Course Overview

The Master of Engineering (ME) at NUI Galway is part of an integrated (Bachelors + Masters) 4+1 programme of study, meeting the European Framework Standards for engineering accreditation. Successfully completing this (level 9) ME course, as part of an accredited 4+1 structure, will allow you to achieve the educational requirements for Chartered Engineer (CEng) status upon graduation.

The ME programme on its own is a 60 ECTS one academic year course of study. Graduates with an honours degree in a cognate Engineering discipline may be eligible to take the ME. This will be of interest to graduates who wish to study more advanced topics in their core engineering discipline. Applicants wishing to use the ME programme as part of their CEng certification should be aware that professional accreditation is assessed by the Engineering Councils on the basis of the aggregate periods of study (Level 8 + Level 9), and not on the Masters year alone. Candidates need to satisfy themselves that their undergraduate (Level 8) degree meets the relevant standards.

This new programme, based at NUI Galway’s new Engineering Building, is for graduates of Level 8 BE degrees who want to develop their engineering knowledge for a career in industry or research based on energy systems applications. It is designed to meet the education standard for Chartered Engineer (C.Eng.) with Engineers Ireland. It builds on the successful BE in Energy Systems Engineering, providing graduates with an opportunity to specialise further or to broaden their knowledge in engineering disciplines.

This programme is offered in the €40 million Engineering Building, a14,200 square-metre modern, energy-efficient facility, and the largest School of Engineering in the country.

The building is a “living laboratory”, which will provide high-tech working examples for engineering students to study.

Scholarships available
Find out about our Postgraduate Scholarships here.

Applications and Selections

Applications are made online via the NUI Galway Postgraduate Applications System

Who Teaches this Course

  • Professor Gerard Hurley, Electrical & Electronic Engineering
  • Dr John Eaton, Mechanical Engineering
  • Dr Thomas Van Rensburg, Economics
researcher
Prof. Sean Leen
B.Eng.,M.Eng.Sc.,Ph.D.,PGCAP
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researcher
Prof Peter McHugh
B.E., Sc.M.,PH.D.
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researcher
Dr Rory Monaghan
B.E., Ph.D., S.M.
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researcher
Dr Stephen Nash
B.A., B.A.I., M.Sc., Ph.D.
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researcher
Dr. Nathan Quinlan
B.E., M.Eng.Sc., D.Phil.
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Requirements and Assessment

Key Facts

Entry Requirements

Second Class Honours in a Level 8 (bachelor’s or equivalent) engineering degree in a related discipline from a recognised university or third-level college, with substantial elements of energy, mechanical, electrical and/or civil engineering.


Additional Requirements

Duration

9 months, full-time

Next start date

September 2021

A Level Grades ()

Average intake

15 (approximately)

Closing Date

Please refer to the review/closing date website.

NFQ level

9

Mode of study

Taught

ECTS weighting

60

Award

CAO

Course code

1MEES1

Course Outline

This programme provides training in three areas: advanced technologies in energy systems engineering, transferable skills for employment and/or a research career in the energy sector, and technology development through an energy systems engineering project.

Curriculum Information

Curriculum information relates to the current academic year (in most cases).
Course and module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Glossary of Terms

Credits
You must earn a defined number of credits (aka ECTS) to complete each year of your course. You do this by taking all of its required modules as well as the correct number of optional modules to obtain that year's total number of credits.
Module
An examinable portion of a subject or course, for which you attend lectures and/or tutorials and carry out assignments. E.g. Algebra and Calculus could be modules within the subject Mathematics. Each module has a unique module code eg. MA140.
Optional
A module you may choose to study.
Required
A module that you must study if you choose this course (or subject).
Semester
Most courses have 2 semesters (aka terms) per year.

