Course Overview

The MA in Digital Media provides advanced creative and technical education in digital media within a supportive environment. Students are given practical training across a range of digital media practices, whilst also developing their creative, critical and entrepreneurial skills within small-group classes. Classes contain a mix of graduates from relevant academic backgrounds and industry professionals who want to develop or extend existing skills.

Scholarships available
Find out about our Postgraduate Scholarships here.

Applications and Selections

Applications are made online via the NUI Galway Postgraduate Applications System

In addition to the online application, please include a portfolio of existing digital work and ideas for two projects you may potentially develop while studying with us.

To see, in advance, what supporting documents are required to supplement your online application please visit: www.nuigalway.ie/postgrad-admissions/supportingdocuments/ 

Who Teaches this Course

Requirements and Assessment

Assessments on the programme are designed to develop students’ technical and creative skills, as well as their ability to undertake individual and group work and to critically assess their own work and that of their peers. Assessment is by both practical and written tasks, and includes presentations, reports, and multimedia projects. The MA culminates is the end-of-year digital media project, which gives students the opportunity to specialise in a specific area of the programme and develop their technical skills and creativity in a real-world context. In addition, students complete a minor dissertation. These assessments and projects also contribute towards a practical portfolio of digital media work.

 

Key Facts

Entry Requirements

NQAI Level 8 degree or equivalent H2.2, GPA 3.0 or international qualification. IELTS score of 6.5 or equivalent if applicable. Students who do not meet the honours degree requirement but have a Level 7 degree (Merit 2) may be admitted to the PDip course with the possibility of progressing to the MA if they receive a minimum of 60% in their course work during the year.

Additional supporting documentation is required. For more details click here

 


Additional Requirements

Duration

1 year, full-time

Next start date

September 2021

A Level Grades ()

Average intake

14

NFQ level

Mode of study

Taught

ECTS weighting

MA—90, PGDip—60

Award

MA, PDip. Students may only apply for the MA. Those who do not meet the minimum entry requirements may be admitted via a qualifying exam, or be admitted to the PDip.

CAO

Course code

1MDM1

Course Outline

The course is a full-time, 12-month programme, which runs from September to August of each year. It is split into three semesters, with modules engaging with different aspects of digital media practice and theory. Emphasis is placed on advanced creative practice as well as reflexive engagement with tools and technologies. Semester 1 and 2 are comprised of core modules and a group of electives, enabling each student to tailor the degree to their own individual needs (note that not all modules may be offered each year). 

The final semester is dedicated to the design, development and testing of students’ end-of-year projects, involving practice-based research, as well as a 5,000 word accompanying dissertation. Each student is assigned an expert supervisor for guidance throughout the project development process.

Curriculum Information

Curriculum information relates to the current academic year (in most cases).
Course and module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Glossary of Terms

Credits
You must earn a defined number of credits (aka ECTS) to complete each year of your course. You do this by taking all of its required modules as well as the correct number of optional modules to obtain that year's total number of credits.
Module
An examinable portion of a subject or course, for which you attend lectures and/or tutorials and carry out assignments. E.g. Algebra and Calculus could be modules within the subject Mathematics. Each module has a unique module code eg. MA140.
Optional
A module you may choose to study.
Required
A module that you must study if you choose this course (or subject).
Semester
Most courses have 2 semesters (aka terms) per year.

Year 1 (90 Credits)

Required DM6108: Interactive and Immersive Media (Remote Delivery)


Semester 1 | Credits: 10

This module aims to equip the students with a solid foundation in digital media production packages. Lectures will explain the working principles of various software packages (updated to match industry standards), including practical workshops to demonstrate the function and practical usage of these packages when developing interactive and immersive projects.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand the process of content creation using various software platforms
  2. Develop and apply working methods that integrate different softwares
  3. Apply knowledge of interactive and human-centred design to project development
  4. Develop and apply understanding of media as immersive environment
  5. Develop methods of receiving, presenting, and responding feedback to peers in a constructive environment through iterative processes
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "The Design of Everyday Things" by Dan Norman
    Publisher: Basic Books
  2. "Interaction Design: Beyond Human Computer Interaction" by Sharp, H., Rogers, Y., Preece, J.
    Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
  3. "Radical Technologies: The Design of Everyday Life" by Adam Greenfield
    Publisher: Verso
  4. "Multimedia Foundations: Core Concepts for Digital Design" by Vic Costello
    Publisher: Routledge
  5. "Foundations of digital art and design with Adobe Creative Cloud" by xtine burrough
    Publisher: New Riders
The above information outlines module DM6108: "Interactive and Immersive Media (Remote Delivery)" and is valid from 2020 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required DM6106: Creative Practice for Digital Makers (Remote Delivery)


