantially to the debate on the issues of Muslims in the West and Islamic revival in the Muslim world. He is active both at the academic and grassroots levels, lecturing extensively throughout the world on ethics of citizenship, social justice, and dialogue between civilizations. Dr Tariq Ramadan taught Islamic Studies and Philosophy as a professor at Freiburg University in Switzerland for many years. Regarded as one of the most important voices in Islam, Dr Ramadan was not allowed enter the United States in 2004, to take up his post as Professor of Religion Conflict and Peacebuilding at the University of Notre Dame. Dr Mohsen Kadivar is a cleric and activist in Iran. Kadivar was arrested for the first in 1978 and 20 years later, the unconstitutional Court of Iran found him guilty of campaigning against the Islamic Republic, because of the statements he had made in an interview where he argued that acts of terrorism are condemned in the eyes of the Shiite faith. He was sentenced to spend 18 months in Evin Prison, Tehran, and was released on July 17, 2000. He is still campaigning for the reform of the Islamic Republic of Iran. Dr. Muqtedar Khan is Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science and International Relations, at the University of Delaware. Author of many books, including American Muslims: Bridging Faith and Freedom (Amana, 2002), Jihad for Jerusalem: Identity and Strategy in International Relations (Praeger, 2004), Dr Khan frequently comments on BBC, CNN, FOX and VOA TV, NPR and other radio and TV networks. His political commentaries appear regularly in newspapers in over 20 countries. Dr. Jillian Schwedler is Assistant Professor of Government and Politics at the University of Maryland and has conducted extensive field research in Egypt, Jordan, and Yemen. She has travelled to Lebanon, Turkey, Qatar, Syria, Israel/Palestine, and more than two-dozen countries outside the Middle East. She is currently Chair of the Board of Directors of the Middle East Research and Information Project (MERIP), publishers of the quarterly journal Middle East Report. In 2002, she was elected Secretary of the Palestinian American Research Centre (PARC). Dr. Schwedler s current research interests include protests and policing, political Islam, social movements, democracy and democratisation, identity, political culture, and transnational public spheres. Additional speakers, their profiles and the conference agenda can be found on: www.reframingislam.org Ends

Monday, 5 September 2005

Professor William A. Schabas, NUI Galway, has been named an Officer of the Order of Canada, Canada's highest civilian honour. William Schabas holds the chair in human rights law in the Faculty of Law. He is also the director of the Irish Centre for Human Rights, NUI Galway. The appointment was made by the Governor-General of Canada. Members of the Order of Canada are selected by a panel chaired by the Chief Justice of Canada. Appointment as an Officer in the Order of Canada recognises 'a lifetime of achievement and merit of a high degree, especially in service to Canada or to humanity at large'. The Governor-General of Canada is authorised to appoint a maximum of sixty-four persons each year as Officers in the Order of Canada. Professor Schabas, who is a Canadian citizen, will be inducted into the Order of Canada by the new Governor-General of Canada, Michaëlle Jean, at a ceremony to be held in Ottawa later in the year. Congratulating Professor Schabas on the prestigious honour bestowed on him, Dr Iognáid Ó Muircheartaigh, President of NUI Galway said: We are delighted and proud that Professor Schabas has been awarded Canada's highest civilian honour. A legal scholar of international renown, Professor Schabas is an outstanding author, teacher and human rights advocate. As Director of the Irish Centre for Human Rights, Professor Schabas leads academic staff and students in the study and promotion of human rights and humanitarian law. William Schabas is distinguished for his expertise in the fields of international human rights law, international criminal law and international humanitarian law. His many books and articles, published in both English and French, have been translated into many languages, and are regularly cited by the world's leading courts and tribunals. Professor Schabas has often served in international human rights monitoring functions for such international non-governmental organisations as Amnesty International and the International Federation of Human Rights. He has participated in missions to such countries as Rwanda, Sudan, Burundi, Cambodia and the Russian Federation. William Schabas was one of three international members of the Sierra Leone Truth and Reconciliation Commission, which presented its final report in 2004. Ends

