Course Overview

The MA in Film Production & Direction is a rigorous course that offers training in Directing, Producing, Camera, Sound, Lighting, and Editing. From the moment the programme begins, students are involved in collaborative filmmaking tasks which offer real-world training in a range of roles across the film production process. The practice-based modules are complemented by modules in screen writing and film theory and analysis to enrich and inform the creative process and to deepen critical reflection. Through a series of carefully designed short film projects, students practice and develop a range of creative skills. The demanding schedule insists students refine their facility for effective communication, organisation and collaboration. This course is for those who are committed and passionate about making films.

Applications and Selections

Applications are made online via The Postgraduate Applications Centre (PAC). Relevant PAC application code(s) above. 

To see, in advance, what supporting documents are required to supplement your online application please visit: www.nuigalway.ie/postgrad/pac_supp_docs_taught_arts.html

 

 

Who Teaches this Course


 

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Requirements and Assessment

Students on the programme are assessed on their creative practice and their understanding of film form by leading industry practitioners as well as film scholars. Assessments are designed to develop students’ creative and technical skills, as well as their ability to work collaboratively and to critically assess their own work and that of their peers. Production journals, blogs, essays and presentations form some of the diverse range of assessment tasks students will be asked to undertake over the course of the MA programme.

 

 

Key Facts

Entry Requirements

NQAI Level 8 degree or equivalent, H2.2. GPA 3.0 or equivalent international qualification. IELTS score of 6.5 or equivalent if applicable. Students who do not meet the honours degree requirement but have a Level 7 degree (Merit 1) may be admitted to the PDip course with the possibility of progressing to the MA if they receive a minimum of 60% in their course work during the year. Applicants are required to submit a sample of film-making (accompanied with a description of your role in the production), one idea (script or storyboard) for a short film, one short critique (200–400 words) of a recent film or television programme and a personal statement. 

Additional supporting documentation is required. For more details click here.



Additional Requirements

Duration

1 year, full-time

Next start date

September 2018

A Level Grades ()

Average intake

15

Closing Date

You are advised to apply early, which may result in an early offer; see the offer round dates

Next start date

September 2018

NFQ level

Mode of study

Taught

ECTS weighting

MA—90, PG Dip—60

Award

CAO

PAC code

GYA63

Course Outline

The course is a full-time, 12-month programme, which runs from September to August of each year. Across a range of practice-based modules and practioner-led workshops, students will be given comprehensive training in Camera, Editing, Production, Direction and Sound. All students participate in core modules in screenwriting, film theory and practice and film making, and also have the opportunity to take modules in digital film and film administration. Students work on practical filmmaking projects across the year concluding in a final project where students pitch, develop and produce their end-of-year film projects over the final months of the programme.

Core Modules

  • Screenwriting Fundamentals
  • Production Project 1 & 2
  • Directing Film 
  • Film Theory and Practice

Optional modules may include:

  • Screenplay Development
  • Digital Film and Culture
  • Film Exhibition, Administration and Curation
  • Film History 2

Modules for 2016-17

Curriculum information relates to the current academic year (in most cases).
Course and module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Glossary of Terms

Credits
You must earn a defined number of credits (aka ECTS) to complete each year of your course. You do this by taking all of its required modules as well as the correct number of optional modules to obtain that year's total number of credits.
Optional
A module you may choose to study.
Required
A module that you must study if you choose this course (or subject).
Semester
Most courses have 2 semesters (aka terms) per year.

Year 1 (90 Credits)

Required FM6108: Short Film Making


Semester 1 | Credits: 10

This module will examine the structure, operation and circulation of the Short Film, exploring a range of ideas about short film making, with special attention to the practical choices involved.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Compare and contrast disparate films and the implications of specific forms in the short film.
  2. Demonstrate a specific and comparative ability to observe and discuss various forms of short film.
  3. Work in flexible, creative and independent ways, showing self-direction, self-discipline and reflexivity.
  4. Demonstrate skills in written, oral and visual communications.
  5. Achieve the skills to write and make a short film.
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "In short" by Eileen Elsey and Andrew Kelly
    ISBN: 9780851708935.
    Publisher: BFI Pub.
  2. "On the composition of the short fiction scenario" by Sergei M. Eisenstein; translated by Alan. Y. Upchurch; with an introduction by Jay Leyda
    ISBN: 9780861320745.
    Publisher: Seagull Books
  3. "La Jetée (London: Afterall Books, 2009)." by Harbord, Janet
    ISBN: 978-184638048.
  4. "The art of the short fiction film" by Richard Raskin
    ISBN: 9780786411832.
    Publisher: McFarland
The above information outlines module FM6108: "Short Film Making" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required FM6107: Film Practice