Semester 1 | Credits: 10

Creative Practice for Makers is a process module exploring different methodologies and work flows involved in digital production. The module starts with an intensive, several day bootcamp session during the first week of the term, followed by regularly scheduled classes. The module encourages students to expand their awareness of digital media projects, practitioners and technologies and reflect on their social and cultural impact. It encourages students to identify personal interests in creative media and digital technologies. The module explore both individual assessment and collaborative work.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Productively utilise creative process generation tools and methodologies.
  2. Demonstrate an application of methodologies through project generation process.
  3. Identify and critically engage with key issues affecting digital media and the Creative and Culture Industries.
  4. Understand and implement ethical practices for creative media production, including copyright legislation, fair use, and health and safety.
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Department-based Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Understanding New Media" by Eugenia Siapera
    ISBN: 978-1-4739-43.
    Publisher: Sage
  2. "Exploratory Programming for the Arts and Humanities" by Nick Montfort
    Publisher: MIT Press
  3. "Design Justice: Community-Led Practices to Build the Worlds We Need" by Sasha Costanza-Chock
    Publisher: MIT Press
  4. "Speculative Everything: Design, Fiction, and Social Dreaming" by Anthony Dunne and Fiona Raby
    Publisher: MIT Press
  5. "The Creative Industries - From Theory to Practice" by Davies and Sigthorsson
    Publisher: Sage
The above information outlines module DM6106: "Creative Practice for Digital Makers (Remote Delivery)" and is valid from 2020 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required DM6105: Digital Media: Final Project


15 months long | Credits: 30

This module is the major project for MA Digital Media. It is a practice based research project where students choose an area of personal interest either directly relevant to Digital Media or using Digital Media as a way to investigate a specific area, develop a project, or to create a product. Each student/project is supported by a supervisor.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Identify and investigate a worthwhile problem or question and use this as stimulus to produce a digital media project.
  2. Demonstrate a practice based approach to a digital media project.
  3. Demonstrate relevant methodologies and research methods for the project.
  4. Create a research based practical project supported by a written report.
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Research (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "MLA Handbook" by Modern Language Association of America
    ISBN: 9781603292627.
    Publisher: Modern Language Association
  2. "Practice-Based Design Research" by Laurene Vaughan
    ISBN: 9781350080409.
    Publisher: Bloomsbury Visual Arts
  3. "Knowings and Knots: Methodologies and Ecologies in Research-Creation" by Natalie Loveless
    ISBN: 978177212485.
    Publisher: University of Alberta Press
  4. "How to Make Art at the End of the World" by Natalie Loveless
    ISBN: 9781478004028.
    Publisher: Duke University Press
The above information outlines module DM6105: "Digital Media: Final Project" and is valid from 2020 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required FM6102: Digital Play & Practice


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

This module aims to explore the landscape of current innovations in digital media technologies across a range of arts disciplines. The module will explore emerging technologies in digital arts and media, examining historical precedence in creative innovation and considering on-going experimentations. Students will utilise a practice-based research approach to develop experimental project prototypes.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Comprehend and describe key issues and debates surrounding the development and evolution of new media technologies.
  2. Demonstrate competence in the creation and production of a piece of digital media project.
  3. Demonstrate competence in problem solving, creative and strategic thinking.
  4. Consider and evaluate their own work in a reflexive manner, with reference to academic and/or professional issues and debates.
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Digital Art" by Paul, Christiane
    Publisher: Thames and Hudson
  2. "Aesthetics of interaction in digital art" by Katja Kwastek
    Publisher: MIT Press
  3. "The metainterface: the art of platforms, cities, and clouds" by Chris Andersen and Soren Pold
    Publisher: MIT Press
  4. "Enfoldment and Infinity: An Islamic Genealogy of New Media Art" by Laura U. Marks
    Publisher: MIT Press
  5. "Geomedia: Networked Cities and the Future of Public Space" by Scott McQuire
    Publisher: Polity Press
  6. "Garments of Paradise: Wearable Discourse in the Digital Age" by Susan Elizabeth Ryan
    Publisher: MIT Press
The above information outlines module FM6102: "Digital Play & Practice" and is valid from 2020 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required DM6102: Online and Mobile Media