Monday, 24 October 2005

"Students are at the core of everything NUI Galway does, from the provision of top-class facilities to promoting research, from recognising the importance of teaching to fostering social inclusion and encouraging diversity", stated Dr Iognáid Ó Muircheartaigh, President of NUI Galway at the first of a series of conferring ceremonies today (Monday), that will see more than 4,000 students graduate by the end of the week. NUI Galway campus has experienced major infrastructural development with the investment of €200 million in new buildings. Dr Ó Muircheartaigh announced further developments, which include the imminent openings of the €16 million J.E. Cairnes Graduate School of Business and Public Policy and a €23 million Nursing and Therapies Building. Plans are at an advantaged stage for a proposed €55 million Engineering School and a major €21 million Sports Centre will commence in Spring 2006. During this week's conferring ceremonies, Dr Ó Muircheartaigh will also present the inaugural President's Awards for Teaching Excellence, in recognition of the many dedicated and inspirational teachers among Academic Staff, whose outstanding efforts ensure that students of NUI Galway receive the highest quality learning experience. Referring to NUI Galway's significant success in attracting research funding, which has amounted to €100 million since 1999, Dr Ó Muircheartaigh said this had enabled research centres to be established on campus which will "provide post-graduate opportunities for many of this week's graduates, opportunities which previously would only have been available abroad." He went on to urge the Government "to continue to invest in this research and education infrastructure, so that generations of graduates will have a future of economic prosperity and opportunity." Dr Ó Muircheartaigh stressed NUI Galway's commitment to social inclusion, saying that the University is "continuing to develop and expand educational programmes to enhance access for the widest population from the regional level to the international level." Through Adult Education and life-long learning opportunities, and through Access and Foundation courses for both school leavers and mature learners, especially for less advantaged students, NUI Galway continues to support the education needs of the wider population. The growing participation of students from abroad which brings increased cultural diversity to the campus, is an important dimension of student life and Dr Ó Muircheartaigh said that the recently established International Scholarship Programme, would enable talented students from the developing world to undertake post-graduate studies at NUI Galway. Ends

Wednesday, 19 October 2005

At a reception today, the Conference of Heads of Irish Universities (C.H.I.U), the representative body of the seven Irish Universities, announced the change of its name to the Irish Universities Association (IUA). Also unveiled was the organisation's new website www.iua.ie. The new name better represents the objectives of the organisation and its work on behalf of the seven universities. The IUA provides a forum for the Presidents and senior officers of the universities to identify the strategic challenges facing the university system and to agree on the policies and plans for tackling them and developing the sector. As well as representing the universities, the IUA has undertaken substantive work on behalf of the universities in areas such as the following – Establishing expertiseireland.com with the financial assistance of InterTradeIreland which now has online profiles of over 3,700 experts from the nine universities north and south, and a growing number from the Institutes of Technology. Operating the National Office for the Marie Curie Scheme –the most successful programme for Irish Research under the EU6th Framework Programme with funding of €42m already secured Setting up the Irish Researchers' Mobility Office & Portal with financial support from the European Commission and the Department of Enterprise, Trade and Employment. Speaking at the launch, Prof. Ferdinand von Prondzynski, President of DCU said: "The change of name is timely, and will allow us to focus our efforts more effectively. We know that Ireland's growth and competitiveness depends on the universities being effective and coherent in acting together. We know that universities are critical in securing a succesful economy, a vibrant cultural life and a stable society. The universities must improve the international ranking of the system, but also exercise leadership within Ireland during these challenging times." Professor von Prondzynski used this opportunity to call on action by the government to deal with the critical issue of university funding as recommended by the OECD Report published over a year ago. He stated: "The present financial position of the sector is totally unsustainable. It's a problem that can be solved, but it needs to be solved right now, not next year, not some time in the future". He said that the IUA will continue to work in partnership with the government, its departments and agencies, the European Commission and other stakeholders. He said: "The objective is to make Ireland a leading knowledge society. It cannot be done without us. We are here to help." Ends

