HEALTH BEHAVIOUR IN SCHOOL-AGED CHILDREN (HBSC) IRELAND

World Health Organization Collaborative Cross-National Study


The Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) survey is a WHO collaborative cross-national study that monitors the health behaviours, health outcomes and social environments of school-aged children every four years. HBSC Ireland surveys school-going children aged 9-18 years. The study is conducted by the HBSC Ireland team, based at the Health Promotion Research Centre, NUI Galway.
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Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) is a cross-national research study conducted in collaboration with the World Health Organization (WHO) Regional Office for Europe. The study works on a 4 year cycle and 2022 marks the beginning of a new cycle for HBSC Ireland.

The HBSC Ireland Team are currently collecting data from randomly selected Primary and Post-primary schools invited to participate in the study. This is the 7th time that HBSC Ireland has collected data on school-aged children since 1998. Around 13,000 school students will be involved in HBSC Ireland 2022.

HBSC Ireland is funded by the Department of Health. The Department of Children, Equality, Disability, Intergration and Youth supports and recognises its importance. Organisations representing school management, teachers and parents have also been informed of the study.  Ethical approval has been obtained from NUI, Galway Research Ethics Committee.

The study is conducted internationally in 51 countries and regions across Europe and North America. For more information on the HBSC International Network see the HBSC International page or the website http://www.hbsc.org/ 

Watch a short video with information of the HBSC study

Further information can also be found on:

A number of frequently asked questions relevant to the following groups give further information on the study: