Course Overview

Driven by a commitment to research-informed interdisciplinary education, the MSc examines demographic ageing from a public policy perspective, critically assessing existing approaches and future directions to secure an effective and fair means of engaging older people in ageing societies. 

Hosted at the internationally recognised Irish Centre for Social Gerontology, the course comprises of an applied project, and taught modules in the areas of: public policy and the economics of ageing; social exclusion and inequality; international policy; health systems and policy analysis; work, pensions and retirement; and diversity, ageing and the life course.

In completing this programme, students will be able to:

  • Analyse critical policy challenges relevant to demographic ageing and the lived experiences of a diverse older population;
  • Assess the role of public policy in the fair and effective allocation of resources and opportunities across the life course;
  • Evaluate the readiness and influence of existing policy structures and broader socio-political context on the success of policy implementation;
  • Assess to what degree the application of policy levers are supporting older people and boosting system sustainability, or creating new unintended inequalities and system sustainability issues.

COVID-19

The COVID-19 pandemic poses extraordinary risks to the health of older adults and, upon contraction, has immediate consequences for individual well-being and, potentially, for mortality outcomes. However, aside from the detrimental health impacts of the disease itself, older people can experience other damaging outcomes as a result of strategies and discourses related to controlling and treating the virus. To view four short critical messages for policy and response formulation during the COVID-19 crisis, developed by the ICSG, please click here:

http://www.nuigalway.ie/opinion/combatting-exclusions-and-ageism-for-older-people-during-the-covid-19-pandemic.html

Scholarships available
Find out about our Postgraduate Scholarships here

Video

Please click on this video to view some of the ageing related public-policy work and messages that our programme lectures are involved with.

Ageing and Public Policy flyer

Applications and Selections

Applications are made online via the NUI Galway Postgraduate Applications System

Who Teaches this Course

Requirements and Assessment

Key Facts

Entry Requirements

Normally a H2.1 undergraduate degree is required in a related social science discipline (e.g. economics; sociology; management; social work; policy orientated degrees) or a cognate field of study (e.g. health sciences; public health). IELTS score of 6.5 or equivalent if applicable. Applications from people with commensurate experience in ageing-related policy and practice will also be considered.


Additional Requirements

Duration

1 year, full-time; 2 years, part-time

Next start date

September 2021

A Level Grades ()

Average intake

25

Closing Date

 Please view the offer rounds website.

NFQ level

Mode of study

ECTS weighting

90

Award

CAO

Course code

1MEP1; 1MEP2

Course Outline

List of modules:

  • Introduction to Ageing Studies and Policy
  • International Policy and Ageing
  • Social Exclusion and Inequalities in Later Life
  • Data Management and Survey Techniques
  • Dynamics of Ageing and Public Policy
  • Health Systems and Policy Analysis
  • Work, Pensions and Retirement
  • Environmental Gerontology and Ageing in Place Policy
  • Cost Benefit Analysis and Evaluation
  • Law and Policy on Independent Living
  • Legal Capacity Law and Policy
  • Applied Research Project

Curriculum Information

Curriculum information relates to the current academic year (in most cases).
Course and module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Glossary of Terms

Credits
You must earn a defined number of credits (aka ECTS) to complete each year of your course. You do this by taking all of its required modules as well as the correct number of optional modules to obtain that year's total number of credits.
Module
An examinable portion of a subject or course, for which you attend lectures and/or tutorials and carry out assignments. E.g. Algebra and Calculus could be modules within the subject Mathematics. Each module has a unique module code eg. MA140.
Optional
A module you may choose to study.
Required
A module that you must study if you choose this course (or subject).
Semester
Most courses have 2 semesters (aka terms) per year.