Year 1 (60 Credits)

Required EOS6101: Global Change


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

Learning Outcomes
  1. Critically discuss the basic science behind the natural processes that impact global climate
  2. Recognize and interprete geological and chemical indicators of present and past global change in the environment (atmosphere, water, sediment/mineral).
  3. Evaluate and appraise how human activities can be drivers of global change
  4. Explain the role of the IPCC and how it works
  5. Develop knowledge of current climate change adaptation strategies
  6. Compile scientific information from multiple sources and prepare a briefing document for a general audience.
  7. Present scientific perspectives on global change to both a specific scientific audience and to the general public
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Written Assessment (70%)
  • Continuous Assessment (30%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module EOS6101: "Global Change" and is valid from 2015 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required EC5102: Renewable Energy Economics and Policy


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

A key focus of the module is the optimal provision of renewable energy resources and on problems that arise due to the incomplete nature of markets for these resources. The course will address the theory of externalities, missing markets and property rights; the theory of public goods and Nash-Cournot equilibria. Attention is given to energy externalities, public goods, Pigovian taxes in the energy sector, emission standards, tradable permits and tradable energy certificates.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. The module is designed to equip students with strong quantitative applied modelling skills to critically analyse energy economics and policy that are fundamentally linked to the research activities of faculty and research staff. The programme has four objectives: • To provde a theoretical framework for the evaluation of energy economics and renewable energy economics
  2. To provide students with the necessary analytical skills to undertake a rigorous evaluation of renewable energy economic projects and programmes.
  3. To provide students with the interdisciplinary skills necessary to develop renewable energy-economic models and apply these to real life environmental problems.
  4. To provide students with generic modelling and policy analysis skills.
  5. To provide students with the skills to estimate non-market values associated with renewable energy projects
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Written Assessment (50%)
  • Continuous Assessment (50%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Energy Economics" by Bhattacharyya, S.C.
    Publisher: Springer-Verlag, London
  2. "Natural resource and environmental economics" by Perman, R., M.A. Y., McFilvary, J. and Common, M.
    Publisher: Pearson Education
  3. "Environmental economics: in theory and practice" by Hanley, N., Shogren, J.F. and White, B. 2007
    Publisher: Palgrave-Macmillan,
  4. "The theory of externalities, public goods and club goods" by Cornes, R. and Sandler, T.
    Publisher: CUP. New York
  5. "Resource economics" by Conrad, J.M.
    Publisher: CUP, New York
The above information outlines module EC5102: "Renewable Energy Economics and Policy" and is valid from 2015 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required EG6101: Energy Systems Engineering Project


Semester 2 | Credits: 20


(Language of instruction: English)

Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module EG6101: "Energy Systems Engineering Project" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional CT561: Systems Modelling and Simulation


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

Simulation is a quantitative method used to support decision making and predicting system behaviour over time. This course focuses the system dynamics approach. The course covers the fundamentals of simulation, and describes how to design and build mathematical models. Case studies used include: software project management, public health policy planning, and capacity planning.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Define the aim of Simulation and its role in the decision making process for complex systems
  2. Distinguish between the two feedback types: positive and negative
  3. Demonstrate how to apply the system dynamics approach to areas including public health, software engineering management and capacity planning.
  4. Explain and apply numerical integration methods to solve simulation problems.
  5. Given a simulation problem, formulate a model, test the structure and equations, and perform detailed sensitivity analysis on the impact of a range of policy options
  6. Build, test and evaluate models using Vensim and R.
  7. Appreciate the diiferences between continuous, discrete event and agent-based simulation
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Written Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module CT561: "Systems Modelling and Simulation" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional ME521: Research Methods for Engineers


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

The aim of this module is to equip graduates in engineering with appropriate skills to conduct autonomous research. It is essential for the effective generation, collection analysis and interpretation of scientific knowledge.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand the process, methods and tools of conducting scientific research
  2. Define the research problem and formulate alternative research ideas and research questions
  3. Use database systems for literature searches
  4. Use EndNote for academic referencing
  5. Be capable of structuring and synthesising the literature
  6. Develop a conceptual model
  7. Develop effective oral and written skills
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module ME521: "Research Methods for Engineers" and is valid from 2019 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional ME432: Technology Innovation & Entrepreneurship