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

The objective of this module is to provide students with an overview of various aspects of online and mobile media, including content creation, interface design and use, and other tools and techniques based on industry standards. Students will be equipped to work and further develop in a rapidly-changing media environment
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand the mechanisms and technologies driving online and mobile media
  2. Understand major concepts behind Social Networking and Recommendation Systems
  3. Develop online content, including still and moving image, text, and digital objects
  4. Apply industry standards and up-to-date research to interface design and development
  5. Use existing tools to set up online site or app
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Understanding New Media" by Eugenia Siapera
    Publisher: Sage
  2. "Foundations of digital art and design with Adobe Creative Cloud" by xtine burroughs
    Publisher: New Riders
  3. "Smartphones as Locative Media" by Jordan Frith
    Publisher: Polity Press
  4. "Geomedia: Networked Cities and the Future of Public Space" by Scott McQuire
    Publisher: Polity Press
The above information outlines module DM6102: "Online and Mobile Media" and is valid from 2020 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional DJ6132: Digital Sandbox


Semester 1 | Credits: 10

The aim of this module is to introduce students to computer coding applications to produce creative works that can fulfill audience needs and market demand. Students will explore relevant areas of creative practices and the advanced technologies that provide new possibilities to problem-solve, disrupt, generate content as well as a means of promoting and distributing their works.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the essentials of technical writing
  2. Develop skills using appropriate coding languages for media
  3. Display knowledge of the object-oriented programming paradigm and be able to develop simple, well-structured programs in an appropriate high-level object-oriented language.
  4. Acquire problem-solving capacities through the use of problem-based learning (PBL) and design thinking
  5. Acquire knowledge of relevant theories and scholarship in the area of creative media technology
  6. Learn to work in multidisciplinary teams and communicate effectively
  7. Reflect on the impact of your work on society through appropriate theoretical frameworks including ethical issues and data privacy.
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Learn Python Programming" by Fabrizio Romano
    ISBN: 9781788996662.
    Publisher: Packt Publishing
  2. "HTML and CSS" by Jon Duckett
    ISBN: 9781118008188.
    Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
  3. "JavaScript and JQuery" by Jon Duckett
    ISBN: 9781118531648.
    Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
  4. "Creative Coding in Python" by Sheena Vaidyanathan
    ISBN: 9781631595813.
    Publisher: Quarry Books
The above information outlines module DJ6132: "Digital Sandbox" and is valid from 2020 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional DM6100: Moving Image Techniques


Semester 1 | Credits: 10

In this module, students use various moving image techniques and methods, including shooting and editing video, sound production, animation, and preparing content for different outputs.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate understanding of concepts and aesthetics underlying moving image using digital technologies
  2. Develop skills for recording moving image and sound
  3. Operate multichannel editing software for video, animation and sound.
  4. Create content for a range of public outputs, including online and mobile media, screen, and non-traditional formats
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Multimedia foundations: core concepts for digital design" by Vic Costello
    Publisher: Routledge
  2. "Foundations of Digital Art and Design with Adobe Creative Cloud" by xtine burrough
    Publisher: New Riders
  3. "Moving Image" by Omar Kholeif
    Publisher: MIT Press
  4. "Audio-Vision: Sound on Screen" by Michel Chion
    Publisher: Columbia University Press
The above information outlines module DM6100: "Moving Image Techniques" and is valid from 2020 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional DM6103: Interactive and Immersive Media