Year 1 (90 Credits)

Required EC515: Data Management & Survey Techniques


Semester 1 | Credits: 10

This is a research methods course. The aim of the course is to introduce students to the concepts and practice of research. It is aimed to be a practical course so that students become familiar with how to do research and what is considered good research practice. Students will be introduced to both quantitative and qualitative research methods and different types of research designs.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand the research process using applied techniques of health economics
  2. Inform global health policy by understanding how to critically assess policy-informed research
  3. Undertake applied research to inform global health policy or healthcare industry questions
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Written Assessment (50%)
  • Continuous Assessment (50%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Research Methods for the Behavioural Sciences" by F.J. Gravetter and L.A.B. Forzana
The above information outlines module EC515: "Data Management & Survey Techniques" and is valid from 2019 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required EC5136: Applied Research Project


12 months long | Credits: 20

The applied project provides an opportunity for students to apply learning from throughout the course to conduct independent and original work. The aims of the applied project is to enable the student to critically evaluate policy on ageing; to demonstrate independent research and analysis abilities and to apply theoretical knowledge acquired; and to produce either (a) a well written minor dissertation of approximately 15,000 words in length; or (b) an extended policy brief (8,000-10,000 words approx.) and organise and host a policy seminar with relevant stakeholders. Both options will aim to contribute to original research/policy knowledge. This module involves a series of discussions and meetings with supervisors, submission of research proposals, progress reporting to supervisors within agreed timeframes.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Formulate a valid research aim, and a set of objectives.
  2. Critical review and evaluate existing scientific evidence
  3. Assess and appraise relevant policy on the topic and indentify policy major challenges for consideration.
  4. Generate new knowledge through the application of specific research and review methods.
  5. Analyse and interpret this knowledge in light of existing work and policy in the area, and necessary future directions
  6. For option (b) only, strategically design and host dissemination event for the communication of main findings.
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Research (100%)
Module Director
The above information outlines module EC5136: "Applied Research Project " and is valid from 2020 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required EC5131: International Policy and Ageing across the Life Course


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

The aim of this module is to interrogate international policy concerning ageing across the life course, its historical development and likely future directions. First, students will be introduced to current developments and debates concerning the intersection of ageing and global development policy in low- and middle-income countries. In doing so, the module will analyse the policy landscape on ageing and unpack the role of policy in shaping responses to demographic processes in these contexts. Second, students will focus on the emergence of ageing as a human rights area. The module will critically assess the potential for a UN Treaty on the rights of older people to support and empower diverse ageing populations across international jurisdictions. Third, students will consider the application of selected human rights norms, currently enshrined in international human rights law, to key forms of mistreatment frequently experienced by people as they come to require personal care or assistance.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Recognise the significance of demographic transitions for public and social policy systems in low- and middle-income country (LMIC) contexts
  2. Analyse profiles of ageing populations and the needs and circumstances of older people in diverse LMIC contexts
  3. Assess approaches, issues and influences in public and social policy planning and implementation in specific LMIC scenarios
  4. Understand human rights in the context of ageing and the implications of applying a rights-based approach to public policies
  5. Critically engage with human rights scholarship and international human rights law to analyse and influence ageing policies and strategies
  6. Understand key doctrinal gaps in the existing international human rights law framework, how they have formed and the potential for the law’s progressive re-interpretation.
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
The above information outlines module EC5131: "International Policy and Ageing across the Life Course" and is valid from 2020 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required EC5134: Social Exclusion and Inequalities in Later Life


Semester 1 | Credits: 10

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the nature and patterns of social exclusion and inequalities in later life, with a specific focus on the implications for policy that aims to tackle multifaceted disadvantage. Students will be introduced to theories and conceptual models related to social exclusion across the life course, and relevant to policy formulation, including structural inequality and cumulative disadvantage and risk. The module will explore the major drivers of exclusion and inequality in older age and their relationship to individual experiences across the life-course, and social categorisations, such as socio-economic status, gender, race and ethnicity, and age itself. Students will analyse the future applicability of social exclusion as a policy development and implementation framework and as a means for integrating policy response across different areas.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Analyse the construction and implications of social exclusion and inequalities in later life, and the challenges for policy intervention.
  2. Understand the historic development of social exclusion as a policy construct, the evolution of related policy approaches, and the enablers and barriers to the implementation of these approaches.
  3. Evaluate the role of policy in mediating social exclusion outcomes, and analyse the intended and unintended consequences of policy intervention.
  4. Assess and critically evaluate measurement approaches and their appropriateness as underpinning instruments for policy development and establishing policy targets.
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Written Assessment (50%)
  • Research (50%)
Module Director
Reading List
  1. "Understanding Social Inequality: Intersections of Class, Age, Gender, Ethnicity, and Race. 3rd edition." by McMullin, J. and Curtis, J.
    Publisher: Oxford University Press.
  2. "Walsh, K, Carney, G., Ni Leime, A, (eds.) (2015). Ageing through Austerity. Policy Press." by n/a
  3. "Aging, Globalization and Inequality: The New Critical Gerontology." by Baars, J., Dannefer, D., Phillipson, C., Walker, A.
    Publisher: Routledge
The above information outlines module EC5134: "Social Exclusion and Inequalities in Later Life" and is valid from 2020 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required EC5132: Introduction to Ageing and Policy