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

The module covers a broad range of topics that critically affect the successful identification and commercialisation of technologies. It is designed to help students develop strong conceptual foundations for understanding and exploiting technological innovation and entrepreneurship. More specifically, it aims to equip students with an understanding of the technology innovation life cycle and the key issues involved in entrepreneurship and new venture creation. It introduces concepts and frameworks to create, commercialise and capture value from technology-based products and services. It will provide students with a comprehensive toolbox to enable them to identify opportunities, develop feasibility studies and business plans in order to develop and manage innovation throughout the product lifecycle and exploit a new technological venture.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand the critical influencing factors for successful technology development and execution
  2. Be capable of using appropriate methods and tools to develop and exploit a technology
  3. Gain a solid grounding in transferable skills such as creative thinking, problem specification, team working, and the ability to synthesise and apply acquired knowledge to solve real world problems
  4. Demonstrate effective oral and written skills
  5. Assess the consequences of different courses of action
  6. Take practical decisions and evaluate the results
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "product Design & Development" by Ulrich, K.T. and Eppinger, S. D.
    Publisher: McGraw Hill
  2. "Biodesign: The Process of Innovating Medical Technologies" by Zenios, S. Makower, J. Yock, P.
    Publisher: Cambridge University press
The above information outlines module ME432: "Technology Innovation & Entrepreneurship" and is valid from 2019 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional AY872: Financial Management I


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

The objective of this course is to develop the participants' understanding of the theory and practice of financial management, and to develop their skills in the application of this knowledge to financial decision-making. It is designed for students who have not previously studied finance. The course will provide a good basic foundation in Financial Management for students not intending to specialise in finance. The course provides a broad understanding of the objectives and methods of financial management, from which students can progress to a more advanced study of corporate finance.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand and explain the shareholder value maximisation objective of financial management activities.
  2. Understand the concept of time value of money, and apply valuation techniques in the valuation of financial securities.
  3. Describe the various techniques for the appraisal of capital investment projects, and their advantages and limitations.
  4. Analyse capital investment proposals and make recommendations.
  5. Demonstrate an understanding of working capital and of working capital management issues.
  6. Explain and apply relevant approaches to the management of current assets (inventory, debtors, and liquidity) and liabilities.
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Written Assessment (80%)
  • Continuous Assessment (20%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module AY872: "Financial Management I" and is valid from 2020 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional CE6102: Design of Sustainable Environmental System I


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Written Assessment (50%)
  • Continuous Assessment (50%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module CE6102: "Design of Sustainable Environmental System I" and is valid from 2014 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional EG5101: Advanced Energy Systems Engineering


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

This module will introduce the fundamental & applied engineering principles behind current and future energy technologies including combustion, gasification and electrochemistry, as well as economic analysis methods. These fundamentals will be combined with previously-acquired techniques to analyse complex energy systems such as conversion technologies (wind, solar, geothermal, waste-to-energy, CCS) and infrastructures (bioenergy, natural gas, hydrogen, water). Whole energy system analysis is undertaken using the Ireland 2050 modelling tool.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Calculate levelised cost of electricity for a range of power generation technologies under different economic conditions and environmental constraints.
  2. Perform stoichiometric calculations to find combustion product composition & fuel emissions factors.
  3. Calculate thermodynamic efficiencies of a range of fossil and renewable energy conversion technologies.
  4. Be cognisant of the advantages and disadvantages of a wide range of energy conversion technologies.
  5. Design energy systems that seek to balance the three pillars of energy policy (decarbonisation, energy security, cost competitiveness).
  6. Be capable of conducting a self-directed literature review on a scientific or engineering topic in the energy field and critique it objectively.
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module EG5101: "Advanced Energy Systems Engineering" and is valid from 2019 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional CE5100: Sustainable Energy


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

This module provides an overview of sustainable energy resources and the technologies used to harness them.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Discuss the history of energy consumption through the ages and describe the environmental impacts of traditional fossil fuel and nuclear energy consumption
  2. Justify the use of sustainable energy resources to satisfy our energy requirements and recognize the role of the engineer in the development, application and promotion of sustainable energy
  3. Describe the various types of sustainable energy resources (solar, wind, hydro, tidal, wave) and assess the available resource
  4. Outline and discuss the main technologies used to convert sustainable energy resources to electricity, derive equations for power output from these devices and apply these equations to simplified systems
  5. Describe the environmental impacts associated with exploiting the various sustainable resources.
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Written Assessment (80%)
  • Continuous Assessment (20%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module CE5100: "Sustainable Energy" and is valid from 2020 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional LW361: Planning And Law I