Semester 1 | Credits: 10

This module aims to equip the students with a solid foundation in digital media production packages. Lectures will explain the working principles of various software packages (updated to match industry standards), including practical workshops to demonstrate the function and practical usage of these packages when developing interactive and immersive projects.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand the process of content creation using various software platforms
  2. Develop and apply working methods that integrate different softwares
  3. Apply knowledge of interactive and human-centred design to project development
  4. Develop and apply understanding of media as immersive environment
  5. Develop methods of receiving, presenting, and responding feedback to peers in a constructive environment through iterative processes
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "The Design of Everyday Things" by Dan Norman
    Publisher: Basic Books
  2. "Interaction Design: Beyond Human Computer Interaction" by Sharp, H., Rogers, Y., Preece, J.
    Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
  3. "Radical Technologies: The Design of Everyday Life" by Adam Greenfield
    Publisher: Verso
  4. "Multimedia Foundations: Core Concepts for Digital Design" by Vic Costello
    Publisher: Routledge
  5. "Foundations of digital art and design with Adobe Creative Cloud" by xtine burrough
    Publisher: New Riders
The above information outlines module DM6103: "Interactive and Immersive Media" and is valid from 2020 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional DM6104: Creative Practice for Digital Makers


Semester 1 | Credits: 10

Creative Practice for Makers is a process module exploring different methodologies and work flows involved in digital production. The module starts with an intensive, several day bootcamp session during the first week of the term, followed by regularly scheduled classes. The module encourages students to expand their awareness of digital media projects, practitioners and technologies and reflect on their social and cultural impact. It encourages students to identify personal interests in creative media and digital technologies. The module explore both individual assessment and collaborative work.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Productively utilise creative process generation tools and methodologies.
  2. Demonstrate an application of methodologies through project generation process.
  3. Identify and critically engage with key issues affecting digital media and the Creative and Culture Industries.
  4. Understand and implement ethical practices for creative media production, including copyright legislation, fair use, and health and safety.
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "The art of critical making: Rhode Island School of Design on creative practice" by Hermano and Somerson
    Publisher: John Wiley and Sons
  2. "Art Thinking: How to Carve Out Creative Schedules in a World of Schedules, Budgets, and Bosses" by Amy Whitaker
    Publisher: Harper Business
  3. "Exploratory Programming for the Arts and Humanities" by Nick Montfort
    Publisher: MIT Press
  4. "Speculative Everything: Design, Fiction, and Social Dreaming" by Anthony Dunne and Fiona Raby
    Publisher: MIT Press
  5. "The Creative Industries - From Theory to Practice" by Davies and Sigthorsson
    Publisher: Sage
The above information outlines module DM6104: "Creative Practice for Digital Makers" and is valid from 2020 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional DM6110: Online and Mobile Media (Remote Delivery)


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

The objective of this module is to provide students with an overview of various aspects of online and mobile media, including content creation, interface design and use, and other tools and techniques based on industry standards. Students will be equipped to work and further develop in a rapidly-changing media environment
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand the mechanisms and technologies driving online and mobile media
  2. Understand major concepts behind Social Networking and Recommendation Systems
  3. Develop online content, including still and moving image, text, and digital objects
  4. Apply industry standards and up-to-date research to interface design and development
  5. Use existing tools to set up online site or app
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Understanding New Media" by Eugenia Siapera
    Publisher: Sage
  2. "Foundations of digital art and design with Adobe Creative Cloud" by xtine burroughs
    Publisher: New Riders
  3. "Smartphones as Locative Media" by Jordan Frith
    Publisher: Polity Press
  4. "Geomedia: Networked Cities and the Future of Public Space" by Scott McQuire
    Publisher: Polity Press
The above information outlines module DM6110: "Online and Mobile Media (Remote Delivery)" and is valid from 2020 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional DM6107: Digital Play & Practice (Remote Delivery)


