Course Overview

Drama students reading lines

The MA in Drama and Theatre Studies, housed at the O’Donoghue Centre for Drama, Theatre and Performance, is a world-leading course that combines critical perspectives on the practice of theatre history/theory with theatre-making. A diverse range of modules allows students to build a programme that suits their chosen career trajectory– whether in theatre practice, Irish drama, playwriting, theatre criticism, applied theatre or a blend.

As a student at the O’Donoghue Centre, you will benefit from being immersed in a supportive, invigorating community of world-class practitioners and scholars, whilst also being based in Galway, home to a vibrant arts and theatre scene.

This MA programme blends theoretical and practical approaches to the study of drama, and is particularly suited to applicants who wish to produce theatre publicly, write or review plays, teach drama, or carry out further academic research.  Applicants with a general interest in theatre are also very welcome. As a student on the course, you can benefit from NUI Galway’s unique partnership with Druid Theatre, recently described by The New York Times as “one of the world’s great theatre companies.” Led by Garry Hynes, participation in the Druid Academy involves masterclasses, and workshops as part of your degree.

Students can opt to take the course on a full-time (one year) basis or a part-time (two year) basis. 

Students in the Quad

Why choose this course?

The O’Donoghue Centre for Drama, Theatre and Performance is the most exciting place in the world to study and research Irish theatre.

We place strong emphasis on interacting with working theatre professionals, as shown by our exciting partnerships with Druid Theatre, Galway International Arts Festival, the Abbey Theatre, the Gate Theatre and many individuals and organisations. You can  take workshops as part of the Druid Academy; attend workshops with visiting practitioners; apply for the opportunity to complete an internship with leading theatre institutions such as the Abbey, Druid, Fishamble, Corn Exchange, or Rough Magic; and visit the theatre, both in Galway and Dublin.

Lecturers on the MA in Drama and Theatre Studies have internationally renowned expertise, especially in Irish drama, theatre, and performance; performance studies; intercultural theatre; theatre and feminisms; popular performance, theatre history and much more. We are also home to the Abbey and Gate Theatre Digital Archives, as well as the Druid, Siobhán McKenna, and Arthur Shields archives. 

Scholarships Available
Find out about our Postgraduate Scholarships here. 

MA Drama and Theatre 3

Applications and Selections

Applications are made online via the NUI Galway Postgraduate Applications System

Who Teaches this Course

Dr Catherine Morris isFellow in Theatre and Performance & Lecturer in Culture, Community and the University, teaches modules that draw extensively from the theatre archives. Her book Alice Milligan and the Irish Cultural Revival uncovered the feminist theatre practice of one of the most significant founders of modern Ireland. As a curator, she collaborates internationally devising exhibition interventions that include the Irish Museum of Modern Art’s El Lissitzky: the Artists and the State. Current research includes curation as performance, autobiography & the city, staging Europe in Ireland. 

Max Hafler began his professional life as an actor, training at LAMDA. He is a theatre tutor, director and writer who now specialises primarily in Michael Chekhov Technique and Voice. He trained in Chekhov Technique at MICHA and Michael Chekhov Europe. His book, Teaching Voice, was published by Nick Hern Books in 2016 and his next, on Chekhov Technique, Shakespeare and young actors is due out in late 2019. Of his many productions, his most recent professional production was for The Sacrificial Wind, a poem-play by Lorna Shaughnessy which played in Cuirt and at the Heaney Centre NI.

Dr Miriam Haughton is Director of Postgraduate Studies in Drama, Theatre and Performance. Author of Staging Trauma: Bodies in Shadow, she has also co-edited Radical Contemporary Theatre Practices by Women in Ireland, and published in Contemporary Theatre Review, Modern Drama, New Theatre Quarterly, Irish Studies Review, Mortality, Irish Theatre International and Ilha Do Desterro as well as multiple collections. Miriam established the Feminist Storytelling Network at NUI Galway, and previously worked in theatre, television and film production in Ireland and the UK.

Garry Hynes (Adjunct Professor in Drama) is the artistic director of Druid Theatre. Outside of her work with Druid, she has worked with The Abbey and Gate Theatres (Ireland) and internationally with the Royal Shakespeare Company and the Royal Court in the UK, and with Second Stage, Signature Theater and Manhattan Theater Club in New York; and with The Kennedy Centre in Washington. The recipient of multiple awards, she was the first female director to win a Tony Award in 1998.

