Entry Points (2017)
405

Course Overview

Mechanical Engineering is a subject concerned with the design and manufacture of parts and systems that make up the range of machinery and equipment you see around you, from a can opener to a jet aircraft. Mechanical engineers design the tools and processes necessary to create all man-made products, and are often involved from conceiving of an idea right through to seeing it as a finished product ready for its commercial application. They design everything you think of as a device or machine. Devices used in engines, the components used in transportation, power conversion equipment, like the steam and wind turbines used in modern electric power plants, and processing equipment used in oil and gas rigs all come within the remit of the mechanical engineer.

If you think you have or can develop the skills and knowledge to understand the requirements for designing a moving device or machine for the environment it will be used in as well as understand how it will best be manufactured, then you may make a good mechanical engineer. This degree programme is designed to provide graduates with the skills to face the challenge for newer, better, faster, more reliable, more versatile, longer-lasting and more environmentally friendly products and processes. These skills need also to be complemented by the managerial and personal skills needed to interact with teams on joint projects.  

Learning about Mechanical Engineering will help you to develop your creative side, a part of your thinking that will enable you to design a new product or system and the analytical skills to make it a reality. You will also learn about the value of the teamwork skills that go into the successful production of most devices and processes used in today's world. These are valuable skills that will be useful in other areas of your life also.

Applications and Selections

Who Teaches this Course

Requirements and Assessment

Key Facts

Entry Requirements

Minimum Grade H5 in two subjects and passes in four other subjects at O6/H7 Level in the Leaving Certificate, including Irish, English, Mathematics, a laboratory science subject (i.e. Chemistry, Physics, Biology, Physics with Chemistry (joint) or Agricultural Science) or Technology, and any two other subjects recognised for entry purposes. 

Additional Requirements

Students must obtain a minimum of Grade H4 in the Higher Level Leaving Certificate paper in Mathematics or, alternatively, obtain a pass in the Engineering Maths Qualifying Examination (held in the University).

For A-Levels: A minimum of Grade C in Mathematics is required
Duration

4 years

Next start date

September 2018

A Level Grades (2017)

ABB & c(AS) or equivalent combination

Average intake

40

Closing Date

Next start date

September 2018

NFQ level

Mode of study

ECTS weighting

Award

CAO

GY405

PAC code

Course Outline

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Curriculum Information

Curriculum information relates to the current academic year (in most cases).
Course and module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Glossary of Terms

Credits
You must earn a defined number of credits (aka ECTS) to complete each year of your course. You do this by taking all of its required modules as well as the correct number of optional modules to obtain that year's total number of credits.
Module
An examinable portion of a subject or course, for which you attend lectures and/or tutorials and carry out assignments. E.g. Algebra and Calculus could be modules within the subject Mathematics. Each module has a unique module code eg. MA140.
Subject
Some courses allow you to choose subjects, where related modules are grouped together. Subjects have their own required number of credits, so you must take all that subject's required modules and may also need to obtain the remainder of the subject's total credits by choosing from its available optional modules.
Optional
A module you may choose to study.
Required
A module that you must study if you choose this course (or subject).
Required Core Subject
A subject you must study because it's integral to that course.
Semester
Most courses have 2 semesters (aka terms) per year, so a three-year course will have six semesters in total. For clarity, this page will refer to the first semester of year 2 as 'Semester 3'.

Further Education

Upon completion of the undergraduate degree, suitably qualified students have the option to enrol and continue their studies to Masters or PhD level.

Students can advance to Masters level (ME) through our one year taught Masters programme (September-June) that builds on the successful completion of their undergraduate programme, subject to a sufficient standard (2nd Class Honours minimum). This programme is an integrated follow-on to the BE programme and is designed to meet Engineers Ireland’s criterion for Level 9 degrees, providing graduates with a route to Chartered Engineering status that will be recognised worldwide.

Masters degree education is becoming increasingly the norm internationally in Engineering, and this programme strengthens the ability of our graduates to compete nationally and internationally at the highest level for employment in industry and other sectors of the economy.

In PhD research, as well as Masters research projects, students create and use advanced experimental and computational techniques to discover new knowledge in diverse fields including materials, medical devices, fluid dynamics, and energy. We collaborate closely with researchers in biomedical and energy systems engineering, and with industry, both local and international. In industrial engineering, student work on topics including ergonomics, enterprise engineering and health and safety.

Why Choose This Course?

Career Opportunities

As Mechanical Engineering is perhaps the most wide ranging of engineering disciplines, it offers diverse career opportunities. Graduates go on to work in such areas as research, industrial design, project management, environmental protection, energy production, technical sales, process control, manufacturing, aeronautics, and materials and product development. For students interested in pursuing further education, the PhD and MEngSc degrees are obtained through doing research work along with advanced study. Research students specialise in an area of research, working with a high degree of independence.

Who’s Suited to This Course

Learning Outcomes

 

Work Placement

Students will undertake an eight month (January - August) off-campus work placement following completion of their third year of study. In the event that no external placement is available, students will be given projects on campus. This Professional Experience Programme gives students an opportunity to work on projects relevant to their course of study and it significantly improves their chances of obtaining employment after graduation.

Study Abroad

Related Student Organisations

Course Fees

Fees: EU

€7,492 p.a. 2018/19

Fees: Tuition

€4,268 p.a. 2018/19

Fees: Student Contribution

€3,000 p.a. 2018/19

Fees: Student levy

€224 p.a. 2018/19

Fees: Non EU

€13,750 p.a. 2018/19
EU Fees 2018/19:
- Tuition:
may be paid by the Irish Government on your behalf if you qualify for free tuition fees see - free fee initiative.
- Student Contribution: €3,000 - payable by all students but may by paid by SUSI if you apply and are deemed eligible for a means tested SUSI grant.
- Student Levy:  €224 - payable by all students and is not covered by SUSI.

Find out More

Mechanical Engineering Administrator
Mechanical Engineering
RM 2050 Alice Perry Engineering Building
NUI Galway
Galway
H91 TK33
T +353 91 492 723
E mecheng@nuigalway.ie
www.nuigalway.ie/engineering-informatics/mechanical-engineering

What Our Students Say

James

James Grogan |   BE (Mechanical)

...I have always had a keen interest in finding out how things work, which often led me to taking apart everything I could get my hands on when I was younger. In third year students spend five months working in industry. This gives a real appreciation of how everything you learn in the classroom can be applied in an industrial setting. It is likely that knowledge of this area will become very important in the future, as it will be the next generation of engineers who must rise to the challenge of designing cleaner and more efficient systems...