Course Overview

‘Could anything better typify the move from donkey-and-cart picture-postcard Ireland to high tech global leader in software technology that Ireland has become in recent decades?’

President of Ireland Mary McAleese, speaking about the Irish Studies online course.

Irish Studies Online – What’s it all about?

Irish Studies Online is an interdisciplinary introduction to Irish Studies, developed by the Centre for Irish Studies, NUI Galway.  The two-year part-time diploma course offers an excellent opportunity for those interested in Ireland, especially those without access to traditional programmes of study in this area. The purpose of the diploma is to provide a basic introduction to Irish life and culture through the disciplines of Archaeology, History, literature in English and in Irish (presented in translation), Political Science and Sociology, traditional Irish music and dance.

Applications and Selections

Who Teaches this Course

Requirements and Assessment

All modules will be examined by essay.

Key Facts

Entry Requirements

Entry requirements for part-time students can be found in our FAQs section (i.e. age, english language requirements etc.). There are no specific entry requirements for the Diploma in Irish Studies (Online).

Additional Requirements

Duration

Two years, part time

Next start date

September

A Level Grades ()

Average intake

N/A

Closing Date

Next start date

September

NFQ level

Level 7

Mode of study

Online Learning

ECTS weighting

30

Award

CAO

PAC code

Course Outline

Irish Studies Online comprises six modules. The modules provide an overview of Irish history from the pagan Celtic world and the coming of Christianity, through to the cataclysmic famines of the 1840s, the establishment of an independent state in 1922 and Ireland’s integration into the European community which has been ongoing since the 1970s. Students are introduced to Irish literature in both the Irish (Gaelic) and English languages, from the Old-Irish sagas and early Irish lyrics through the emergence of Anglo-Irish literature in the 18th century, to the 20th century revival of writing in Irish. Emphasis is also placed on the study of Irish society since independence with due consideration of such crucial issues as gender, religion, modernization, identity and socio-economic development.

Curriculum Information

Curriculum information relates to the current academic year (in most cases).
Course and module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Glossary of Terms

Credits
You must earn a defined number of credits (aka ECTS) to complete each year of your course. You do this by taking all of its required modules as well as the correct number of optional modules to obtain that year's total number of credits.
Module
An examinable portion of a subject or course, for which you attend lectures and/or tutorials and carry out assignments. E.g. Algebra and Calculus could be modules within the subject Mathematics. Each module has a unique module code eg. MA140.
Optional
A module you may choose to study.
Required
A module that you must study if you choose this course (or subject).
Semester
Most courses have 2 semesters (aka terms) per year.

Year 1 (15 Credits)

Required IS1164: Early Christian Ireland 431-1169


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

The course provides a brief overview of Irish history from the pagan Celtic world and the coming of Christianity to the arrival of the Normans in Ireland in 1169. Archaeological remains are studied to gain insights into Irish society in the pre-Christian period and in the Middle Ages. Students are introduced to Irish literary texts such as the Old-Irish sagas and study the ancient Irish epic text Táin Bó Cuailgne from an interdisciplinary perspective. The Celtic question is also addressed.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Outline the archaeological evidence from the Iron Age and Early Christian period.
  2. Trace major historical events during this period.
  3. Recognise examples of early literature in Irish.
  4. Discuss the accuracy of early Irish literature as a reflection of life in Ireland.
  5. Understand the arguments against a Celtic invasion of Ireland.
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module IS1164: "Early Christian Ireland 431-1169" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required IS1166: Early Modern Ireland 1603 - 1845


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

Students acquire an interdisciplinary perspective on the patterns of Early Modern Irish society by integrating perspectives gained through the study of Irish literature in both Irish (Gaelic) and English, and history during the period 1603 - 1850. Students investigate the development of Irish (Gaelic) poetry and its response to the political turmoil of this period as well as exploring the events of the 1798 rebellion. Particular attention is paid to the emergence of Anglo-Irish literature.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Evaluate the impact of various patterns of land settlement on the history and culture of the native Irish population.
  2. Compare and contrast the family origins of various literary figures of the time and explain the role this background had on their writings.
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module IS1166: "Early Modern Ireland 1603 - 1845 " and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required IS1165: Medieval Ireland 1169 - 1603