Patrick Lonergan is Professor of Drama and Theatre Studies, and a member of the Royal Irish Academy. He has edited or written eleven books on Irish theatre, the most recent of which is Irish Drama and Theatre Since 1950 (Bloomsbury, 2019). He is on the board of Galway International Arts Festival, and is co-editor of Methuen Drama ‘Critical Companions’ series. 

Dr Charlotte McIvor is the author of Migration and Performance in Contemporary Irish Theatre: Towards a New Interculturalism, co-editor of volumes including Interculturalism and Performance Now, Devised Performance in Irish Theatre and Staging Intercultural Ireland: Plays and Practitioner Perspectives, and currently involved in a large-scale multidisciplinary practice-as-research project which uses creative arts methods as tools of education regarding sexual consent.

Marianne Ni Chinneide is a lecturer in Drama, Theatre and Performance and Head of Production and Curation at The O' Donoghue Centre. Her interests include Theatre for Young Audiences, Irish language theatre, Ensemble Acting and Devising, Dance, and Theatre Business. She has 20 years professional experience as a producer and director in the Performing, Irish language and Traditional Arts.

Dr Máiréad Ní Chróinín is the Druid Artist in Residence. A Galway native, Máiréad Ní Chróinín established Moonfish Theatre, with her sister Ionia, in 2006. Moonfish have also created numerous works for young people, including Moonfish Pop-Up Worlds: Memory Paths, a project commissioned by Riverbank Arts Centre and Kildare Library Services, Tromluí Phinocchio/Pinocchio - a Nightmare, winner of the Stewart Parker New Irish Language Writing Award, and The Secret Garden. Dr Ní Chróinín is also an artist and researcher in the area of theatre and digital technology

Requirements and Assessment

There is continuous assessment through regular writing assignments, performance work and end-of-semester projects, comprising 60 credits. At the end of the second year, all students will complete a minor dissertation worth 30 credits.

Key Facts

Entry Requirements

A university arts degree (minimum standard 2.2, or US GPA 3.0). Students will be accepted on the basis of the degree result, a writing sample (5–6 pages)—which can be an academic essay, creative writing piece or theatre reviews—a personal statement outlining suitability for and interest in the programme, and names and contact details of two references. Applicants who do not meet the minimum entry requirements may be admitted via a qualifying exam if they have relevant professional experience, or may be admitted to the PDip. Students who do not meet the honours degree requirement but have a Level 7 degree (Merit 2) may be admitted to the PDip course with the possibility of progressing to the MA if they receive a minimum of 60% in their course work during the year.


Additional Requirements

Duration

1 year, full-time | 2 year, part-time

Next start date

September 2021

A Level Grades ()

Average intake

15 full-time places and 15 part-time places

Closing Date

Please see offer rounds webpage for details

NFQ level

Mode of study

Taught

ECTS weighting

90

Award

CAO

Course code

1DG1 full-time | 1DG2 part-time

Course Outline

All students take a core module that address critical perspectives and critical practice in Drama, Theatre and Performance.

 Students then choose optional modules from a variety of key areas, including:

  • Devising and theatre-making
  • Performance
  • Directing
  • Playwriting
  • Theatre business/producing
  • Applied Theatre
  • Modern and Contemporary Irish theatre
  • Writing about theatre
  • Archival research

At the end of the course, all students will complete a minor dissertation under the supervision of a member of staff.  Your minor dissertation can consist of original research or a practice-as-research project that might include the production of a play or creation of a new performance piece.

Curriculum Information

Curriculum information relates to the current academic year (in most cases).
Course and module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Glossary of Terms

Credits
You must earn a defined number of credits (aka ECTS) to complete each year of your course. You do this by taking all of its required modules as well as the correct number of optional modules to obtain that year's total number of credits.
Module
An examinable portion of a subject or course, for which you attend lectures and/or tutorials and carry out assignments. E.g. Algebra and Calculus could be modules within the subject Mathematics. Each module has a unique module code eg. MA140.
Optional
A module you may choose to study.
Required
A module that you must study if you choose this course (or subject).
Semester
Most courses have 2 semesters (aka terms) per year.