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

This module aims to explore the landscape of current innovations in digital media technologies across a range of arts disciplines. The module will explore emerging technologies in digital arts and media, examining historical precedence in creative innovation and considering on-going experimentations. Students will utilise a practice-based research approach to develop experimental project prototypes.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Comprehend and describe key issues and debates surrounding the development and evolution of new media technologies.
  2. Demonstrate competence in the creation and production of a piece of digital media project.
  3. Demonstrate competence in problem solving, creative and strategic thinking.
  4. Consider and evaluate their own work in a reflexive manner, with reference to academic and/or professional issues and debates.
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Digital Art" by Paul, Christiane
    Publisher: Thames and Hudson
  2. "Aesthetics of interaction in digital art" by Katja Kwastek
    Publisher: MIT Press
  3. "The metainterface: the art of platforms, cities, and clouds" by Chris Andersen and Soren Pold
    Publisher: MIT Press
  4. "Enfoldment and Infinity: An Islamic Genealogy of New Media Art" by Laura U. Marks
    Publisher: MIT Press
  5. "Geomedia: Networked Cities and the Future of Public Space" by Scott McQuire
    Publisher: Polity Press
  6. "Garments of Paradise: Wearable Discourse in the Digital Age" by Susan Elizabeth Ryan
    Publisher: MIT Press
The above information outlines module DM6107: "Digital Play & Practice (Remote Delivery)" and is valid from 2020 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional DM6101: Education Technologies


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

This module is an exploration of how digital technologies and networked culture are influencing how we learn. There are many different opinions with regard to how technology should be used to support learning and instruction. Deciding which are relevant and how they are best deployed is a complex and challenging task. Looking through the lens of available software applications, social media, mobile devices and apps, students will explore how their own learning and others is shaped and changed by their digital activities. Key theoretical readings become topics for deeper discussion around our evolving understanding of learning in a networked age, and the design implications of this. Students will both discuss these issues and participate in practical design activities, developing educational multimedia such as podcasts and video resources, amongst others.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. demonstrate a critical understanding of a range of theoretical and design perspectives which have been developed to understand learning;
  2. identify and explore the emergence of new e-learning innovations; have a critical awareness of the impact of such practices in terms of pedagogy and usability
  3. have developed practical skills in creating, developing and evaluating educational multimedia resources
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Department-based Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Education and Technology: Key Issues and Debates" by Neil Selwyn
    ISBN: 9781474235921.
    Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC
The above information outlines module DM6101: "Education Technologies" and is valid from 2020 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional EN6128: Publishing: Perspectives and Professionalisation


Semester 1 and Semester 2 | Credits: 10

The module contains four interwoven strands of content: 1) ‘On Publishing’ Guest Speaker Series; 2) Professional Skills; 3) Academic Skills; 4) Adobe InDesign Skills. Although this module continues to meet regularly throughout semester 2 of the academic year, the majority of the contact hours and assessments take place during semester 1. Thus, for the purposes of registration, students should treat this as a semester 1 module.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Converse knowledgeably about current and historical trends and the wide variety of roles within the publishing industry.
  2. Craft an excellent cv and cover letter and undertake a professional interview.
  3. Show an awareness of personal digital branding and implement basic blogging and podcasting skills.
  4. Exhibit facility with Adobe InDesign.
  5. Write an effective project abstract, master a relevant citation system, and conduct a review of scholarly literature on a given topic.
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module EN6128: "Publishing: Perspectives and Professionalisation" and is valid from 2020 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional DM6109: Moving Image: Online Pratice


Semester 1 | Credits: 10

In this module, students use various moving image techniques and methods, including shooting and editing video, sound production, animation, and preparing content for different outputs.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate understanding of concepts and aesthetics underlying moving image using digital technologies
  2. Develop skills for recording moving image and sound
  3. Operate multichannel editing software for video, animation and sound.
  4. Create content for a range of public outputs, including online and mobile media, screen, and non-traditional formats
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Multimedia foundations: core concepts for digital design" by Vic Costello
    Publisher: Routledge
  2. "Foundations of Digital Art and Design with Adobe Creative Cloud" by xtine burrough
    Publisher: New Riders
  3. "Moving Image" by Omar Kholeif
    Publisher: MIT Press
  4. "Audio-Vision: Sound on Screen" by Michel Chion
    Publisher: Columbia University Press
The above information outlines module DM6109: "Moving Image: Online Pratice" and is valid from 2020 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional EN6119: Culture Society Technology