Monday, 17 October 2005

NUI Galway will confer Honorary MA degrees next week on PJ Curtis, Pádraic Breathnach and Ollie Jennings for their outstanding contribution to the Arts in Ireland. The ceremonies will take place Monday 24th October and Tuesday 25th October 2005. PJ Curtis, broadcaster, author, record producer and lecturer, will be recognised for his significant contribution to many aspects of Irish cultural life throughout a career that has spanned 30 years. A native of Kilnaboy, County Clare, Mr Curtis has won numerous awards for his radio documentaries which include the 1980 ground-breaking 'The House of R&B', the first programme on Irish radio to regularly feature authentic Blues, Cajun, African and World Music. Having produced 53 albums, he has worked with Ireland's finest artists and as a music historian, has lectured at home and throughout the US. Mr Curtis will be conferred with an honorary MA degree on Monday, 24th October at 11.00am. Padraic Breathnach, will be honoured for his immense contribution to cultural life in Galway and Ireland. A fluent Irish speaker, Pádraic grew up in Carna, Connemara. As a student in NUI Galway, he was deeply involved with An Cumann Drámaíochta and Dramsoc, where he teamed up with Ollie Jennings in a series of groundbreaking cultural initiatives in and out of college. He worked with An Taibhdhearc and Druid Theatres and became the first manager of Galway Arts Centre, before co-founding Macnas with Ollie Jennings. As both performer and Artistic Drector, Padraic Breathnach became the most visable face of Macnas, which as well as presenting the annual Galway parade, toured the US and with U2, over 40 cities in Europe. Macnas represented Ireland on the world cultural stage in Seville 1992 and was invited to usher in the new Millennium in New York in December 1999. As an actor, Pádraic has worked in several films and television programmes and now presents his own arts programme 'Soiscéal Phádraic' on TG4. Pádraic Breathnach will receive his honorary MA degree on Tuesday, 25th October at 11.00am. Ollie Jennings will also be honoured for his outstanding contribution to the Arts in Galway and Ireland. He worked alongside his friend Padraic Breathnach from his student days at NUI Galway, developing the Arts Festival into one of the most innovative and outstanding arts and cultural events in Europe. The two are synonomous with Galway's cultural renaissance in the last three decades. This artistic relationship was strengthened further when they co-founded the Macnas group. Ollie continued to develop and guide both organisations until 1990 when he joined the Sawdoctors as manager. Jennings will be conferred with an honorary MA degree on Tuesday, 25th October at 2.00pm. Ends

Monday, 17 October 2005

NUI Galway's Medical School is to join forces with the University of Ulster to provide increased opportunities for medical graduates in the north-western area. Proposed developments at the University of Ulster, focussed on its Magee campus in Derry will provide further impetus for the extension of healthcare education in the region. The Medical School at NUI Galway has also established links over many years with Altnagelvin Hospital in Derry and this has resulted in the formation of the western region education network incorporating all hospitals in the West and Northwest. With the expected permission of the State and the Higher Education Authority, NUI Galway intends to introduce graduate entry from 2006, doubling the number of places in its Medical school. It is the intention of the University that this development will provide places for 50 graduate students and 100 undergraduates annually. Graduate students will have an honours degree and will follow a four-year programme, in place of the six-year programme undergraduate students must complete and the University will continue to admit overseas students. "Clinical placement is crucial to medical education and while substantive links exist with affiliated hospitals in the Western region, there is potential for significant additional capacity at a clinical level for students in the these hospitals including Letterkenny, Sligo, Roscommon, Portiuncula and Castlebar," says Dr Phillip A Carney, Dean of the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, NUI Galway. The Faculty encompasses a School of Nursing and a School of Therapies, and it is anticipated that by 2007, it will accommodate over 1,400 students. St. Angela's College, Sligo has recently become a constituent college of NUI Galway and the University is also uniquely placed in that it is the only university within the EU-designated Border, Midlands and West (BMW) area. Dr Carney said: "NUI Galway and the University of Ulster believe that the provision of suitable doctors for the BMW region as well as the western half of Northern Ireland may best be achieved by expanding medical education opportunities in the locality. It has long been recognised that graduates in any discipline from a particular university are more likely to seek employment in the area where they are educated. A further benefit of a conjoint approach by the two universities to undergraduate medical education will be the development of cross-border research programmes, which will lead to more effective patient care in the region enhancing opportunities for continuing professional development for all professional groups in the Health Services in both institutions". The University of Ulster's commitment to enhancing the provision and quality of professional healthcare education in the North West was emphasised by Professor Bernie Hannigan, Pro-Vice Chancellor. "We are delighted to work closely with NUI Galway,' said Professor Hannigan. 'Improved medical education will bring many benefits to the standards of care available in the region and will be a new and important focus for economic development. Effective partnerships, both among universities and the health sector across the North West are essential for success." Ends