Year 1 (90 Credits)

Required DT6130: Critical Methods in Drama, Theatre and Performance


Semester 1 | Credits: 10

This course aims to develop students’ critical approaches to writing about theatre and performance. Different modes of ‘seeing’, analysing and writing on performance from semiotics to reception theory will be introduced and examined. Students will confront in class discussion and in essays issues related to writing on theatre such as the role of the critic, gender, globalisation and technology as well as the theoretical perspectives of postmodernism, psychoanalysis and theatre historiography. There will be visits to the theatre regularly (tickets will be provided) and students will be asked to write reviews and performance analysis of these productions. The course is ideally suited to those who wish to develop their writing and research skills, or to people who wish to develop careers in theatre criticism or research.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Survey approaches to analytical writing in the field of theatre and performance studies.
  2. Develop skills of literary and theoretical close-reading working with texts and performances in the field of theatre and performance studies.
  3. Experiment with a range of modes of analytical writing in the field of theatre and performance studies.
  4. Confront through class discussion and essay assignments the role of the critic, gender, globalisation and technology as well as the theoretical perspectives of postmodernism, psychoanalysis and theatre historiography.
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "The Cambridge Introduction to Theatre Studies" by Christopher B. Balme
    ISBN: 0521672236.
    Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  2. "Theatre Audiences" by Susan Bennett
    ISBN: 0415157234.
    Publisher: Psychology Press
  3. "The Transformative Power of Performance" by Erika Fischer-Lichte
    ISBN: 0415458560.
The above information outlines module DT6130: "Critical Methods in Drama, Theatre and Performance" and is valid from 2019 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required DT6100: Dissertation


15 months long | Credits: 30

Students carry out a research project, through theatre practice and/or conventional library or archive-based research. They will produce a work of original research on any aspect of Drama, Theatre and/or live performance.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Carry out an independent research project on a topic in the area of drama, theatre, performance
  2. Access and analyse relevant research materials in print and digital format in libraries, public institutions, digital resources, and/or archives
  3. Make use of research conventions in relation to citation and bibliography, in line with best international practice.
  4. write an extended work of up to 15,000 words on an original topic.
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module DT6100: "Dissertation" and is valid from 2018 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional DT6112: Advanced Theatre Production Practicum


12 months long | Credits: 10

This module integrates MA students into key theatrical production roles on productions staged with BA students in collaboration with staff or guest artist directors. Students contribute centrally to performance responsibilities related to acting, direction, dramaturgy, design and/or management that necessitate peer management and the creation of original content (including material for performance or performance/rehearsal management plans).
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Execute key responsibilities involved in specialized theatre roles such as stage manager, actor, designer.
  2. Administer one or more defined leadership roles within a live theatrical production from rehearsal through public performance as measured by key factors including management of peers, size of role, and independence of design process and execution as possible.
  3. Lead and organise innovative solutions to production problems.
  4. Supervise the delegation of responsibility for solving production problems to peers in consultation with team members and staff in artistic roles.
  5. Analyse theatre techniques and design materials including light, sound and costume in relationship to a complex and developed understanding of theatre history through engagement with independent research relevant to the production in final research essay.
  6. Articulate and probe the relationship between practical experience learned from previous production experiences with challenges and successes experienced during this process.
  7. Track and analyse the evolution of their individual and independently developed production concept such as original design, staging of a scene or movement sequence, or execution of a large acting role with demonstrable originality over the course of the entire process.
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "The director's craft" by Katie Mitchell
    ISBN: 0415404398.
    Publisher: Routledge
  2. "The Empty Space" by Peter Brook
    ISBN: 0141189223.
    Publisher: Penguin Books Ltd (UK)
  3. "Stage management" by Gail Pallin
    ISBN: 1848420145.
    Publisher: Nick Hern
  4. "The Cambridge introduction to scenography" by Joslin McKinney, Philip Butterworth
    ISBN: 0521612322.
    Publisher: Cambridge, UK ; Cambridge University Press, 2009.
  5. "The Routledge companion to theatre and performance" by Paul Allain and Jen Harvie
    ISBN: 0415257212.
    Publisher: London ; Routledge, 2006.
The above information outlines module DT6112: "Advanced Theatre Production Practicum" and is valid from 2020 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional DT6102: Irish Drama and Theatre from Wilde to O'Casey