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

Postgraduate introduction to issues and problems in the relationships among culture, society and technology. The course will examine the impact of technologies, especially digital technologies, from cultural, political, ethical, legal and other points of view.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Describe key aspects of the historical impact of technology on culture, creativity and society, with particular focus on the digital age.
  2. Analyse and critique a range of theoretical debates associated with the interrelations of culture, society and technology.
  3. Evaluate the effect of technologies (especially digital technologies) on aspects of contemporary life.
  4. Describe key legal and ethical issues that arise in the use of new technologies.
  5. Compare ways in which the relations between culture and technology have been described and understood by a selection of writers and theorists of the present and past.
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Digital play" by Stephen Kline, Nick Dyer-Witheford and Greig de Peuter
    ISBN: 0773525912.
    Publisher: Montr?eal ; McGill-Queen's University Press, 2003.
  2. "Wired shut" by Tarleton Gillespie
    ISBN: 0262072823.
    Publisher: MIT Press
  3. "Personal connections in the digital age" by Nancy Baym
    ISBN: 0745643329.
    Publisher: Polity
The above information outlines module EN6119: "Culture Society Technology" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional DJ6133: Data Journalism and Visualisation


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

In this module students will learn a range of techniques for sourcing, analysing, and visually representing data-based stories, through practice-driven learning.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Develop stories that rely on leveraging the internet as a research tool and production space.
  2. Select and use appropriate analytical tools for a particular task to analyse database stories.
  3. Generate narrative storylines from patterns identified in large data sets.
  4. Analyse data using appropriate statistical techniques.
  5. Use appropriate visualisation tools to communicate complex data-based narratives to audiences effectively.
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Data Journalism: Inside the Global Future" by Tom Felle
    ISBN: 9781845496630.
    Publisher: Theschoolbook.com
  2. "The Digital Reporter's Notebook" by Blaine, Mark
    ISBN: 9780415898614.
    Publisher: Routledge
  3. "Practicing Convergence Journalism" by Janet Kolodzy
    ISBN: 9780415890304.
    Publisher: Routledge
  4. "The Investigative Reporter's Handbook" by Brant Houston
    ISBN: 0312589972.
    Publisher: Bedford/St Martins
  5. "Principles of Convergent Journalism" by Jeffrey S. Wilkinson, August E. Grant, Douglas J. Fisher
    ISBN: 9780199838653.
    Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  6. "The Online Journalism Handbook" by Bradshaw, Paul and Liisa Rohumaa
    ISBN: 9781405873406.
  7. "The Multimedia Journalist" by Jennifer George-Palilonis
    ISBN: 9780199764525.
    Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  8. "Online Journalism" by James C. Foust
    ISBN: 9781934432174.
    Publisher: Holcomb Hathaway, Publishers
  9. "Producing Online News" by Ryan Thornburg
    ISBN: 9781604269963.
    Publisher: CQ Press College
The above information outlines module DJ6133: " Data Journalism and Visualisation" and is valid from 2020 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional DJ6131: Global Media Innovation


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

This module will equip students with the professional knowledge and capacity needed to transition into the fast-changing media industry. Students will develop the knowledge and understanding necessary to create innovative ideas; to help bring fresh thinking to a media organisation; to create dynamic content for a start-up enterprise; or to launch their own product.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the relationships between editorial, audiences and revenue sources, and the impact of financial considerations on editorial decision making.
  2. Effectively analyse the opportunities afforded by industry disruption.
  3. Work independently and collectively to identify, analyse and develop an entrepreneurial solution to a journalistic need.
  4. Identify the commercial viability of a new media innovation or product.
  5. Work successfully as part of a team.
  6. Reflect on personal strengths and develop self-awareness of areas for improvement.
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Digital Transformation in Journalism and News Media" by Mike Friedrichsen,Yahya Kamalipour
    ISBN: 9783319277868.
    Publisher: Springer
  2. "Becoming a reflective practitioner" by Christopher Johns ; with contributions from Sally Burnie ... [et al.].
    ISBN: 0470674261.
    Publisher: ; Wiley-Blackwell
  3. "The Art of Innovation" by Tom Kelley
    ISBN: 9781781256145.
  4. "Communicative Figurations" by Andreas Hepp,Andreas Breiter,Uwe Hasebrink
    ISBN: 9783319655840.
    Publisher: Springer
The above information outlines module DJ6131: "Global Media Innovation" and is valid from 2020 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Why Choose This Course?

Career Opportunities

Why choose this Course?

The range of skills and topics covered on the programme, as well as the different backgrounds of the students on it, contribute towards an environment rich in peer-learning, multidisciplinary experiences and cross-pollination of ideas and skills. Drawing together technical production and theoretical inquiry through practice-based research, students in this programme are trained to be creative innovators. Furthermore, as a student at the Huston School you will be part of a collaborative creative community, interacting with students across a range of Media programmes through shared modules and events. You will also have all the opportunities which come from studying at one of the world’s top Universities, including access to a range of seminars and high-profile guest speakers, and digital media practitioners.

Career opportunities

The career paths from this course are limitless, and our graduates are sought after by a wide range of industries. Areas that former gradutes are currently working in include television production, IT, graphic and interaction design, web design and development and higher-education. A number of graduates have carried on to undertake PhD research, whilst others have utilised the creative and entrepreneurial skills developed on the course to develop their final projects into business opportunities.

Who’s Suited to This Course

This course suits students with some experience working with digital technologies who would like to further develop their practice as creative producers, innovators, and entrepreneurs, providing them with the flexibility required to work in today’s rapidly changing media environment.  

Learning Outcomes

 

Work Placement

Study Abroad

Related Student Organisations

Course Fees

Fees: EU

€5,750 p.a. 2021/22

Fees: Tuition

€5,526 p.a. 2021/22

Fees: Student levy

€224 p.a. 2021/22

Fees: Non EU

€15,550 p.a. 2020/21

Please note:  The fee payable by EU students is listed under "Fees: EU".  This field is the sum of the student levy + tuition.  Fees are payable each year and are subject to change year-on year.

Postgraduate students in receipt of a SUSI grant—please note an F4 grant is where SUSI will pay €2,000 towards your tuition.  You will be liable for the remainder of the total fee.  An F5 grant is where SUSI will pay TUITION up to a maximum of €6,270.  SUSI will not cover the student levy of €224.

Find out More

Dr El Putnam 
T: +353 91 494 264
E: el.putnam@nuigalway.ie

Quick Links

 


What Our Students Say

Alan

Alan Murphy |   Currently working at EO Teilfís

An excellent course, covers a broad range of topics, very friendly lecturers, learned lots and expanded my knowledge base to many areas, which is essential in any job hunt. It was also enjoyable!
Dermot

Dermot Condron |   Currently working at Makin Media Mobile

I chose NUI Galway, as I had heard the teaching staff was excellent, and the University had great learning facilities. I wasn’t disappointed. The course provided me with the necessary skills-set for industry. The technical skills taught, such as web design, 2D and 3D animation, are all skills I am now putting into practice. As well as providing technical skills, the course has a theory side to it that gives understanding to how Digital Media Production as a process is informed by narrative analysis, cinematic traditions and creative discussion. The goal of the course is to combine creativity with technical ability that is useful from a business prospective. For me, the course achieved this ambition. The teaching staff was second to none. We had great facilities at the college, with our own computer room that we could work from. The class size was small, so we all got to know each other easily.
Shannon

Shannon Reeves |   MA Digital Media

The MA in Digital Media really is a unique course, not only because of the range of subjects taught (from databases to interactive design, e-learning and writing in the digital age) but also because of the range of backgrounds and skills that students bring to the course. Because everyone has different strengths and areas for improvement, and because we're learning such an array of skills and technologies, there's an inevitable community bond which grows up very quickly between members of the class, as everyone helps each other and contributes to classroom learning. We've also got a dedicated lab where we can work on our own computers, discuss our assignments, and even just socialise, which means there's a healthy mix of social and educational development as the year progresses.

2013

SHORTLISTED for the National Postgraduate Course of the Year Award

Best College of Arts & Social Sciences

Arts Education Winner Badge

Downloads

  • Postgraduate Taught Prospectus 2021

    Postgraduate Taught Prospectus 2021 PDF (11.3MB)