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the interdisciplinary study of ageing and public policy. It will illustrate and analyse the importance of demographic ageing for public policy systems, and the challenge with respect to maintaining well-being and quality of life while addressing system sustainability concerns. Students will learn about the major theoretical and conceptual perspectives in the study of ageing and public policy, including economic, social and life-course aspects of ageing and psychosocial theories of ageing. Students will also be introduced to the broad shifts in ageing-related public policy, the core underpinning policy constructs, and the current national and European policy approaches to ageing populations.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand the importance of demographic ageing for the focus, sustainability and organisation of public and social policy systems.
  2. Possess knowledge of and critically evaluate major theoretical and conceptual perspectives in the study of ageing and public policy.
  3. Assess the shifts in the representation of ageing within the evolution of public and social policy for older adult populations.
  4. Understand major policy challenges and trends in contemporary national, and European approaches to policy on ageing and older people.
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Written Assessment (80%)
  • Department-based Assessment (20%)
Module Director
Reading List
  1. "International Handbook on Ageing and Public Policy." by Harper, S. and Hamblin, K. (eds.)
    Publisher: Edward Elgar
The above information outlines module EC5132: "Introduction to Ageing and Policy " and is valid from 2020 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required EC5123: Dynamics of Ageing and Public Policy


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

The objective of this module is to introduce students to current developments and debates in public and social policy on ageing. It will examine demand and sustainability implications of the most significant demographic challenge of the 21st century and the future policy directions necessary to address this challenge and support positive experiences in later life. Targeting the major domains of public and social policy, the module will foster students’ critical capacity to engage with and analyse relevant policies and cross-sector planning strategies. The module will also consider some of the implications of demographic ageing for other policy sectors and populations groups in related to health and well-being.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Evaluate and recognise the significance of demographic ageing for public and social policy systems, nationally and internationally.
  2. Analyse the different conceptual and implementation frameworks related to ageing and public and social policy.
  3. Outline the main challenges of ageing, in relation to provision and sustainability, across major policy domains
  4. Understand the policy levers available to governments to address demographic ageing, and the constraints and opportunities that need to be considered in their application.
  5. Critically engage with policy discourse to analyse development strategies and targets, and underlying values concerning how ageing and older people are positioned in policy systems
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "International Handbook on Ageing and Public Policy" by Harper, S. and Hamblin, K. (eds.)
    Publisher: Edward Elgar
  2. "Ageing through Austerity" by Walsh, K., Carney, G., and Ni Leime, A. (eds)
    Publisher: Policy Press
  3. "Aging, Globalization and Inequality The New Critical Gerontology." by Barrs, J. et al. (eds.)
    Publisher: Routledge
The above information outlines module EC5123: "Dynamics of Ageing and Public Policy" and is valid from 2019 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required EC572: Health Systems & Policy Analysis


