Course Overview

This new multidisciplinary course provides students with insight into environment, health, and sustainability issues within urban and rural environments. It integrates ecological, health and sustainability issues and considers their interaction within the natural and built environments. It combines modules from Environmental Science, Engineering and Economics to provide students with experience of research-led learning opportunities that will develop skills in identifying and evaluating sustainable solutions for real world environmental problems. Fieldtrips to learn from the practical experience of professionals are an essential element of this course. This course is open to students from a variety of backgrounds.

This course combines theory, policy and practical experience to provide its graduates with the skills and knowledge that are needed to pursue successful careers in managing sustainable environments. It provides scene setting lectures, site visits and practical work to encourage students to adopt an informed, creative and innovative approach to problem solving. It will provide students with the competences to obtain employment in environmental consultancy, policy development or proceed to further research.

Course aims:

  1. To systematically encourage students to adopt an informed, creative, and responsive approach to environmental and land-use problem solving.
  2. To integrate an international perspective to reflect both new research findings and current national and international best practice in sustainable environmental practice that can be applied within Ireland and elsewhere.
  3. To provide research-led learning opportunities that will develop skills in identifying and evaluating sustainable solutions for real world environmental problems.

Scholarships a vailable
Find out about our Postgraduate Scholarships here.

Applications and Selections

Who Teaches this Course

Professor Mike Gormally. Dr Caitriona Carlin, Dr Gesche Kindermann, Dr Dearbhaile Morris, Dr Frances Fahy, Dr Easkey Britton, Dr Jamie Goggins, Dr Bryan McCabe, Dr Tiernan Henry, Professor Martin Feely, Dr Marcus Keane, Daniel Coakley, Dr Stephen Nash, Dr Tom van Rensburg, Dr Martin Gammell GMIT. External professionals from public, private and voluntary sector also contribute to the course.

Requirements and Assessment

Students should apply online through CRM Recruit, and submit a personal statement, a copy of primary degree award transcript(s), two reference contact details, at least one to be academic. International students should also demonstrate evidence of having English language proficiency at 6.5 IELTS.

Key Facts

Entry Requirements

Places are limited (15) and selection is based on each candidate’s academic record/relevant experience, personal statement, and letters of recommendation.

Applicants must have a primary degree with a second class honours, or equivalent in a relevant discipline. Relevant disciplines include science, marine science, engineering, environmental science, geography, social science, health promotion, engineering, economics or other related disciplines.

Applicants who do not have an academic background and have relevant experience are welcome to apply. They may be required to attend an interview.


Additional Requirements

Duration

1 year (12 months)

Next start date

September 2020

A Level Grades ()

Average intake

15

Closing Date

August 2020

NFQ level

Mode of study

ECTS weighting

90

Award

CAO

Course code

1SEV1

Course Outline

This new multidisciplinary course integrates and evaluates environment, health, and sustainability issues within the natural and built environment. Students gain experience of research-led learning opportunities in Environmental Science, Engineering and Economics that will develop skills in identifying and evaluating sustainable solutions for real world problems. A key aspect is that students learn by doing. Fieldwork and site visits, where students learn from practical experience are essential elements.

The course structure is based on a 90 ECTS model, with 60 ECTS coming from taught modules. A research project in Semester 2 Summer accounts for the remaining 30 ECTS. Assessment comprises continuous assessment (C/A) solely in Semester 1, and a combination of C/A and examination for some modules in Semester 2. Students must submit a report on their research project at the end of the summer in Semester 2.

Taught modules include: Ecosystems Assessment, The Built Environment, Renewable Energy Economics and Policy, The Environment and Human Health, Environmental Problems & Solutions, Biodiversity and Conservation, Environmental Resilience, Water Quality, Energy in Buildings, and Communicating Science & Research.

Students will develop skills to appraise sustainability issues and challenges associated with (a) integrating the built and natural environments, in particular, biodiversity mitigation measures (b) landscape evaluation and nature conservation and (c) interlinkages between the environment and human health.

Students will define current practice relating to management natural and built environments in Ireland and relate this to best practice. They will evaluate environmental issues and problems, and their drivers. Specific instances may relate to particular issues such as invasive species, water quality, green space policies, or renewable energy policy economics, for example.