Semester 1 | Credits: 10

This course explores the history of Irish drama and theatre from 1890 to 1930
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Identify, describe and analyse key moments in Irish theatre history from 1890 to 1930, with special focus on the Irish literary revival.
  2. produce a substantial research paper that deploys the skills of archival research, textual analysis and performance analysis.
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Modern and contemporary Irish drama" by edited by John P. Harrington
    ISBN: 0393932435.
    Publisher: W.W. Norton & Co.
  2. "The Irish Dramatic Revival: 1899-1939" by n/a
    ISBN: 978-140817528.
The above information outlines module DT6102: "Irish Drama and Theatre from Wilde to O'Casey" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional DT6123: Playwright's Workshop I


Semester 1 | Credits: 10

A weekly writer’s workshop in which students will explore fundamental dramaturgical playwriting strategies and structures through analysis of plays from different genres and in-class writing tasks.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Analyse and identify dramaturgical structures as well as particular genre specific theatrical devises
  2. Develop prompts for starting and completing written work
  3. Plan, structure and complete original short play
  4. Critically reflect on writing and situate it within established genres
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "The Secret Life of Plays" by Steve Waters
    Publisher: Nick Hern Books
  2. "How Plays Work" by David Edgar
    Publisher: Nick Hern
  3. "Playwriting a Practical guide" by Noel Greig
    Publisher: Routledge
The above information outlines module DT6123: "Playwright's Workshop I" and is valid from 2020 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional EN6118: Digital Literature, Arts, and Creative Practice


Semester 1 | Credits: 10

Postgraduate introduction to digital creative practice in literature and other arts. The course will explore the ways in which new technologies have been used in the creation of born-digital works of literature and other arts, and the wider cultural impact of these developments.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Describe how new media technologies have been used in the processes of literary and other creative practices.
  2. Articulate a comprehensive picture of the expanding field of born-digital creative work
  3. Analyse and critique a range of aesthetic practices associated with digital arts and literature.
  4. Describe the theoretical and methodological implications of digital creative practice.
  5. Employ a selection of digital tools and platforms as a form of creative and critical inquiry.
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Cybertext" by Espen J. Aarseth
    ISBN: 0801855799.
    Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press
  2. "Writing space" by Jay David Bolter
    ISBN: 0805829199.
    Publisher: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates
  3. "Prehistoric digital poetry" by C. T. Funkhouser
    ISBN: 0817354220.
    Publisher: University of Alabama Press
  4. "Digital Art and Meaning: Reading Kinetic Poetry, Text Machines, Mapping Art, and Interactive Installations" by Roberto Simanowski
    ISBN: 0816667381.
    Publisher: Univ Of Minnesota Press
The above information outlines module EN6118: "Digital Literature, Arts, and Creative Practice" and is valid from 2020 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional DT6131: Curation 1


Semester 1 | Credits: 10

This module involves a practical interaction with the universities collection of archives and art collection and an exploration of key case studies from around the world. There will be visits to key cultural venues.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Identify a range of roles and professional areas in the field of curation.
  2. Exhibit knowledge of the scope and interrelationship of major organisations in the field of curatorial arts practice in and outside of Ireland.
  3. Create and implement a plan for individual professional development in the fields of curation in the field of creative arts.
  4. Critically reflect on a site visit with an organization in the field of curatorial arts practice.
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Ways of Curating" by Hans-Ulrich Obrist,Asad Raz̤ā
    ISBN: 0241950961.
  2. "Cultures of the Curatorial" by Bismarck, Beatrice von, Jörn Schafaff and Thomas Weski (eds),
    ISBN: 978193410597.
    Publisher: Sternberg Press
The above information outlines module DT6131: "Curation 1" and is valid from 2019 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional DT6127: Producing 1


Semester 1 | Credits: 10

This module builds understanding of the role of the producer and the practical skills needed to fulfil that role. It covers such areas as understanding how to set up a company, engaging in strategic planning and development, financial planning, project management, while also focussing on key case studies from the Irish arts sector.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Engage with the role of the Creative Producer as creative, financial, administrative, technical and promotional lead of an artistic project or event.
  2. Understand the steps of successful Project management from concepts and contracts, to monitoring and evaluation
  3. Write a strategic plan for an organisation or collective, that is both costed and viable.
  4. Understand the steps of setting up an artistic company or collective through researching case studies and business models.
  5. Plan and cost a 'season' of artistic events.
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "So You Want to be a Theatre Producer?" by James Seabright
    ISBN: 9781854595379.
  2. "Introduction to Arts Management" by Bloomsbury
    ISBN: 978147423979.
    Publisher: Bloomsbury
The above information outlines module DT6127: "Producing 1" and is valid from 2020 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional DT6101: Irish Drama and Theatre from Beckett to the Present


Semester 1 and Semester 2 | Credits: 10

This course explores the history of Irish theatre from 1950 to the present, placing emphasis on the importance of Beckett for an understanding of Irish drama.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Identify key moments in Irish theatre history since 1950
  2. Describe and analyse the importance of social, cultural and economic factors in the development of Irish theatre history since 1950
  3. Produce a written research essay that deploys the skills of archival research, textual analysis, and performance analysis.
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Modern and Contemporary Irish Drama" by John Harrington
  2. "Contemporary Irish Plays." by Patrick Lonergan
The above information outlines module DT6101: "Irish Drama and Theatre from Beckett to the Present" and is valid from 2020 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional DT6109: Applied Theatre


Semester 1 and Semester 2 | Credits: 10

This course introduces students to core concepts and practices in the field of applied theatre techniques which includes but is not limited to educational theatre, Theatre for Social Change, community arts/theatre,Theatre of the Oppressed and other Boalian techniques, theatre for development, and prison theatre.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Identify key working methods and genres in the practice of applied theatre.
  2. Distinguish between different working methodologies and genres within the larger field of applied theatre.
  3. Analyse key debates over ethics and collaboration in this field of practice.
  4. Building on our practical classroom exercises, lead basic exercises from each major genre of applied theatre discussed in class.
  5. Interrogate the role of the faciliator in applied theatre work.
  6. Propose a framework for their own independent applied theatre project.
  7. Demonstrate knowledge of a more advanced repertoire of activities and techinques from one targeted area of specialisation in applied theatre.
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "The Applied Theatre Reader" by Sheila Preston and Tim Prentki
  2. "Theatre of Good Intentions: Challenges and Hopes for Theatre and Social Change" by Dani Snyder-Young
  3. "Games for Actors and Non-Actors" by Augusto Boal
  4. "Community Performance: An Introduction" by Petra Kuppers
  5. "Local Acts: Community-Based Performance in the United States" by Jan Cohen-Cruz
The above information outlines module DT6109: "Applied Theatre" and is valid from 2020 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional DT6108: Exploring Michael Chekhov Technique


Semester 1 and Semester 2 | Credits: 10

This is a course for actors and directors exploring Chekhov technique through practice, journal and essay. Following a thorough practical introduction to certain key concepts of Qualities, Psychological Gesture, Centres and Atmosphere, the student will move on to working on scenes and speeches. The experiential component will be backed up by discussion of various chapters of ‘To The Actor’ by Michael Chekhov, and analysis of the training DVDs of the Michael Chekhov Association.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate theoretical knowledge of the theory of Chekhov's work academically and its placement in the the history of actor training.
  2. Have some ability in the practise of the technique, in particular, but not exclusively, Qualities, Radiating and Receiving, Centres, General and Personal Atmosphere, Psychological Gesture and Composition.
  3. Select and apply at least two of Chekhov's concepts to a scene from a given play.
  4. Execute written self assessment response of the practical work.
  5. Practically apply the techniques to directing theatre.
  6. Assess the technique by comparing it to at least one other practical performance technique they know about or of which they have experience.
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (55%)
  • Department-based Assessment (45%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "To the Actor" by Michael Chekhov
  2. "On the Technique of Acting" by Michael Chekhov
  3. "Lessons for the Professional Actor" by Michael Chekhov
  4. "Three Sisters" by Anton Chekhov (trans. Michael Frayn)
The above information outlines module DT6108: "Exploring Michael Chekhov Technique" and is valid from 2020 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional DT6120: Ensemble Acting and Devising