Wednesday, 12 October 2005

The National University of Ireland has awarded the Irish Historical Research Prize 2005 to Christopher Maginn for 'Civilizing' Gaelic Leinster: The Extension of Tudor Rule in the O'Byrne and O'Toole Lordships published by Four Courts Press in 2004. The Irish Historical Research Prize of €3,000 is awarded for the best work of original scholarship by an NUI graduate or student published in the past three years. Dr Christopher Maginn is a graduate of NUI Galway and Assistant Professor of History at Fordham University, New York. Special Commendation was given to Dr Nollaig O Muraíle for his mammoth five volume edition of Leabhar Mór na nGenealach: The Great Book of Irish Genealogies compiled (1645-66) by Dubhaltach Mac Fhirbhisigh, published by Eamonn de Búrca/Edmund Burke, Publisher 2004, which he considered "an enormous contribution to the study of Irish genealogy". Dr Ó Muraíle, is a member of the staff of the NUI Galway Scoil na Gaeilge. The last winner of the Irish Historical Research Prize was Nicholas P. Canny for,Making Ireland British 1580-1650 published in 2001 by Oxford University Press. The full list of NUI Galway graduates who were awarded NUI awards are as follows: Irish Historical Research Prize Dr Christopher R. Maginn NUI Post-Doctoral Fellowship in the Humanities Dr Jane S. Grogan Travelling Studentship in Archaeology Mr John G. Malcolm Travelling Studentship in Medicine Dr Esther O'Sullivan Travelling Studentship in Mathematics Ms Brenda Ryan Travelling Studentship in Astrophysics Mr Damien Quinn Dr. Mary.L. Thornton Scholarship in Education Ms Elaine Keane Dr HH Stewart Literary Scholarship in French - 2nd Prize Ms Chloé Diskin Dr HH Stewart Literary Scholarship in German – 2nd Prize Ms Mairéad Una Ní Chatháin Dr HH Stewart Literary Scholarship in German - CommendationMs Chloé Diskin Dr HH Stewart Literary Scholarship in Italian – 3rd Prize Ms Cristina Ciamberlano Dr HH Stewart Medical Scholarship in Biochemistry – 3rd Prize Mr Chee Peng Hor Dr HH Stewart Medical Scholarship in Gynaecology and Obstetrics Ms Gabrielle Colleran Dr HH Stewart Medical Scholarship in Gynaecology and Obstetrics – 2nd Prize Mr Nigel Glynn Dr HH Stewart Medical Scholarship in Medical Microbiology Ms Rachel Fallon Dr HH Stewart Medical Scholarship in Medical Microbiology – 3rd Prize Ms Ciara Freeman Dr HH Stewart Medical Scholarship in Medicine, Ms Emma Harrington Dr HH Stewart Medical Scholarship in Paediatrics Mr Donal Sexton Dr HH Stewart Medical Scholarship in Pathology – 2nd Prize Mr Kevin Cronin Dr HH Stewart Medical Scholarship in Pharmacology Ms Maeve Ann O'Reilly Dr HH Stewart Medical Scholarship in Physiology – 2nd Prize Mr Patrick Gleeson Dr HH Stewart Medical Scholarship in Psychiatry – 3rd Prize Ms Éadaoin Ní Challaráin Dr HH Stewart Medical Scholarship in Psychiatry - Commendation Mr Donal Sexton Dr HH Stewart Medical Scholarship in Surgery – 2nd Prize Ms Michelle O'Shaughnessy NUI/Denis Phelan Scholarship in Electronic Engineering Mr Dermot Campbell NUI/Denis Phelan Scholarship in Science: in the "Numerative Sciences" Mr Connell Murphy NUI/French Government Medal and NUI Prize for Proficiency in French Ms Valeria Ballarotti

Monday, 3 October 2005

Best-selling author and journalist, Robert Fisk will deliver a public talk entitled "Into the wilderness: how to escape history in Iraq" in the Kirwan Lecture Theatre, Arts/Science Building, NUI Galway at 7.30pm on Tuesday, 18 October 2005. The event is a joint benefit for the Irish Centre for Human Rights, NUI Galway and Amnesty International (Ireland). Fisk, based in Beirut as Middle East Correspondent of 'The Independent,' has lived in the Middle East for almost three decades and holds more British and international journalism awards than any other foreign correspondent. His last book, "Pity the Nation," a history of the war in Lebanon, was published to great critical acclaim. His recent publication "The Great War for Civilisation: the Conquest of the Middle East," provides a narrative of how the bloodshed and cruelty unfolding in Iraq, Afghanistan, Algeria, Iran, Palestine and other battlefields, the carnage of September 11th, 2001 and the overthrow of Saddam Hussein's brutal regime take on a new and frightening meaning. Dr Kathleen Cavanaugh, Irish Centre for Human Rights, NUI Galway said: "The role of the media in providing a fact finding mechanism and framework through which we can better understand geo-political events is crucial. Increasingly, however, significant questions have been raised regarding the independence of the media and whether many 'news' sources are, in fact, reporting on facts or increasingly tied to the political landscape. Robert Fisk has stood apart from this worrying trend and consistently provides a powerful and passionate commentary, which challenges, disturbs and pinpricks the conscience. We are delighted he has agreed to join us here in Galway to share his views of the tragedy that is today's Iraq." Seán Love, Executive Director of Amnesty International Irish Section said: "Robert Fisk is a true investigative journalist, utterly independent, fearless in where he is willing to go and what he is willing to write. His journalism and his books have exposed serious human rights issues in many parts of the world, and his ongoing willingness to expose injustice - no matter who it places in the dock - is a shining example to journalism, and to the very precious right and responsibility of freedom of expression." During his visit to NUI Galway on the 18th October, the Irish Centre for Human Rights (ICHR) will also host a book signing for Robert Fisk. This event will take place from 5.00pm to 6.30pm, at the Centre (located just across from the Cathedral in a two storey yellow stone building, near the University rowing club). Tickets for the public lecture will go on sale today (Monday) in Áras Fáilte, NUI Galway's Visitor and Information Centre and also in the Amnesty International Shop on Middle Street, Galway. Please note that there is a limited number of tickets available and these will be sold on a first come first served basis with ticket prices at €8 for students, unwaged and Amnesty members and €15 for all others. Ends