Semester 1 | Credits: 10

These modules explore the practice of visual storytelling with an emphasis on collaboration and creative risk-taking. Students will learn the art and craft of producing and directing short fiction and documentary through exercises, homework, discussion, and demonstration.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate the creative ability to devise, develop and produce a short fiction or documentary film.
  2. Demonstate an understanding of the roles and tasks of the fllm director and producer.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to effectively communicate with actors and crew.
  4. Demonstrate proficiency in film production management (prepping, scheduling, budgeting) for fiction and documentary.
  5. Demonstrate proficiency in post-production skills.
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "The Visual Story: Creating the Visual Structure..." by Block, Bruce
    ISBN: 978-0-240-807.
    Publisher: Focal Press
  2. "The Guerilla Film Makers Handbook UK" by Jones, Chris & Jolliffe, Genevieve
    ISBN: 978-0-826-479.
    Publisher: Continuum
  3. "Film Directing Fundamentals: See Your Film Before Shooting" by Proferes, Nicholas T.
    ISBN: 978-0-240-809.
    Publisher: Focal Press
  4. "Directing the Documentary" by Rabiger, Michael
    ISBN: 978-0-240-810.
    Publisher: Focal Press
  5. "Directing: Film Techniques and Aesthetics" by Rabiger, Michael
    ISBN: 978-0-240-808.
    Publisher: Focal Press
  6. "Writing, Drecting & Producing Documentary Films & Videos" by Rosenthal, Alan
    ISBN: 978-0-809-327.
    Publisher: Southern Illinois Univ Press
  7. "Production Management for TV and Film: The Professional's..." by Stradling, Linda
    ISBN: 978-1-408-121.
    Publisher: Methuen Drama
  8. "Film Director's Intuition: Script Analysis & Rehearsal..." by Weston, Judith
    ISBN: 978-0-941-188.
    Publisher: Michael Wiese Productions
The above information outlines module FM6107: "Film Practice " and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required FA504: Practical Workshops 1


Semester 1 | Credits: 0

Assessments
  • Department-based Assessment (100%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module FA504: "Practical Workshops 1" and is valid from 2014 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required FA501: Imaginative Responses 1


Semester 1 | Credits: 10

Assessments
  • Department-based Assessment (100%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module FA501: "Imaginative Responses 1" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required FA508: Production Projects 1


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

Students build upon the skills gained in all modules from Semester 1 to develop and produce short films (3 -5 mins). Weekly workshops support this development and mentors support the production process.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. devise, research, develop and produce a short film
  2. demonstrate the ability to work both independently and collaboratively
  3. manage the administrative tasks (prepping, scheduling and budgeting) required to produce a short film
Assessments
  • Department-based Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Directing the Documentary" by Michael Rabiger
    Publisher: Focal Press
  2. "Documentary Storytelling: Creative Nonfiction" by Bernard, Sheils Curran
    Publisher: Focal Press
  3. "Producing with Passion" by Fadiman, Dorothy & Levelle
    Publisher: Michael Weise Productions
  4. "Writing, Directing & Producing Documentary Films & Videos" by Alan Rosenthal
    Publisher: So UnivPress
The above information outlines module FA508: "Production Projects 1" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required FA510: Production Projects 2