Students will examine policy responses in relation to sustainability in Irish urban and rural settings, and selected international case studies. They will acquire experience in best practice in identification, surveying, mapping, assessment and management techniques at species, habitat and landscape level.

Students will assess how the development and implementation of sustainability policy in the past has met the requirements of stakeholders, both in Ireland and elsewhere. They will be able to apply appropriate techniques for sustainability, for example, energy in buildings, relative to relevant legislation and policy.

Students will synthesise and explain the complexity of both natural and socio-economic systems, together with an understanding of existing and novel sustainability policy options, to develop a competency in identifying and evaluating optimal policy options. They will assess ‘reality checking’ of candidate sustainability policies, to ensure that as far as can be determined there exist no important reasons (financial, technical, social, governance) why implementation is impractical, for example, renewable energy policy and economics.

Students learn to assess the gaps in their own knowledge, and develop skills in comprehending and evaluating information from field- and site-visits, in academic journals, books and websites. Students develop competencies in both individual and group based project scoping, development and conclusion, and the coherent and succinct reporting of findings. Student manage, assess and reflect on their learning process in a reflective journal. They build on this to be able to effectively and persuasively use the evidence-base to communicate findings appropriately using a variety of fora.   

Students learn from current practice in relation to the built and natural environment at international, national, regional and local levels, and based on the evaluation, recommend and implement improvements to current practice to ensure environmental resilience. Develop a realistic assessment of the challenges faced in developing and implementing policy to enhance sustainability. Demonstrate their awareness of the skillset they acquire throughout the course in a reflective journal in terms of any role that they themselves may play in advancing the roll-out of appropriate policy and actions in future.           

Curriculum Information

Curriculum information relates to the current academic year (in most cases).
Course and module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Glossary of Terms

Credits
You must earn a defined number of credits (aka ECTS) to complete each year of your course. You do this by taking all of its required modules as well as the correct number of optional modules to obtain that year's total number of credits.
Module
An examinable portion of a subject or course, for which you attend lectures and/or tutorials and carry out assignments. E.g. Algebra and Calculus could be modules within the subject Mathematics. Each module has a unique module code eg. MA140.
Optional
A module you may choose to study.
Required
A module that you must study if you choose this course (or subject).
Semester
Most courses have 2 semesters (aka terms) per year.

Year 1 (90 Credits)

Required MI5106: Environmental Resilience


Semester 1 and Semester 2 | Credits: 5

The module is future oriented and explores the intersection of global change, nature and public health from a resilience perspective. It encompasses a wide range of theory and debate spanning social and environmental issues, and links international examples to local context and relevance. The module will challenge students to use an interdiscipli-nary approach, drawing especially from resilience thinking, to critically reflect on current academic and public, civic, policy debates for a range of social-environment-development topics. Students will be introduced to theoretical concepts and methods of resilience thinking, and will conduct group and individual assignments that utilise these concepts and methods.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Define and explain key aspects of resilience thinking.
  2. Critically assess existing evidence in relation to how interacting systems of people and nature can best be managed in the face of uncertainty and shocks.
  3. Evaluate the importance of the approaches employed to communicate social-environmental issues and how that impacts on stakeholders’ responses.
  4. Apply and appraise resilience techniques that are used to help to reduce work/life-based pressures and promote health and well-being.
  5. Demonstrate use and application of interactive formats, dialogue techniques and reflective practice to explore concepts, understand lived realities or identify knowledge gaps.
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Navigating Social-Ecological Systems" by Fikret Berkes,Johan Colding,Carl Folke
    ISBN: 1139434799.
    Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  2. "Principles for Building Resilience" by Reinette Biggs
    ISBN: 9781107082656.
    Publisher: Cambridge University Press
The above information outlines module MI5106: "Environmental Resilience" and is valid from 2018 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required EV602: Ecosystems Assessment


Semester 1 | Credits: 10

This module introduces students to ecosystem terminology and the key techniques used to assess ecosystems from a number of different perspectives i.e. geology, hydrology, soils, biodiversity, etc. As part of the assessment, students undertake a variety of fieldwork techniques used to appraise the status of plant & animal communities in Ireland. Emphasis is placed on relating the connections between these parameters with a view to producing an overall integrated ecosystem assessment procedure.