Friday, 25 November 2005

ICHEC, Ireland s first national high-performance computing facility, joins prestigious Top500 list at rank 205 Ireland s first dedicated supercomputing facility, the Irish Centre for High-End Computing (ICHEC), has shot straight to the upper half of the Top500, a definitive listing of the world s fastest supercomputers. ICHEC s ranking at 205 is a major achievement for the Centre, which was officially opened just three months ago, to provide the vast computational facilities increasingly in demand by Irish researchers. "The Top500 list has been published semi-annually since 1993, and Irish computers have only appeared in the list twice, always near the bottom," said Dr. Andy Shearer, It Department of NUI Galway and Director of ICHEC. "ICHEC s ranking at 205 is a tremendous achievement, and shows the importance of the Government s investment into this kind of ICT infrastructure." Now in its 26th edition, the Top500 is recognised by the global IT industry as the world s most definitive listing of supercomputing facilities. The list is in a constant state of flux, as high-end computing facilities all over the world continue to expand their capacity. The facilities listed at 500 in the current list, for example, would have ranked at 73 just a year ago. "With this pace of development, it s essential that Ireland put sustained investment into high-performance computing resources, if we want to keep Irish scientists on a competitive footing with their international peers," said Dr. Shearer. "ICHEC s aim is to develop a proper infrastructure for Irish computational science, and this will only be possible if we invest in more powerful machines. I would like to see us reaching the top 50." Non-commercial Irish researchers are already using ICHEC facilities to undertake dozens of computationally intensive projects in areas including climate modelling, comparative genomics, molecular research, astrophysics modelling and simulation and medical implants research. ICHEC plays an essential role in fulfilling the Government s objective of substantially increasing Ireland s R&D activity by 2010, including a doubling of R&D undertaken in the higher education and public sectors. ICHEC is supported by a grant from Science Foundation Ireland and by contributions from two high-capacity computing projects funded by the Higher Education Authority s Programme for Research in Third-Level Institutions -- TCD s Institute for Information Technology and Advanced Computation (IITAC) and CosmoGrid. "CosmoGrid is delighted with this ranking, which vindicates the decision to pool our own Higher Education Authority funds with those of ICHEC to obtain a substantially more powerful system than either of us could have obtained on our own," said Professor Luke Drury, Head of the School of Cosmic Physics at the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies. Ends

Tuesday, 22 November 2005

Thousands of second-level students and their parents from all over the country are expected to attend NUI Galway's annual Open Day which will take place this year on Thursday 1st December, from 9.00am to 3.00pm. For students – whether they are Second-Level, Access or Mature – this day presents the ideal opportunity to obtain the kind of in-depth information about the courses and outcomes that they are looking for. Academic staff from the University's 52 departments will be available at the exhibition stands to answer queries and provide detailed subject and course information. "The range of courses on offer is immense, and Leaving Cert students often find it difficult to choose the options best suited to them," says Michael Howley, NUI Galway's Schools Liaison Officer. "Open Day provides the perfect opportunity for students to meet academic staff and postgraduate students, who will discuss course content, answer queries and provide advice at the stands in Áras na Mac Léinn/Student Centre and in the Arts/Science building." He explains why NUI Galway is the first choice option for many students when completing their CAO forms: "Prospective students will be made aware of our world-class teaching and research – the University takes pride in being student-centred. And what's more they will find out that student life in Galway is second to none!" "Galway is a relatively small city," he continues, "but big on atmosphere. The University campus is centrally located and accommodation is both plentiful and reasonably priced. Students who choose NUI Galway fall in love with the West and always treasure their student days here." On their arrival at NUI Galway on 1st December, students are requested to come to the assembly point in the Quadrangle Building. They will then go to the Martin Ryan Institute where they will register for the Open Day and enter a prize draw. Top prizes include Apple iPods. There will be introductory lectures and exhibition areas to enjoy. Guided tours of the campus will be provided throughout the day. Included are visits to the following: Clinical Science Institute (Medical School) Arts Millennium Building Áras na Gaeilge Student Accommodation Sports Facilities as well the University's newest buildings: the J.E. Cairnes Graduate School of Business and Public Policy and Áras Moyola, which accommodates the Centre for Nursing Studies, Therapies and the Department of Political Science and Sociology Laboratory demonstrations will be held in the Departments of Physics and Chemistry. Students will also have the opportunity to visit the Information Technology Labs, and the University's Applied Languages Centre. NUI Galway continues to provide the best academic options and facilities for its students, thus maintaining its position at the forefront of education in Ireland. Due for construction is a €53m. Engineering School, while plans are well advanced for the construction of a new Student Centre which will include a swimming pool. Ends