Semester 2 | Credits: 30

Students are to build upon the skills gained in all modules and projects to date to devise, develop and produce two final short films (5-10 min), either documentary or fiction.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate proficiency in devising, researching, pitching, developing and producing a short film project.
  2. Demonstrate proficiency in working independently, creatively and collaboratively.
  3. Manage the administrative tasks (proposal, treatment, correspondence, scheduling and budgeting, etc.) required to produce a short film project.
  4. Produce a creative, technically proficient short film.
Assessments
  • Department-based Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Film, A Sound Art" by Chion, Michel
    Publisher: Columbia Univ Press
  2. "Changing Direction: A Practical Approach to Directing Actors..." by DeKoven, Lenore
    Publisher: Focal Press
  3. "Producing with Passion: Making Films that Change the World" by Fadiman, Dorothy & Levelle, Tony
    Publisher: Michael Wiese Prod
  4. "The Guerilla Film Makers Handbook" by Jones, Chris & Jolliffe, Genevieve
    Publisher: Continuum 2000
  5. "Cutting Rhythms: Shaping the Film Edit" by Pearlman, Karen
    Publisher: Focal Press
  6. "Masters of Light: Conversations with Contemp Cinematographers" by Schaefer, Dennis & Salvato, Larry
    Publisher: Univ of California Press
The above information outlines module FA510: "Production Projects 2" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required FA507: Practical Workshops 2


Semester 2 | Credits: 0

Assessments
  • Department-based Assessment (100%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module FA507: "Practical Workshops 2" and is valid from 2014 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required FA511: Imaginative Responses 2


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

Assessments
  • Department-based Assessment (100%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module FA511: "Imaginative Responses 2" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional FM6105: Digital Film and Culture


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

This course provides a critical understanding of the relationship between film and digital technology, assessing the impact of digital filmmaking on film production and film theory. Through task-based learning, students will be asked to consider the impact of digital media on our relationship to visual culture. The course will consider what the place of film (and cinema) is in the digital age and the impact which digital technology has on our relationship to visual media.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate a specific and comparative knowledge of various theoretical approaches to film and digital visual culture.
  2. Demonstrate an enhanced awareness of film aesthetics and film cultures within the context of digital technology.
  3. Engage critically with film-makers and theorists in debates about the nature of film and film studies in light of developments within digital technology.
  4. Produce and critically reflect upon short audio-visual projects.
  5. Work in flexible, creative and independent ways, showing self-direction, self-discipline and reflexivity.
  6. Demonstrate skills in written, oral and visual communications.
Assessments
  • Department-based Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "The Language of New Media" by Lev Manovich
    Publisher: MIT Press
  2. "Film Theory and Criticism" by Leo Baudry and & Marshall Cohen’s (eds.)
    Publisher: Oxford University Press
  3. "Puzzle Films: Complex Storytelling in Contemporary Cinema" by Warren Buckland
    Publisher: Blackwell
  4. "The Cinema Effect" by Sean Cubitt
    Publisher: MIT Press
  5. ", Remediation: Understanding New Media" by Jay Bolter and Richard Grusin
    Publisher: MIT Press
  6. "Convergence Culture: Where Old and New Media Collide" by Henry Jenkins
    Publisher: NYU Press
The above information outlines module FM6105: "Digital Film and Culture" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional FM6109: Writing for The Small Screen


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

This course provides a critical understanding of the relationship between evolving technology and screen narrative. Through task-based learning students will consider the evolution of long-running narrative through the age of television and new and emerging media.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate critical awareness of classic and emerging screen narrative forms.
  2. Develop individual craft as screen narrative practitioners.
  3. Understand and embrace possibilities of new platforms for screen narrative.
  4. Work in flexible, creative and independent ways, showing self-direction, self-discipline and reflexivity.
  5. Demonstrate skills in written, oral and visual communications.
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (20%)
  • Oral, Audio Visual or Practical Assessment (80%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "The matter of images" by Richard Dyer
    ISBN: 9780415254953.
    Publisher: Routledge
The above information outlines module FM6109: "Writing for The Small Screen" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional FM6100: Film exhibition, administration and education