Learning Outcomes
  1. identify a range of habitats and associated ecosystems,
  2. inspect and assess a range of ecosystem types
  3. appraise and relate different parameters that comprise an ecosystem to construct an ecological audit of a site,
  4. plan and produce habitat management guidelines,
  5. evaluate ecosystem management strategies
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Ecological Census Techniques: A Handbook" by Sutherland, W.J.
    Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  2. "Handbook of Biodiversity Methods Survey, Evaluation and Monitoring" by Hill, D; Fasham, M. Tucker, G., Shewry, M., Shaw, P.
    Publisher: Oxford University Press
  3. "Best Practice Guidance for Habitat Survey and Mapping" by Smith, G., O'Donoghue, P., O'Hora, K. & Delaney, E.
    Publisher: Heritage Council
  4. "Habitat Management for Conservation A Handbook of Techniques." by Ausden, M.
    Publisher: Oxford University Press
The above information outlines module EV602: "Ecosystems Assessment" and is valid from 2015 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required EV6101: The Environment and Human Health


Semester 1 and Semester 2 | Credits: 5

This module explores the relationships between environment, biodiversity and health. Students become competent in assessing key aspects of environmental quality. Students evaluate linkages between emerging research, policy makers and practitioners at international and European levels to inform evidence based policy and practice in relation to health and environment.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Assess the key aspects of environmental quality and interactions between environment, health and wellbeing
  2. Critically appraise existing evidence in relation to benefits to health from the environment
  3. Evaluate the provision of green spaces and benefits to health
  4. Critique the effectiveness of governmental policies and legislation to benefit human health and wellbeing in relation to the environment.
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Forests, Tree and Human Health." by Editors: Nilsson, K., Sangster, M., Gallis, C., Hartig, T., de Vries, S., Seeland, K., Schipperijn, J. (Eds.)
    ISBN: ISBN 978-90-4.
    Publisher: Springer
The above information outlines module EV6101: "The Environment and Human Health" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required EV603: Biodiversity & Conservation


Semester 1 and Semester 2 | Credits: 5

This module explores the design and implementation of effective and sustainable biodiversity policy. Students will gain competencies in critiquing the role of nature conservation legislation as a driver of effective policy while taking cognisance of the role of stakeholders in implementing good practice. Special reference will be made to the need to develop better linkages between emerging research, policy makers and practitioners to inform evidence based policy and practice.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Identify the factors that influence the design of sustainable and effective policy
  2. Assess the impact of integrating policies and legislation on landscape ecosystems
  3. Critique effective planning policies, conditions and obligations
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Habitat Management for Conservation. A Handbook of Techniques." by Ausden, M.
    Publisher: Oxford University Press.
  2. "Managing habitats for conservation." by Sutherland, W. & Hill, D.
    Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  3. "The conservation handbook." by Sutherland, W.
    Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell.
  4. "Wetlands of Ireland. Distribution, Ecology, Uses and Economic Value." by Otte, M.
    Publisher: University College Dublin Press.
The above information outlines module EV603: "Biodiversity & Conservation" and is valid from 2015 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required EV604: Environmental problems & Solutions


Semester 1 and Semester 2 | Credits: 10

This module utilises case studies to focus on environmental problems and their solutions. It explores best practice in the use of mitigation strategies to ameliorate environmental damage. Special reference will be made to the complexities in solving environmental problems (e.g. social, economic & cultural factors and environmental policy drivers). Particular emphasis will be placed on enhancing student competences to develop innovative and sustainable solutions to environmental problems.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Differentiate between good and poor environmental practice relating to a range of developments.
  2. Evaluate appropriate mitigation strategies for specific developments.
  3. Design sustainable solutions to environmental problems
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Effective Judicial Protection and the Environmental Impact Assessment Directive in Ireland (Modern Studies in European Law)." by Ryall, A.
    Publisher: Hart Publishing.
The above information outlines module EV604: "Environmental problems & Solutions" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required EC5102: Renewable Energy Economics and Policy


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

A key focus of the module is the optimal provision of renewable energy resources and on problems that arise due to the incomplete nature of markets for these resources. The course will address the theory of externalities, missing markets and property rights; the theory of public goods and Nash-Cournot equilibria. Attention is given to energy externalities, public goods, Pigovian taxes in the energy sector, emission standards, tradable permits and tradable energy certificates.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. The module is designed to equip students with strong quantitative applied modelling skills to critically analyse energy economics and policy that are fundamentally linked to the research activities of faculty and research staff. The programme has four objectives: • To provde a theoretical framework for the evaluation of energy economics and renewable energy economics
  2. To provide students with the necessary analytical skills to undertake a rigorous evaluation of renewable energy economic projects and programmes.
  3. To provide students with the interdisciplinary skills necessary to develop renewable energy-economic models and apply these to real life environmental problems.
  4. To provide students with generic modelling and policy analysis skills.
  5. To provide students with the skills to estimate non-market values associated with renewable energy projects
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (50%)
  • Continuous Assessment (50%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Energy Economics" by Bhattacharyya, S.C.
    Publisher: Springer-Verlag, London
  2. "Natural resource and environmental economics" by Perman, R., M.A. Y., McFilvary, J. and Common, M.
    Publisher: Pearson Education
  3. "Environmental economics: in theory and practice" by Hanley, N., Shogren, J.F. and White, B. 2007
    Publisher: Palgrave-Macmillan,
  4. "The theory of externalities, public goods and club goods" by Cornes, R. and Sandler, T.
    Publisher: CUP. New York
  5. "Resource economics" by Conrad, J.M.
    Publisher: CUP, New York
The above information outlines module EC5102: "Renewable Energy Economics and Policy" and is valid from 2015 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required CE466: Energy in Buildings


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

This module introduces the student to energy systems in buildings. The module describes the inter-relationships between building physics, human occupant behaviour and energy systems required to support the effective provision and maintenance of thermal comfort in buildings. Optimum states of comfort are defined including the necessary physical measurement and control infrastructure. Systematic procedures for the analysis of thermal comfort metrics and design principles of sustainable and smart buildings including conventional and renewable energy systems are presented. The content delivered is structured to consist of lectures in parallel with a team design project that provides the incremental development of energy simulation models that address the content in the lecture part, utilising real world buildings including a number of buildings on the NUI Galway campus.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Define optimum comfort states in buildings
  2. Calculate a range of building comfort metrics
  3. Describe conventional and renewable energy systems in buildings
  4. Analyse the energy requirements for specific zones in buildings
  5. Size a number of energy systems in buildings
  6. Describe the various sustainability indicators and weighting systems in sustainable assessment methodologies for buildings throughout their life-cycle
  7. Develop validated energy simulation models for a variety of HVAC systems
  8. Present a critiqued literature review of innovative energy concepts and technologies
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (50%)
  • Continuous Assessment (50%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Faber & Kell's Heating & Air-conditioning of Buildings, Tenth Edition" by Doug Oughton, Steve Hodkinson
    ISBN: 0750683651.
    Publisher: Butterworth-Heinemann
  2. "Air conditioning engineering" by W. P. Jones
    ISBN: 9780750650748.
    Publisher: Oxford ; Butterworth-Heinemann, c2001.
  3. "Energy Systems and Sustainability" by Bob Everett (Editor), Godfrey Boyle (Editor), Stephen Peake (Editor), Janet Ramage (Editor)
    ISBN: 9780199593743.
    Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
The above information outlines module CE466: "Energy in Buildings" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required CE476: The Built Environment


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

This module is designed to introduce Engineers and Project Managers to the basic principles of architecture, planning and the considerations and common challenges involved in the successful design of both. It enables students to take up a position within the construction (or related) industry armed with a meaningful understanding of how their individual role is critical to realising good design. It allows meaningful communication with architects and planners with the mutual benefits of same.