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

This is a masters level module that examines the structure, conduct and performance of alternative models of finance and delivery in health care and critically examines the policy approaches developed to tackle key challenges in health and social care. The module builds upon the concept of market failure as it relates specifically to health care; critically appraises methods used to compare system performance and compares alternative systems in terms of performance. The objective of the module is to describe the key aspects of alternative health care systems; explore the evolution of a particular set of systems; examine how system structure relates to its operation and what light this sheds on the performance of those systems.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand the impact of market failure in health care on health and health care
  2. Have a critical appreciation of the design, operation and evolutionary development of alternative models of health care delivery and finance
  3. Be able to critically appraise alternative measures of health care system performance
  4. Be able to critically appraise alternative models of health care system in terms of performance
  5. Be able to critically appraise policy measures aimed at tackling key challenges for health care systems
  6. Be able to source, gather, interpret and use health and economic data
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Written Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "The Elgar companion to health economics" by Andrew Jones
    Publisher: Elgar Publishing
  2. "Economic analysis in health care" by Morris S, Devlin N, Parkin D..
    Publisher: Wiley
  3. "The economics of health and health care." by Folland S, Goodman AC, Stano M.
    Publisher: Pearson Education International
  4. "Health Economics" by Phelps CE
    Publisher: Pearson Education International
  5. "Health Economics: Fundamentals and flow of funds" by Getzen T.
    Publisher: Wiley
  6. "The provision and use of health services, health inequalities and health and social gain" by Nolan B.
    Publisher: ESRI
  7. "Health Policy Issues. An economic perspective on health reform" by Feldstein PJ.
The above information outlines module EC572: "Health Systems & Policy Analysis" and is valid from 2019 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required EC5135: Work, Pensions and Retirement


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

The aim of this module is to introduce students to policy measures and debates regarding pensions, work and retirement, from critical ageing and gender perspectives. First, students will be introduced to current developments and debates concerning employment, pensions and extended working life and auto-enrolment. The module will explore the role of demographic processes and international frameworks in shaping the policy landscape in these contexts. Second, students will focus on the gender and age implications of Irish employment and pensions policies, for different groups of workers those in physically-demanding and precarious work. Students will be introduced to employment and pension coverage patterns as well as recent empirical research on pensions and employment, both nationally and internationally.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Identify and discuss the main employment and pensions policies for older people in Ireland
  2. Critically assess these policies from a gender and political economy of ageing perspective
  3. Assess and discuss international and national policies on extended working life
  4. Be familiar with approaches to retirement from a theoretical and empirical perspective.
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (50%)
  • Department-based Assessment (50%)
Module Director
Reading List
  1. "Older Workers in an Ageing Society. Critical Topic in Research and Policy" by Taylor, P.
    Publisher: Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.
  2. "Gender Ageing and Longer Working Lives: Cross-national Perspectives" by Ní Léime Á., Street, D., Vickerstaff, S., Krekula, C. and Loretto, W. (eds.)
    Publisher: Bristol: Policy Press
The above information outlines module EC5135: "Work, Pensions and Retirement" and is valid from 2020 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional LW558: Legal Capacity Law and Policy


12 months long | Credits: 10

Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module LW558: "Legal Capacity Law and Policy" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional LW556: Law and Policy on Independent Living


12 months long | Credits: 10

Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module LW556: "Law and Policy on Independent Living" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional EC517: Cost Benefit Analysis & Evaluation


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

Evaluation of public sector projects or programmes is important and is required to ensure that resources are used in the best possible way and also to ensure that the government is getting value for money. The objective of this module is to introduce students to evaluation procedures and to Cost Benefit Analysis, the most commonly employed method for the evaluation of public sector projects or programmes.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand the fundamental theoritical and practical concepts and tools of CBA
  2. Undertake applied CBA to inform public policy.
  3. Critically appraise CBA case studies/reports used to inform public policy
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Written Assessment (60%)
  • Continuous Assessment (40%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Advanced Introduction to Cost-Benefit Analysis" by Brent, R.J.
    Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing Limited
  2. "Applied Methods of Cost-Benefit Analysis in Health Care" by McIntosh, E., Clare, PM, Frew, E.J., Louviere, J.L. (eds.).
    Publisher: Oxford University Press
  3. "Cost-Benefit Analysis and the Environment: Recent Development" by Pearce, D., Atkinson, G. and Mourato, S.
    Publisher: OECD Publications
The above information outlines module EC517: "Cost Benefit Analysis & Evaluation" and is valid from 2020 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional MD515: Systematic Review Methods