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

This course provides engineering students a basic knowledge of the Irish legal system, the legal regime regulating planning and development and the environment in Irish Law and some legal topics in an engineering context. The course looks at: the Irish legal system, the institutions of planning control; the application for planning permission; participation by objectors; the appeal process and judicial review of planning decisions; and compensation for refusal of development; the common law relating to the environment; environmental legislation including the Environmental Protection Agency Act 1992 as amended; and contract law relating to engineering projects. At the end of the module, engineering students will have knowledge of the central principles of Irish law, in particular those areas that they are likely to encounter while working as engineers. A key element of the course is an interactive group project with Law and Environmental Science students working together on practical application of a planning case study including taking part in a mock oral hearing. This will include drafting submissions related to the case study and presenting those submissions to the oral hearing.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Be familiar with the Irish legal system and sources of law
  2. familiar with the Irish planning code
  3. familiar with the institutional framework of planning law
  4. Critically discuss the planning process
  5. Capable of researching planning & environmental law issues
  6. Familiar with key elements of contract law
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Berna Grist, An Introduction to Irish Planning Law, 2nd Ed., (Dublin, Irish Planning Institute, 2013)" by n/a
The above information outlines module LW361: "Planning And Law I" and is valid from 2019 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional BME501: Advanced Finite Element Methods


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

The module will educate students in the use of linear and non-linear finite element methods that are most relevant to problems and systems encountered in both fundamental and applied research in biomedical and mechanical engineering.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Explain the structure of a linear finite element boundary value problem solution algorithm and its implementation in a computer programme.
  2. Explain the structure of non-linear finite element solution algorithms and their programming implementations, distinguishing between implicit and explicit methods.
  3. Distinguish between direct and element-by-element solution methods.
  4. Implement linear and non-linear constitutive laws in implicit and explicit finite element software.
  5. Deal with the formulation and solution of multi-physics problems.
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Written Assessment (50%)
  • Continuous Assessment (50%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module BME501: "Advanced Finite Element Methods" and is valid from 2018 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional ME5171: Combustion Science and Engineering


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

The module introduces students to the fundamentals and applications of combustion. Students are expected to have a background in either chemical or engineering thermodynamics. The module covers: reaction stoichiometry, combustion thermodynamics, reaction kinetics and dynamics, transport phenomena, liquid and solid combustion, pollutant formation, and computational methods. Analytical and numerical problem-solving techniques are developed through homework assignments, projects and computer labs.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Perform calculations of combustion stoichiometry
  2. Use the 1st law of thermodynamics to calculate fuel heating value
  3. Use the 2nd law of thermodynamics to calculate equilibrium compositions and flame temperatures for combustion
  4. Calculate the chemical kinetic rates of combustion reactions
  5. Use detailed chemical mechanisms to predict combustion characteristics of fuels under realistic conditions
  6. Solve mixed diffusion-kinetic controlled combustion problems
  7. Understand the interaction between fluid dynamics and chemical reactions
  8. Evaluate efficiency and environmental performance of energy conversion technologies
  9. Be capable of using computer packages to solve combustion problems
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Written Assessment (60%)
  • Continuous Assessment (40%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "An Introduction to Combustion: Concepts and Applications" by Stephen Turns
    ISBN: 978007338019.
The above information outlines module ME5171: "Combustion Science and Engineering" and is valid from 2018 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional CE6103: Design of Sustainable Environmental Systems II