Learning Outcomes
  1. a. Understand ‘The Built Environment (TBE)’, and how it has evolved over time b. Appreciate who (and by what mechanisms) influences changes to TBE c. Describe what society and designers look for from TBE today and how we define it’s quality. d. Understand the key stages in a development process and a brief introduction to some different procurement routes e. Understand the evolution of the design team; the main players and their roles today. f. Understand basic architectural terminology and their application and relevant to design.
  2. a. Appreciate the predominant and evolving styles of Architecture in Ireland from pre-historic to the 20th Century and will be made aware of the most notable architects of this period. b. Identify of what period and style a historic building belongs to.
  3. a. Appreciate the predominant and evolving styles of Architecture in 21st Century and be aware of the most notable architects and a sample of their work. b. Identify some works of the ‘Architectural Masters’ who still most heavily influence the architecture of today.
  4. a. List the more influential architects and projects of the 21st century. Students will be exposed to current advancements in architecture and its possibilities for the future. b. Formulate opinions on own personal taste as well as finding an appreciation for other works which fall outside personal tastes.
  5. a. Assess the design quality of the built environment and be aware of what contributes to good design and what will have a negative impact. b. Notice (and formulate an opinion on) how various design moves and their articulation effect the overall space, and quality of the experience. c. Be able to carry out a basic assessment of a sample brief and site and identify the main issues to be addressed in any proposed design.
  6. a. Identify some of the design challenges facing architects and how through clever design, those challenges can mould and contribute positively to the final design solution.
  7. a. Be familiar with some of ‘the best of contemporary Irish Architecture’ and appreciate the level of design b. Form their own educated opinion on some of the projects shown.
  8. a. Describe concepts of urban design/ planning through a worked Irish example, therefore will see how these concepts come together in reality. b. Identify what elements contribute to the success of urban design/ planning.
  9. a. Appreciate what makes successful contemporary urban planning projects in the world, including how these project can be conceived, what parties make them happen, types of problems that can occur and how good urban design has such a huge impact on the way people live.
  10. Recognise another facet of design – i.e the design of the ‘in between spaces’ and appreciate the challenges and what is involved in good urban design.
  11. Describe the stages of the design process. What type of documentation is referenced and produced at each stage. Who is involved at each stage and what role they play.
  12. An understanding of the principles of conservation (including various charters) and their appropriate application to sample projects.
  13. An understanding and basic knowledge of energy-efficient, energy-conserving, and energy producing buildings and different Sustainable development rating systems used in industry today.
  14. a. An understanding of Green Infrastructure. b. A basic knowledge of some sound ecological urban design and infrastructure principles and some built examples of same.
  15. A basic knowledge of what Ideas and possibilities are currently being explored for the future in relation to architecture and urban design.
  16. A knowledge of common, sustainable and technologically advanced Construction Materials and some innovative applications.
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (70%)
  • Continuous Assessment (30%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module CE476: "The Built Environment" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required EV5103: Sustainable Environments Research Project module


Semester 2 | Credits: 30

This module is undertaken by the student during the summer (trimester 3). The student carries out an individual research project from a list provided by co-ordinators. The student will write up the research according to the requirements of an appropriate journal or as a manual.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Apply appropriate laboratory and field methodologies skills to the project
  2. Develop expertise in experimental design and planning skills
  3. Acquire good practice in data recording skills
  4. Become skilled at suitable scientific data analyses evaluate, examine and understand research area
  5. Synthesise current thinking and apply it to the research project
  6. Write a scientific paper based on research project according to appropriate journal
  7. Present oral and written scientific presentations.
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (58%)
  • Research (42%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module EV5103: "Sustainable Environments Research Project module" and is valid from 2019 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional BI5108: Green Lab Principles and Practice