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

This innovative module provides student with an introduction to important cultural areas increasingly relevant to film studies, film administration, education and curation. Structured around sessions with practitioners from each of these areas, this module provides students with crucial insights into the distinctive requirements and possibilities in each of these spheres and prepares them for potential employment opportunities in these areas.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. demonstrate an understanding of historical contexts in the distribution and exhibition of film
  2. Understand practical and theoretical issues surrounding the distribution and exhibition of digital cinema
  3. Undertake independent research into current case studies in the marketing, distribution and exhibition of film (incl festivals)
  4. Demonstrate an understanding of practices around film programming in a range of cinematic and festival contexts
  5. Develop an awareness and understanding of the work of developing young audiences and filmmakers
  6. Gain experience in the programming of a film programme
  7. Gain an understanding of the work and theoretical issues within film preservation and archiving
Assessments
  • Department-based Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "The death of cinema: History, cultural memory and the digital dark age" by Paolo Cherchi Usai
    Publisher: BFI
  2. "Film Festivals: Culture, People, and Power on the Global Screen" by Cindy Hing-Yuk Wong
    Publisher: Rutgers University Press
The above information outlines module FM6100: "Film exhibition, administration and education" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Why Choose This Course?

Career Opportunities

Why Choose This Course?

This programme is designed to give students a thorough practical and critical understanding of film making. The number of film projects undertaken over the year ensure that students have the opportunity to practice and develop a range of creative skills. This is an intensive course designed to engage and encourage emerging voices in film, and students are both urged and expected to take risks in their creative practice. Graduates of the MA in Film Production & Direction will be ready to begin film and television careers as creative professionals, having developed core technical and creative skills informed by a critical awareness of film history and analysis. Furthermore, as a student at the Huston School you will be part of a collaborative creative community, meeting with students across a range of MA programmes to develop your understanding of the history and craft of filmmaking. You will also have all the opportunities which come from studying at one of the world’s top Universities, including access to a range of seminars and high-profile guest speakers, who have in the past included Gabriel Byrne, Laura Mulvey, Lenny Abrahamson, Roddy Doyle, Donald Clarke and Stephen Frears.

Career Opportunities 

Graduates have gone on to success in various areas of the film and television industry, finding employment in production companies, television studios, post-production facilities and as freelance crew. Many have won or been shortlisted for national and international awards including Brian Deane who won Babelgum Social/Environment Award at the Cannes Film Festival in 2008 for his short film Without Words. In 2009 the final project film, FGM won a Radharc Award for its producers Richard Walsh and Julian Ulrichs, who went on to edit the recently released SING STREET. Other accolades include screenings at the Tribeca Film Festival and wins in various short film competitions both nationally and internationally.

Who’s Suited to This Course

Learning Outcomes

 

Work Placement

Study Abroad

Related Student Organisations

Course Fees

Fees: EU

€6,200 p.a. 2018/19

Fees: Tuition

€5,976 p.a. 2018/19

Fees: Student levy

€224 p.a. 2018/19

Fees: Non EU

€14,250 p.a. 2018/19

Postgraduate students in receipt of a SUSI grant—please note an F4 grant is where SUSI will pay €2,000 towards your tuition.  You will be liable for the remainder of the total fee.  An F5 grant is where SUSI will pay TUITION up to a maximum of €6,270.  SUSI will not cover the student levy of €224.

Postgraduate fee breakdown = tuition (EU or NON EU) + student levy as outlined above.

Find out More

Emma Hogan
T: 353 91 495 920
E: ehogan@nuigalway.ie

 


What Our Students Say

Kyle

Kyle Kroszner |    

I decided to come to NUI Galway to study Film because of the atmosphere. Galway's reputation for the arts is known around the world, but I wanted a school whose expectations were as high and achievable as my own. NUI Galway has that, but it also has much more. I wanted to learn more about Irish culture, storytelling, and the Irish language and I found it not only in the school, but in the city centre, outside of Galway City, and Connemara.
Niall

Niall McCann |    

The MA in Production & Directioin was everything I was looking for and more. The library offered me the chance to immerse myself in filmmakers and films I would not have ordinarily have come into contact with. Guest lecturers and Trips to film events can only serve to set further light to any enthusiasm for film a student has. The course consists of a strong emphasis on technique, structure and form, wherein the practical and theoretical combine offering a new and unique way of approaching the art form. I am currently in production on my first feature documentary titled ART WILL SAVE THE WORLD with Happy Ending Productions and I was actively encouraged and helped in every way by the staff to make this film a reality whilst studying in Huston. The MA changed my life or at least gave me the confidence I needed to change it.