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

This module expands on the material covered in Design of Sustainable Environmental Systems I (delivered in Semester I)
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Design advanced water, wastewater and sludge treatment systems (e.g. nutrient recovery, annamox, disinfection)
  2. Formulate strategies for sludge treatment/production of biosolids and the subsequent re-use of biosolids and sewage sludge in agriculture and energy production
  3. Analyse their relationship between energy and water/wastewater and develop strategies to maximise energy efficiency in the water/wastewater sectors
  4. Understand regulation that applies to the environmental engineering sector (e.g. discharge limits, effluent categories, nutrient regulations)
  5. Quantify the effects of erosion on the environment and implement strategies to limit its effects
  6. Design systems for recovery of nitrogen and phosphorous from wastewaters
  7. Implement strategies for provision of improved water and wastewater facilities in developing countries
  8. Develop strategies and design methods of remediating water sources (e.g. groundwater, aquifers, surface waters)
  9. Implement soil remediation strategies
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Written Assessment (50%)
  • Continuous Assessment (50%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Wastewater engineering" by Metcalf & Eddy, Inc
    ISBN: 0070418780.
    Publisher: Boston ; McGraw-Hill, c2003.
  2. "Wastewater Treatment" by Henze
    ISBN: 2540627022.
    Publisher: Springer
The above information outlines module CE6103: "Design of Sustainable Environmental Systems II" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional ME426: Turbomachines and Advanced Fluid Dynamics


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

Fluid dynamics of turbomachines Introduction: background, scope and significance of rotodynamic fluid machinery. Configurations and classifications of turbomachine. Flow systems and system matching. Governing equations; Euler work equation. Performance characteristics, efficiencies. Dimensional analysis. Selection of turbomachine configuration. Two-dimensional cascades. Mean-line analysis and design of compressors and turbine. Axial and radial flow types: pumps, fans, turbines, turbochargers. Mixed flow turbomachines: Francis turbines Overview of open flow turbomachines: turbines, propellers. Related topics in Fluid Dynamics Turbulent flows – classification and characteristics. Turbulence models. Introduction to computational fluid dynamics. Application of CFD to turbomachines.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Define and classify turbomachines.
  2. Calculate and apply head, flow and power coefficients for performance assesssment.
  3. Select turbomachines appropriate to particular applications and duties.
  4. Describe and explain the flow phenomena in turbomachine components.
  5. Perform design, on a preliminary basis, of blading for axial and radial flow pumps and turbines.
  6. Conduct numerical computations of turbomachine flow and performance.
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Written Assessment (70%)
  • Continuous Assessment (30%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module ME426: "Turbomachines and Advanced Fluid Dynamics" and is valid from 2019 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional CT549: SmartGrid


Semester 2 | Credits: 5


(Language of instruction: English)

Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Written Assessment (60%)
  • Continuous Assessment (40%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module CT549: "SmartGrid" and is valid from 2020 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional EE6102: Power Systems


Semester 1 | Credits: 5


(Language of instruction: English)

Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Written Assessment (50%)
  • Continuous Assessment (50%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module EE6102: "Power Systems" and is valid from 2020 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Why Choose This Course?

Career Opportunities

There are job opportunities in design and testing, consultancy, project management, energy systems management, product development and facilities engineering. The need for graduates with skills in energy systems technologies is growing, including in building energy management, renewable energy systems, electrical power systems, smart grid and energy consultancy. Other potential roles are in the areas of energy economics, energy policy, energy regulation, energy planning and the law.

Who’s Suited to This Course

Learning Outcomes

 

Work Placement

Study Abroad

Related Student Organisations

Course Fees

Fees: EU

€5,450 p.a. 2020/21

Fees: Tuition

€5,226 p.a. 2020/21

Fees: Student levy

€224 p.a. 2020/21

Fees: Non EU

€20,750 p.a. 2020/21

Postgraduate students in receipt of a SUSI grant—please note an F4 grant is where SUSI will pay €2,000 towards your tuition. You will be liable for the remainder of the total fee. An F5 grant is where SUSI will pay TUITION up to a maximum of €6,270.  SUSI will not cover the student levy of €224.

Find out More

Ms Sharon Gilmartin
Administration
T: +353 91 492 664
E: energyeng@nuigalway.ie

Downloads

  • Postgraduate Taught Prospectus 2021

    Postgraduate Taught Prospectus 2021 PDF (11.3MB)