Monday, 21 November 2005

The Faculty of Law at NUI Galway has announced the appointment of Mrs Justice Catherine McGuinness to the position of Adjunct Professor of Law. Mrs. Justice McGuinness is a judge of the Irish Supreme Court and President of the Law Reform Commission. A former senator representing the University of Dublin, Trinity College panel in Seanad Éireann, Mrs McGuinness has also acted as the Chairperson of the Forum for Peace & Reconciliation. Welcoming the appointment, Marie McGonagle, Head of the Law Department and Director of the LL.M in Public Law said: "Given her dynamic track record as both a judge and legislator, it is especially appropriate that Mrs. Justice McGuinness will be associated with our new LL.M programme in Public Law. The students on that programme – which is the first of its kind in Ireland – will have the benefit of her extensive knowledge and experience". The Dean of Law, Donncha O'Connell, said the Faculty was honoured that a person of Mrs. Justice McGuinness's calibre was willing to accept the University's offer of an Adjunct Chair for a three-year period. He added that he looked forward to a fruitful period of engagement between the academic staff and student community in NUI Galway and an eminent member of the Irish judiciary. "This will cement the already healthy relationship between the Faculty and judiciary developed in recent years through the Faculty's involvement in editing and producing the Judicial Studies Institute Journal" he said.

Monday, 21 November 2005

The Irish Universities Association today announced the successful funding of research in Irish Universities and Industry to the tune of €10million in the current EU Marie Curie funding round. This brings the total amount of funding, secured by Ireland from the European Commission's highly competitive Marie Curie Programme, to €42 million. The funding will expand Ireland's R&D capability by attracting a total of 220 top class researchers from around the world. The current round represents 16 funded projects across eight Irish organisations: Cellix Ltd., Sigmoid Ltd., Duolog Ltd., Celtic Catalysts Ltd., University College Cork, University College Dublin, Trinity College Dublin and NUI Galway. The projects span a large variety of disciplines, from life sciences to nanotechnology and also include the humanities. The significance of this success for Irish Research cannot be understated, as the contract values represent almost one quarter of the total available fund for all Europe under this scheme. The Irish Universities Association (IUA) provides a national support service for industry and academia in preparing and submitting proposals to this programme. Harnessing academic know-how in accessing European funds is helping Irish Industry in building R&D capability. Dr. Conor O'Carroll, head of the Research Office at the IUA said: " This is an example of where universities and companies working together can demonstrate the high quality of R&D in Ireland by being more successful than any other European country in securing funding from this highly sought after funding." The stated Government policy is to increase research in Irish industry. In this context, the Irish Universities Association undertook to actively promote the Marie Curie Programme to companies. As a direct result, 20% of the total €42million has been won by Industry here. This proves that despite Government concerns about the decreasing involvement of Irish Industry in FP6, the Marie Curie Programme is bucking this trend. The Marie Curie Programme covers the salary costs of researchers hired for the project and contributes to research, management costs and overheads. Contract values vary between €150,000 for a single researcher up to €1.5million for a research team. The importance of this funding for research is illustrated by an awardee, Dr. Michael Madden of the Laboratory for Biomedical Data Mining in NUI Galway, "It will contribute to NUI Galway's capacity to perform research, and help to improve the competitiveness within the knowledge economy of the Objective 1 Region in which Galway is located. It will also enhance our interactions with other European research institutes, and help promote research as a profession. We owe a debt of gratitude to the IUA in their assistance on how to structure a proposal and their advice most certainly contributed to its success". Significant opportunities still remain for research organisations in the Marie Curie Programme with more than €450million available in early 2006. The Irish Universities Association will strongly support potential applicants in industry, universities and institutes of technology to maximise further success. Ends