Semester 1 and Semester 2 | Credits: 10

A practical and theoretical introduction to twentieth-century acting and performance techniques with special emphasis on Artaud, Grotowski, and Peter Brook.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Engage in practical ensemble-based activities for devising theatre practice.
  2. Describe and put into practice modern and contemporary theories of ensemble
  3. Describe and put into practice the ideas of key practitioners, such as Boal, Brook and Chekhov.
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "The Empty Space" by Peter Brook
  2. "Towards a Poor Theatre" by Jerzy Grotowski
The above information outlines module DT6120: "Ensemble Acting and Devising" and is valid from 2020 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional EN6136: Thinking about Books/Thinking about Theatre


Semester 1 | Credits: 10

This is a bipartite module. Students spend the first six weeks focusing on the medium of the book and the second six weeks focusing on the medium of theatre. Particular topics and areas of focus may vary from year to year.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Discourse knowledgeably about the medium of the book.
  2. Discourse knowledgeably about the medium of theatre.
  3. Conduct sophisticated oral and/or written analyses of primary texts.
  4. Critically engage with appropriate secondary sources.
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Reading List
  1. "MLA Handbook" by Modern Language Association of America
    ISBN: 9781603292627.
The above information outlines module EN6136: "Thinking about Books/Thinking about Theatre" and is valid from 2020 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional DT6121: Fieldwork And Theatre Business


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

This module is focussed on professionalisation strategies and processes in the field of drama and theatre at large. Topics including long-range professional career planning in a variety of theatre and performance disciplines, producing, project preparation, grant writing, tax law for artists and more will be covered through interactive workshops.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Identify a range of roles and professional areas in the field of theatre and performing arts.
  2. Exhibit knowledge of the scope and interrelationship of major organisations in the field of theatre and performing arts in Ireland.
  3. Create and implement a plan for individual professional development in the field of theatre and performing arts.
  4. Critically reflect on a work experience with an organisation in the field of theatre and performing arts.
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "So You Want To Be A Theatre Producer?" by James Seabright
    ISBN: 978185459537.
  2. "How To Start Your Own Theatre Company" by Reginald Nelson
    ISBN: 978155652813.
The above information outlines module DT6121: "Fieldwork And Theatre Business" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional DT6113: Applied Dramaturgy


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

This module introduces students to dramaturgy as a discipline with varied historical roots and as a practice that is diverse, sophisticated, and vital to contemporary theatre. It aims to equip students with the theoretical underpinnings and the intellectual tools with which to contribute confidently and effectively as dramaturgs in a rehearsal process (whether it be on a classic or modernist play, or in a devised production). Students complete the module by partnering with students mounting live performance projects for the module "Performance Lab."
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Investigate the range of roles and functions required of a dramaturge in both historical and contemporary contexts.
  2. Analyse the role and function of a dramaturge on a range of theatre and performance projects arising out of a variety of institutional contexts and aesthetic approaches.
  3. Articulate the difference between structural, production and institutional dramaturgy.
  4. Evaluate the practice of dramaturgy as applicable to other roles in the theatre including director, playwright, designer and actor among others.
  5. Execute a variety of dramaturgical roles and functions through class exercises, assignments and projects (including engagement with student projects from the module 'Performance Lab').
  6. Negotiate the risks and demands of collaborative work through the execution of dramaturgical work on assigned student peer performance projects.
  7. Critically assess your personal practice as a dramaturge in terms of historical and theoretical fluency, skills at collaborating with other artists and your use and manipulation of supporting resources in engaging with your assigned student peer performance project.
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "The Routledge Companion to Dramaturgy" by Magda Romanska, ed.
  2. "New dramaturgy" by edited by Katalin Trencsényi and Bernadette Cochrane.
    ISBN: 1408177080.
    Publisher: London; Bloomsbury
  3. "Dramaturgy and Performance" by Cathy Turner, Synne Behrndt
    ISBN: 1403996563.
    Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
  4. "Dramaturgy: A Revolution in Theatre" by Mary Luckhurst
    ISBN: 0521081882.
    Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  5. "Process of Dramaturgy" by Scott R. Irelan, Anne Fletcher, Julie Felise Dubiner
    ISBN: 1585103322.
    Publisher: Focus Publishing/R. Pullins Co.
The above information outlines module DT6113: "Applied Dramaturgy" and is valid from 2019 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional DT6122: Performance Lab