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

This course focuses on the upheaval in Irish society caused by the Anglo-Norman invasion of the twelfth century and its consequences for Irish social, political and cultural life. It provides a brief historical survey of Gaelic and Gaelicised Ireland in the early Middle Ages and an insight into the archaeology of the Irish Church. The survey also includes a brief introduction to the world of the Irish bardic poet and his work.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Describe the different forms of medieval castle and the typical abbey.
  2. Outline the significant historical events in medieval Ireland.
  3. Identify the various forms of native Irish literature from the period.
  4. Debate the impact the Anglo-Norman invasion had on Ireland.
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module IS1165: "Medieval Ireland 1169 - 1603 " and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Year 2 (15 Credits)

Required IS2164: Modern Ireland 1845 - 1998


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

Students acquire an interdisciplinary perspective on the patterns of Modern Irish society by integrating perspectives gained through the study of Irish literature in both languages - Irish (Gaelic) and English, and history during the period from the Irish Famine to the present day. Students study the development of Anglo-Irish literature in the 19th century as well as the 20th century revival of writing in Irish. Particular emphasis is given to the study of Irish society since independence.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Evaluate the impact of various patterns of land settlement on the history and culture of the native Irish population.
  2. Compare and contrast the family origins of various literary figures of the time and explain the role this background had on their writings.
  3. Be familiar with the major literary figures in both the English and Irish Language.
  4. Have an understanding of the role and history of the Irish Language in the 19th and 20th centuries.
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module IS2164: "Modern Ireland 1845 - 1998" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required IS2166: From Ceili to Riverdance: Irish Traditional Music


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

This course explores some of the key changes in Irish traditional music and dance practice during the long twentieth century, 1893 to 2000. Taking the cultural revival of the latter part of the nineteenth century as a starting point, students critically examine the role of music and dance practice in rural Ireland and the process of modernization which occurred as these practices became urbanized, both in Ireland and among her emigrant communities.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand the development of Irish traditional music and dance during the twentieth century.
  2. Critically assess the key manifestations of Irish identity through music and dance practice in the twentieth century.
  3. Identify the sound and choreography of Irish music and dance in the twentieth century.
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module IS2166: "From Ceili to Riverdance: Irish Traditional Music " and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required IS2165: Social & Political Change in Contemporary Ireland


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

This course uses the results of sociological research in Ireland to examine Irish society. There is an underlying question that is addressed as students move through the different topics - how has Irish society been changed by the economic transformation that was initiated in the 1950s? On completion of this introductory course in Irish Society, students will have gained an insight into the planned economic change and unplanned social changes that have shaped contemporary Ireland.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Compare and contrast the agricultural and industrial trends of the period.
  2. Appraise the changing role of the Catholic Church in modern Ireland as it relates to the economic and social trends of the country.
  3. Identify key issues related to the changing role of women during this period.
  4. Discuss the various trends impacting the contemporary Irish educational system.
  5. Compare and contrast various social trends that relate to changing crime statistics.
  6. Hypothesize about the modern-day threats to the environment.
  7. Identify the sources for the 'Troubles' in Northern Ireland.
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module IS2165: "Social & Political Change in Contemporary Ireland " and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Why Choose This Course?

Career Opportunities

The information and skills introduced by this course may contribute to careers in a wide variety of areas, such as in the heritage, tourism and education sectors.

Who’s Suited to This Course

This course will appeal to those who are interested in Ireland’s past and culture including primary school teachers, secondary school teachers and heritage employees.  It will also be of interest to those who are employed in the tourism industry.

Learning Outcomes

 

Work Placement

Study Abroad

Related Student Organisations

Course Fees

Fees: EU

€970 p.a.

Fees: Tuition

Fees: Student levy

Fees: Non EU

€1,470 p.a.


A fees scholarship of up to 30% may be available for students who wish to upskill for the purposes of re-employment.  Students must be registered as unemployed and in receipt of one of the following: 

  • Job-seekers Benefit
  • Job-seekers Allowance
  • One-parent family allowance
  • Disability allowance
  • Community Employment Scheme
  • Carer’s Allowance
  • Signing for social insurance contribution credits

Please download the 2018_19 Fees Scholarship Form for more information.

Find out More

 Dr. Michelle Comber

Centre for Irish Studies
NUI Galway
Tel: 091 492887
Email: michelle.comber@nuigalway.ie