Semester 1 and Semester 2 | Credits: 5

This module covers Green Lab principles and practices and their role in relation to promoting sustainability in an institution or company. The module further covers climate change, management of energy, water and waste, personal social responsibilities, the plastic problem and Green Lab organisations worldwide.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Describe root cause of climate change and challenges associated with controlling climate change.
  2. List renewable and non-renewable energy sources and proposed mechanisms for moving towards majority renewable energy sources.
  3. Differentiate between the different categories of plastic and their capacity for recycling, reduction or replacement within a laboratory context.
  4. Explain the meaning of a 'circular' economy and how this applies to a laboratory setting.
  5. Evaluate Ireland's performance in terms of climate change and its obligations under global climate change agreements.
  6. Define Green Lab principles and practice and how they can be applied in order to create a sustainable laboratory environment.
  7. Evaluate existing Green Lab principles and recommend appropriate Green Lab practices to create a sustainable laboratory environment.
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (25%)
  • Department-based Assessment (25%)
  • Research (50%)
Module Director
Reading List
  1. "The Sustainable Laboratory Handbook: Design, Equipment, Operation" by n/a
    ISBN: 978-3-527-335.
    Publisher: Wiley
The above information outlines module BI5108: "Green Lab Principles and Practice" and is valid from 2019 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional CE6107: Water Quality


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

The health of the Earth's surface waters is vitally important to humans as we use them for many different purposes including water supply, recreation, disposal of wastewaters, irrigation and energy generation. In addition, they are home to a large proportion of the Earth's plants and animals, many of which are important food sources for humans. The aim of this module is to provide students with knowledge of the factors affecting water quality including natural and man-made stressors of water quality, transport and mixing processes, and the bio-geo-chemical interactions of the water quality cycle. Students will also learn the fundamental theory of water quality modelling so that they will be able to use water quality models in a sensible manner. The primary focus of the module is on rivers.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. understand the impact of soil type and agricultural practices on losses from agricultural land.
  2. utilise state-of-the-art measurement and analysis techniques to quantify losses of nutrients and suspended solids from catchments.
  3. understand the primary processes of mixing in rivers, including advection, diffusion and dispersion.
  4. derive the transport equations for diffusion and advection (separately) and the 1D advection-diffusion and advection-dispersion equations.
  5. describe and express mathematically the coefficients of diffusion and dispersion.
  6. apply a number of mathematical approaches (ideal reactors and control volume) to model transport of materials in incompletely mixed (i..e distributed) systems.
  7. understand the physical, chemical and biological processes that play a role in water quality, i.e. the water quality cycle.
  8. develop mathematical formulations of the chemical and biological processes described within the water quality cycle.
  9. develop a 1D water quality model of a case study site using the industry-standard modelling software HECRAS, and conduct some scenario modelling.
  10. appreciate the sensitivity of a water quality model to the prescription of the rates and constants used to describe various physical, chemical and biological processes.
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (80%)
  • Continuous Assessment (20%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module CE6107: "Water Quality" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional EV5102: Communicating Science and Research


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

Research communication aims to generate support for engaged research, to inform decision making and policy, and engage the general public. This module provides an introduction to research communication and community engagement and enables students to critically engage with different communication methods. This module explores different ways and technologies for communication in relation to different audiences and examines the range of social media tools available and their use in a science communication/public engagement context.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the thoretical background that underpins research communication with different audiences.
  2. Assess the efficiency and relevance of different approaches to research communication
  3. Define current practice in relation to communication and social media use and relate this to best practice.
  4. Appraise the principles of communication as they pertain to empirical research findings and to evaluate how respective research might best be communicated.
  5. Demonstrate ability to apply appropriate communication methods relative to different audiences.
  6. Appraise the merit and value of science and research communication activities to help improve communication practices
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module EV5102: "Communicating Science and Research" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Why Choose This Course?

Career Opportunities

Graduates with this qualification will pursue a wide range of careers in the public, private and voluntary sector. Job opportunities exist within environmental, agri-environmental and sustainability consultancies, or as sustainability officers in companies and corporations. Graduates may also find employment within national, regional and local government sectors. Graduates may also go on to further research.

Who’s Suited to This Course

Learning Outcomes

 

Work Placement

Study Abroad

Related Student Organisations

Course Fees

Fees: EU

€7,450 p.a. 2020/21

Fees: Tuition

€7,226 p.a. 2020/21

Fees: Student levy

€224 p.a.2020/21

Fees: Non EU

€20,750 p.a. 2020/21

Find out More

Caitríona Carlin
E: caitriona.carlin@nuigalway.ie
T: +353 91 493 863 

Downloads

  • Postgraduate Taught Prospectus 2020

    Postgraduate Taught Prospectus 2020 PDF (21 MB)