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

This course explores the relationship between theory and practice in a laboratory format that combines making and staging work with critical investigation. The purpose of this course is to provide students with a critical vocabulary for approaching practice as research that will result in the creation of new devised or staged work guided by student's shared intellectual and artistic interests. The first part of the semester will be focused on a survey of divergent approaches to the creative process in contemporary performance practice by way of artist accounts, film viewings and performance outings, and engagement with critical theory focused in theatre and performance studies. In the second half of the semester, students will work in groups with instructor supervision to create or stage a collective work that engages a research problem or question resulting in public performance of these works. Students will also complete a final research paper locating their performance project and its desired interventions in genealogies of theatre and performance practice. Assessment: Weekly written assignments, practical classroom exercises, group performance project and final research paper.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Compare and contrast varying methods of contemporary theatre making
  2. Experiment actively with contemporary physical theatre and devising techniques in a collaborative workshop format
  3. Create an original performance or stage an original interpretation of a piece for performance
  4. Demonstrate advanced skills of group collaboration
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Frantic Assembly Book of Devising Theatre" by Frantic Assembly
    ISBN: 978-113877701.
  2. "A Director Prepares" by Anne Bogart
    ISBN: 978-041523832.
  3. "Postdramatic theatre" by Hans-Thies Lehmann; translated and with an introduction by Karen J?urs-Munby
    ISBN: 0415268133.
    Publisher: London ; Routledge, 2006.
The above information outlines module DT6122: "Performance Lab" and is valid from 2019 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional DT6133: Playwrights' Workshop II: Special Topics


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

This workshop based module explores special topics in playwriting strategies and dramaturgical approaches which may include but are not limited to adaptation, documentary/verbatim theatre, and dramatic writing for the radio. By working through the challenges of different genres and writing processes, playwrights will stretch their skills in a collaborative group format. Students should be prepared to read work aloud in class and will learn to critique each other’s work.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Chart and adapt dramaturgical structures across a range of different styles of theatre
  2. Complete a short play( 20 minutes in duration) and a longer play (at least 40 minutes in duration).
  3. Critically reflect on their playwriting practice
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "The Secret Life of Plays" by Steve Waters
  2. "How do Plays Work" by David Edgar
  3. "The Writers Journey" by Christopher Volger
The above information outlines module DT6133: "Playwrights' Workshop II: Special Topics" and is valid from 2020 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Why Choose This Course?

Career Opportunities

Recent graduates have gone on to work with many theatre companies including the Abbey Theatre, the Gate Theatre, Rough Magic, the Young Vic (London) and others. They have also found employment in education, the heritage and tourist industries, arts organisations, business and the public service. Many have progressed to PhD study, often winning scholarships in support of their studies.

Who’s Suited to This Course

Learning Outcomes

 

Work Placement

Between May and mid-July, students do an internship of approximately three weeks with a professional theatre company or arts institution in Ireland or abroad. NUI Galway's partnerships with theatre companies are an important part of the course.

Study Abroad

Related Student Organisations

Course Fees

Fees: EU

€6,800 p.a. FT; €3,455 p.a. PT 2021/22

Fees: Tuition

€6,576 p.a. FT; €3,287 p.a. PT 2021/22

Fees: Student levy

€224 p.a. FT; €168 p.a. PT 2021/22

Fees: Non EU

€16,300 p.a. 2021/22

Postgraduate students in receipt of a SUSI grant—please note an F4 grant is where SUSI will pay €2,000 towards your tuition.  You will be liable for the remainder of the total fee.  An F5 grant is where SUSI will pay TUITION up to a maximum of €6,270.  SUSI will not cover the student levy of €224.
Postgraduate fee breakdown = tuition (EU or NON EU) + student levy as outlined above.

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Downloads

  • Postgraduate Taught Prospectus 2021

    Postgraduate Taught Prospectus 2021 PDF (11.3MB)

  • MA Drama and Theatre Studies Brochure

    MA Drama and Theatre Studies Brochure PDF (3.29 MB)