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

This online/blended course about research synthesis focuses on comparisons between alternative interventions. Interactive learning modules, required readings, discussion boards, tutorials, and assignments will be used to highlight rigorous systematic review methods, such as searching for potentially relevant articles, selecting primary studies using explicit, reproducible criteria, appraisal of study architecture, quantitative data synthesis and interpretation.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Critically discuss the role of systematic reviews within the context of evidence generation and evidence based health care
  2. Identify the key stages of the systematic review process;
  3. Develop a review question and understand how to develop a review protocol
  4. Identify and develop appropriate search methods for identification of studies including the development of a comprehensive search strategy
  5. Critically appraise the quality of included studies using methods appropriate to included study design types
  6. Critically explore the principles of data synthesis and recognise the relevance of different methods of synthesis to different study designs
  7. Explore methods for statistical (meta-analysis) and non-statistical synthesis of data/findings
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module MD515: "Systematic Review Methods" and is valid from 2018 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional EC5125: Environmental Gerontology and Ageing in Place Policy


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

This module will analyse the significance of older people’s environments, and their interactions and relationships with these environments, for older adult well-being and for the effectiveness of policy and practice implementation. Students will explore the major theoretical perspectives on environmental gerontology and ageing in place that underlie contemporary policy approaches to ageing and older people. The module will seek to illustrate how older people’s experiences in place can reflect a complex interchange of micro personal circumstances and the immediate home environment, meso neighbourhood and community contexts and macro national and international structures. In doing so, students will learn about the influence of changes processes (e.g. rural economic and social transformation; gentrification and development) on the diverse residential contexts of older people, and adaptive and place-making strategies engaged in by older people in response to these changes. The effectiveness of current policy and practice approaches related to age-friendly and liveable communities, and community-based service provision, will be assessed against these circumstances.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Critically evaluate theoretical perspectives on environmental gerontology and ageing in place and their relevance for ageing policy.
  2. Assess the effectiveness and impact of major international and national policy frameworks focusing on older people and their environments.
  3. Understand the linkage between global, national and local scalar environments, and the capacity of contemporary policy approaches to account for these linkages and their implications for diverse groups of older people, in diverse place contexts.
  4. Assess the role of place in mediating multifaceted outcomes in later life, and its potential as a platform for policy and practice intervention
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Written Assessment (50%)
  • Oral, Audio Visual or Practical Assessment (50%)
Module Director
Reading List
  1. "Geographical Gerontology: Concepts and Approaches" by Skinner, A., Andrews, G. & Cutchin, M. (eds.)
    Publisher: Routledge: London & New York
  2. "Environmental Gerontology: Making Meaningful Places in Old Age" by Rowles, G. and Bernard, M. (eds.)
    Publisher: Springer Publishing Company
The above information outlines module EC5125: "Environmental Gerontology and Ageing in Place Policy" and is valid from 2020 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Why Choose This Course?

Career Opportunities

Graduates will have in-depth analytical skills sets which will enhance their employability in general and age specific public policy organisations. Graduates are likely to find employment as policy analysts, managers and researchers in government and public bodies; policy and strategic planners in civil society organisations; service coordinators; senior staff in private age-related organisations. This course will serve as an excellent grounding to pursue a Ph D programme.

Unique programme internationally

Currently, there is no Master’s programme offering this specific topic in Ireland, and a lack of such programmes on ageing and policy in Europe. Typically, at a European level, existing programmes employ a general gerontological perspective and lack a public policy focus. This marks a substantial gap in programme development, and one that the College of Business, Public Policy and Law (CBPPL) is committed to addressing through its leadership on scholarship and teaching in this area.

Ageing represents a significant research theme within the College of Business, Public Policy and Law. This is reflected both in research output and research income. The programme is distinctive in its positioning within a research informed ageing and public policy pedagogical environment. Hosted by the ICSG, the programme will be linked directly to state-of-the-art research programmes, led by international experts (Kieran Walsh; Aine Ni Leime; Eamon O’Shea) in ageing and policy, with findings and experiences from these studies informing module content and approaches. In addition the programme is delivered in collaboration with international policy experts, such as (Nena Georgantzi, AGE Platform Europe; Patricia Conboy, HelpAge International.

J.E. Cairnes School of Business & Economics MSc Ageing and Public Policy merit scholarship

Details of Scholarships for the Masters in Economics programmes will be available in Spring 2021. MSc in Ageing and Public Policy students commencing September 2021 are eligible to apply for these scholarships. For more information on the scholarship application process, please contact business@nuigalway.ie

Who’s Suited to This Course

National, European and international students from public and social policy bachelor degree programmes from across commerce and economics, law, sociology, management, gender studies and psychology disciplines who wish to gain expertise and transferable skills in public policy, and in ageing.

Level 8 students from gerontological specific programmes in European universities, who wish to continue their ageing studies in an English-speaking and research-led interdisciplinary learning environment.

Policy stakeholders, civil servants and service practitioners from national, European and international public and third sector agencies in sectors relevant to ageing.

Learning Outcomes

 

Work Placement

Study Abroad

Related Student Organisations

Course Fees

Fees: EU

€6,600 p.a. 2020/21

Fees: Tuition

€6,376 p.a. 2020/21

Fees: Student levy

€224 p.a. 2020/21

Fees: Non EU

€16,500 p.a. 2020/21

EU 1MEP2, part-time: €3,355 p.a. 

Find out More

Programme Director:
Prof. Kieran Walsh
Irish Centre for Social Gerontology
T: +353 91 495 460
E: kieran.walsh@nuigalway.ie


What policy experts and stakeholders say

Mairead

Mairead McGuinness |   MEP and Vice-President of the European Parliament

Living a long, healthy and happy life is what most of us wish for. Yet as we age, we can lose independence, be treated differently and feel left behind and left out. We need to rethink how we look at the ageing process and how we respond to it. This course is an important one which will help those who undertake it to look at the challenge of a growing older adult population and find solutions which respect the dignity and rights of older people.
Dr. Alexandre

Dr. Alexandre Sidorenko |   European Centre for Social Welfare Policy & Research

Adjusting to ageing society envisages translating the research findings, international policy frameworks and national programmes into concrete actions. There are too few professionals who can lead such efforts, and it is a major gap in national and international capacity on ageing. The Irish Centre for Social Gerontology of NUI Galway is well positioned to fill this gap. It is high time to do it
Anne-Sophie

Anne-Sophie Parent |   Secretary General, AGE Platform Europe

AGE Platform Europe welcomes the launch of NUI Galway new MSc programme on Ageing and Public Policy. In today’s context of rapid demographic ageing and increased digitalisation, policy makers need guidance to develop innovative policies to address the societal concerns interconnected with population ageing. This new Master programme is the first in Ireland to take a comprehensive approach to engage older people in societies and eradicate inequalities in old age.
Robert

Robert Anderson |   Head of Unit, Social Policies, Eurofound

Eurofound is an EU Agency providing knowledge on living and working conditions to policy makers, specifically at EU level. Our work programmes consistently emphasise the importance of demographic change and the life course perspective; and the links between ageing of the workforce and ageing of the general population. There is a growing need for people skilled in relating results of research on ageing to diverse policy themes. Therefore, I welcome the MSc in Ageing and Public Policy.
Prof. Thomas

Prof. Thomas Scharf |   Prof. Thomas Scharf Professor of Social Gerontology, Newcast

Around the world, countries are responding in remarkably different ways to the opportunities and challenges associated with ageing populations. This type of academic programme is of great value to students who are keen to deepen their knowledge of the many ways in which public policy is able to address demographic change.

Feedback from Industry:

Norah Keating

"To reap the dividends of population ageing we must reduce social exclusion of older persons. This masters programme in Ageing and Public Policy will build much-needed capacity in policy development and analysis toward leaving no one behind. "

Prof. Norah Keating, Director, Global Social Issues on Ageing

 

Downloads

  • Postgraduate Taught Prospectus 2021

    Postgraduate Taught Prospectus 2021 PDF (11.3MB)

  • Ageing & Public Policy Flyer" alt="MSc Ageing and Public Policy Flyer"/>

    MSc Ageing and Public Policy Flyer PDF (21MB)